Italian Proverbs

Italians (italiani [itaˈljaːni]) are a Romance ethnic group and nation native to the Italian geographical region and its neighbouring insular territories. Italians share a common culture, history, ancestry and language.

Italian Proverbs are short expressions of popular wisdom from Italy and other countries where Italian is spoken. A collection of Italian Proverbs to inspire you. Wise Italian Sayings in the form of proverbs that have been passed down for generations.

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Italian Proverbs

“They say so,” is half a lie.

A bad agreement is better than a good lawsuit. – Italian Proverb

A barking cur does not bite. – Italian Proverb

A barking dog never bites. – Italian Proverb

A beard well lathered is half shaved. – Italian Proverb

A beautiful woman smiling, bespeaks a purse weeping. – Italian Proverb

A beetle is a beauty in the eyes of his mother. – Italian Proverb

A bird in the cage is worth a hundred at large. – Italian Proverb

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. – Italian Proverb

A blind man is not judge of colours. – Italian Proverb

A book whos sale’s forbidden all men rush to see, and prohibition turns one reader into three. – Italian Proverb

A book whose sale’s forbidden all men rush to see, and prohibition turns one reader into three. – Italian Proverb

A bow that is bent too far will break. – Italian Proverb

A bow that is bent too far will break. – Italian Proverb

A braying ass eats little hay. – Italian Proverb

A burden that one chooses is not felt. – Italian Proverb

A burden which one chooses is not felt. – Italian Proverb

A cage made of gold does not feed the bird inside of it. – Italian Proverb

A calm portends a storm. – Italian Proverb

A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle. – Italian Proverb

A cask of wine works more miracles than a church full of saints. – Italian Proverb

A cat pent up becomes a lion. – Italian Proverb

A cat that licks the spit is not to be trusted with roast meat. – Italian Proverb

A clear bargain, a dear friend. – Italian Proverb

A cloak is not made for a single shower of rain. – Italian Proverb

A closed mouth catches no flies. – Italian Proverb

A cracked pot never fell off the hook. – Italian Proverb

A crown is no cure for the headache. – Italian Proverb

A cur’s tail grows fast. – Italian Proverb

A dead man does not make war. – Italian Proverb

A doctor and a clown know more than a doctor alone. – Italian Proverb

A dog is never offended at being pelted with bones. – Italian Proverb

A dog never bit me but I had some of his hair. – Italian Proverb

A dog that bites silently. – Italian Proverb

A donkey cannot trot for long. – Italian Proverb

A drop of water breaks a stone. – Italian Proverb

A drowning man would catch at razors. – Italian Proverb

A drunk man’s words are a sober man’s thoughts. – Italian Proverb

A farthing saved is twice earned. – Italian Proverb

A fat kitchen is next door to poverty. – Italian Proverb

A fat kitchen, a lean testament. – Italian Proverb

A favor to come is better than a hundred received. – Italian Proverb

A fine shot never killed a bird. – Italian Proverb

A fool can ask more questions than seven wise men can answer. – Italian Proverb

A fool carveth a piece of his heart to every one that sits near him. – Italian Proverb

A fool finds no pleasure in understanding but delights in airing his own opinions. – Italian Proverb

A fool finds pleasure in evil conduct, but a man of understanding delights in wisdom. – Italian Proverb

A fool gives full vent to his anger, but a wise man keeps himself under control. – Italian Proverb

A fool throws a stone into a well, and it requires a hundred wise men to get it out again. – Italian Proverb

A fools knows his own business better than a wise man knows that of others. – Italian Proverb

A fool’s spark glows in all men. – Italian Proverb

A forced kindness deserves no thanks. – Italian Proverb

A friend is not known till he is lost. – Italian Proverb

A friend, and look to thyself. – Italian Proverb

A full sack pricks up its ear. – Italian Proverb

A gift delayed, and long expected, is not given, but sold dear. – Italian Proverb

A gift long expected is sold, not given. – Italian Proverb

A gift long waited for is sold, not given. – Italian Proverb

A gift with a kind countenance is a double present. – Italian Proverb

A goaded ass must trot. – Italian Proverb

A gold key opens every door. – Italian Proverb

A gold ring does not cure a felon. – Italian Proverb

A golden bit makes none the better horse. – Italian Proverb

A golden cage does not feed the bird. – Italian Proverb

A good anvil does not fear the hammer. – Italian Proverb

A good anvil fears no hammer. – Italian Proverb

A good appetite does not want sauce. – Italian Proverb

A good beginning makes a good ending. – Italian Proverb

A good cavalier never lacks a lance. – Italian Proverb

A good horse and a bad horse need the spur; a good woman and a bad woman need the stick. – Italian Proverb

A good horse cannot be of a bad color. – Italian Proverb

A good horse never lacks a saddle. – Italian Proverb

A good lawyer makes a bad neighbor. – Italian Proverb

A good mother is worth a hundred teachers. – Italian Proverb

A good paymaster does not hesitate to give good security. – Italian Proverb

A good thing lost is valued. – Italian Proverb

A greased mouth cannot say no. – Italian Proverb

A great church and little devotion. – Italian Proverb

A great liar has need of good memory. – Italian Proverb

A great man will not trample on a worm, nor sneak to an emperor. – Italian Proverb

A guest and a fish stink in three days. – Italian Proverb

A guilty conscience needs no accuser. – Italian Proverb

A hair of the dog cures the bite. – Italian Proverb

A happy heart is better than a full purse. – Italian Proverb

A hard beginning maketh a good ending. – Italian Proverb

A heavy shower is soon over. – Italian Proverb

A hidden sin is half forgiven. – Italian Proverb

A horse falls though he has four legs. – Italian Proverb

A horse grown fat kicks. – Italian Proverb

A hundred wagon loads of thoughts will not pay a single ounce of debt. – Italian Proverb

A hundred years cannot repair a moment’s loss of honour. – Italian Proverb

A hundred-year-old revenge still has its baby teeth. – Italian Proverb

A hungry ass eats any straw. – Italian Proverb

A hungry belly has no ears. – Italian Proverb

A hungry dog does not fear the stick. – Italian Proverb

A jade eats as much as a good horse. – Italian Proverb

A kiss without a moustache is like beef without mustard. – Italian Proverb

A kitchen dog never was good for the chase. – Italian Proverb

A lawsuit is a fruit-tree planted in a lawyer’s garden. – Italian Proverb

A lean horse does not kick. – Italian Proverb

A liar is sooner caught than a cripple. – Italian Proverb

A little gall make a great deal of honey bitter. – Italian Proverb

A little man often cast a long shadow. – Italian Proverb

A little man often casts a long shadow. – Italian Proverb

A little spark kindles a great fire. – Italian Proverb

A little stone overturns a great cart. – Italian Proverb

A little stream drives a great mill. – Italian Proverb

A little truth helps the lie go down. – Italian Proverb

A little truth makes the whole lie pass. – Italian Proverb

A living ass is better than a dead doctor. – Italian Proverb

A living dog is been than a dead lion. – Italian Proverb

A lover’s anger is short-lived. – Italian Proverb

A loving man, a jealous man. – Italian Proverb

A mad parish, a mad priest. – Italian Proverb

A man of straw needs a woman of gold. – Italian Proverb

A man of words and not of deeds Is like a garden full of weeds. – Italian Proverb

A man shall learn to sail in all winds. – Italian Proverb

A man should learn to sail in all winds. – Italian Proverb

A man warned is as good as two. – Italian Proverb

A man was hanged for saying what was true. – Italian Proverb

A man’s own opinion is never wrong. – Italian Proverb

A market is three women and a goose. – Italian Proverb

A married man is a caged bird. – Italian Proverb

A meal without wine is a day without sunshine. – Italian Proverb – Italian Proverb

A meal without wine is like a day without sunshine. – Italian Proverb

A mild sheep is suck by every lamb. – Italian Proverb

A mill and a wife are always in want of something. – Italian Proverb

A mill cannot grind with the water that is past. – Italian Proverb

A mischievous dog must be tied short. – Italian Proverb

A misfortune and a friar seldom go alone. – Italian Proverb

A mouse will scare a thief. – Italian Proverb

A muffled cat is no good mouser. – Italian Proverb

A mule that thinks he is a stag discovers his mistake when he comes to leap over the ditch. – Italian Proverb

A near neighbour is better than a distant cousin. – Italian Proverb

A new broom is good for three days. – Italian Proverb

A new net won’t catch an old bird. – Italian Proverb

A pear will never fall into a closed mouth. – Italian Proverb

A pitcher that goes oft to the well is broken at last. – Italian Proverb

A place for everything, and everything in its place. – Italian Proverb

A priest is a man who is called Father by everyone except his own children who are obliged to call him Uncle. – Italian Proverb

A proud pauper and a rich miser are contemptible beings. – Italian Proverb

A ragged coat finds little credit. – Italian Proverb

A ragged sack holds no grain, a poor man is not taken into counsel. – Italian Proverb

A rainy morn oft brings a pleasant day. – Italian Proverb

A rakish bachelor makes a jealous husband. – Italian Proverb

A rotting fish begins to stink at the head. – Italian Proverb

A runaway horse punishes himself. – Italian Proverb

A sack was never so full but that it would hold another grain. – Italian Proverb

A saddle fits more backs than one. – Italian Proverb

A sailor must have his eye trained to the rocks and sands as well as the north star. – Italian Proverb

A scalded dog thinks cold water hot. – Italian Proverb

A scorpion never stung me but I cured myself with its grease. – Italian Proverb

A secret imparted is no longer a secret. – Italian Proverb

A sheep’s bite is never more than skip deep. – Italian Proverb

A short tail won’t keep off flies. – Italian Proverb

A shut mouth catches no flies. – Italian Proverb

A sin concealed is half forgiven. – Italian Proverb

A slothful man never has time. – Italian Proverb

A small woman always seems newly married. – Italian Proverb

A solitary man is either a beast or an angel. – Italian Proverb

A solitary man is either a brute or an angel. – Italian Proverb

A starved town is soon forced to surrender. – Italian Proverb

A stick is soon found to beat a dog. – Italian Proverb

A stout heart overcomes ill fortune. – Italian Proverb

A tender-hearted mother makes a scabby daughter. – Italian Proverb

A thing done has a head. – Italian Proverb

A thing is never much talked of but there is some truth in it. – Italian Proverb

A thorn has a small point, but the person who feels it does not forget its sting. – Italian Proverb

A thousand probabilities do not make one truth. – Italian Proverb

A threatened buffet is never well given. – Italian Proverb

A traveler may lie with authority. – Italian Proverb

A tree often transplanted is never loaded with fruit. – Italian Proverb

A true friend, is one that will take a bullet for you in the war. – Italian Proverb

A vagabond monk never spoke well of his convent. – Italian Proverb

A voluntary burthen is no burthen. – Italian Proverb

A volunteer is worth twenty pressed men. – Italian Proverb

A waiting appetite kindles many a spite. – Italian Proverb

A white wall is the fool’s paper. – Italian Proverb

A wicked man’s gift has a touch of his master. – Italian Proverb

A wise man and a fool together, know more than a wise man alone. – Italian Proverb

A wise man cares not for that which he cannot have. – Italian Proverb

A wise man cares not for what he cannot have. – Italian Proverb

A wise man does at first what a fool must do at last. – Italian Proverb

A wise person sometimes changes his mind, but a fool never does. – Italian Proverb

A woman who cries, a man who swears, a horse that sweats, all imposture. – Italian Proverb

A woman who loves to be at the window is like a bunch of grapes on the wayside. – Italian Proverb

A woman’s answer is never to seek. – Italian Proverb

A woman’s in pain, a woman’s in woe, a woman is ill, when she likes to be so. – Italian Proverb

A woman’s place is in the home. – Italian Proverb

A word to the wise is enough. – Italian Proverb

A wound foreseen paint the less. – Italian Proverb

Abandon all hope, ye who enter here. – Italian Proverb

Absence is a foe to love; away from the eyes, away from the heart. – Italian Proverb

Absence is a foe to love; out of sight out of mind. – Italian Proverb

Absence is the enemy of love. – Italian Proverb

Adam must have an Eve to blame for his faults. – Italian Proverb

After one pope another is made. – Italian Proverb

After shaving there is nothing to shear. – Italian Proverb

After the game, the king and the pawn go into the same box. – Italian Proverb

After the ship has sunk, everyone knows how she might have been saved. – Italian Proverb

After the storm ends, the sun will shine. – Italian Proverb

Agree between yourselves, quoth Arlotto, and I will make it rain. – Italian Proverb

All are brave when the enemy flies. – Italian Proverb

All are not saints who go to church. – Italian Proverb

All in good time. – Italian Proverb

All is not butter that comes from the cow. – Italian Proverb

All is not gold that glitters. – Italian Proverb

All roads lead to Rome. – Italian Proverb

All saint without, all devil within. – Italian Proverb

All saints do not work miracles. – Italian Proverb

All ships leak: some amidships, some in the bows, some in the hold. – Italian Proverb

All tastes are tastes. – Italian Proverb

All that’s fair must fade. 

All the brains are not in one head. – Italian Proverb

All the fingers are not alike. – Italian Proverb

All the flowers of tomorrow are in the seeds of yesterday. – Italian Proverb

All the honey a bee gathers during its lifetime doesn’t sweeten its sting. – Italian Proverb

All the keys do not hang at one girdle. – Italian Proverb

All the sheep are not for the wolf. – Italian Proverb

All things are difficult before they are easy. – Italian Proverb

All water runs to the sea. – Italian Proverb

All’s well that ends well. – Italian Proverb

Although the sun shines, leave not your cloak at home. – Italian Proverb

Among men of honour a word is a bond. – Italian Proverb

Among thorns grow roses. – Italian Proverb

An ambassador beareth no blame. – Italian Proverb

An ass’s tail will not make a sieve. – Italian Proverb

An ass’s trot does not last long. – Italian Proverb

An eagle will not catch flies. – Italian Proverb

An empty sack will not stand upright. – Italian Proverb

An idle man is the devil’s bolster. – Italian Proverb

An old dog does not bark for nothing. – Italian Proverb

An old dog does not grow used to the collar. – Italian Proverb

An old dog will learn no tricks. – Italian Proverb

An old flag is an honour to its captain. – Italian Proverb

An old horse for a young soldier. – Italian Proverb

An old ox makes a straight furrow. – Italian Proverb

An old poacher makes the best gamekeeper. – Italian Proverb

An old quarrel is easily renewed. – Italian Proverb

An ounce of discretion is better than a pound of knowledge. – Italian Proverb

An unasked for excuse infers transgression. – Italian Proverb

Anger can be an expensive luxury. – Italian Proverb

Anger increases love. – Italian Proverb

Any excuse is good if it hold good. – Italian Proverb

Any man can be a father, but it takes a special person to be a dad. – Italian Proverb

Any plan is bad that cannot be changed. – Italian Proverb

Any port in a storm. – Italian Proverb

Any publicity is good publicity. – Italian Proverb

Any water will put out fire. – Italian Proverb

Anyone who is satisfied to stand still should not complain when others pass him. – Italian Proverb

Appetite comes in eating. – Italian Proverb

Applaud the man who cheats a cheater. – Italian Proverb

Argus at home, a mole abroad. – Italian Proverb

Arms carry peace. – Italian Proverb

As both a good horse and a bad horse heed the spur, so both a good woman and a bad woman need the stick. – Italian Proverb

As demure as an old whore at a christening. – Italian Proverb

As is the lover so is the beloved. – Italian Proverb

As soon as a new law is made, a way around it is devised. – Italian Proverb

As the snow melts the filth shows through. – Italian Proverb

As you would have a daughter so choose a wife. – Italian Proverb

Ask my chum if I am a thief. – Italian Proverb

Ask my companion if I be a thief. – Italian Proverb

Ask which was born first, the hen or the egg. – Italian Proverb

Asking costs little. – Italian Proverb

Associate with the good and you will be one of them. – Italian Proverb

Assurance is two-thirds success. – Italian Proverb

At a dangerous passage yield precedence. – Italian Proverb

At a good bargain pause and ponder. – Italian Proverb

At a great pennyworth pause awhile. – Italian Proverb

At a great river be the last to pass. – Italian Proverb

At a round table there is no dispute about place. – Italian Proverb

At an open chest the righteous sins. – Italian Proverb

At last the foxes all meet at the furrier’s. – Italian Proverb

At table bashfulness is out of place. – Italian Proverb

At the end of the game we see who wins. – Italian Proverb

At the end of the game you’ll see who’s the winner. – Italian Proverb

At the end of the game, the pawn and the king go back in the same box. – Italian Proverb

At the end of the work you may judge of the workmen. – Italian Proverb

Bad grass does not make good hay. – Italian Proverb

Bad is the sack that will not bear patching. – Italian Proverb

Bad is the wool that cannot be died. – Italian Proverb

Bad news is the first to come. – Italian Proverb

Be sure before you marry of a house wherein to tarry. – Italian Proverb

Be the horse good or bad always wear your spurs. – Italian Proverb

Be the same thing that ye wa’d be ca’d. – Italian Proverb

Beat the churl and he will be your friend. – Italian Proverb

Beat the rogue and he will be your friend. – Italian Proverb

Beauty and folly are often companions. – Italian Proverb

Beauty and folly are old companions. – Italian Proverb

Because of a period, Martin lost his post. – Italian Proverb

Bed is the poor man’s opera. – Italian Proverb

Believe a boaster as you would a liar. – Italian Proverb

Below the navel there is neither religion nor truth. – Italian Proverb

Bend the tree while it is young. – Italian Proverb

Better a lean agreement than a fat sentence. – Italian Proverb

Better a living donkey than a dead doctor. – Italian Proverb

Better a mouse in the pot than no stew at all. – Italian Proverb

Better a near neighbour than a distant cousin. – Italian Proverb

Better alone than in bad company. – Italian Proverb

Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow. – Italian Proverb

Better ask than go astray. – Italian Proverb

Better aught than nought. – Italian Proverb

Better be a bird of the wood than a bird in the cage. – Italian Proverb

Better be envied than pitied. – Italian Proverb

Better be the head of a cat than the tail of a lion. – Italian Proverb

Better be the head of a lizard than the tail of a dragon. – Italian Proverb

Better bend than break. – Italian Proverb

Better gain in mud than lose in gold. – Italian Proverb

Better give a penny than lend twenty. – Italian Proverb

Better give a penny then lend twenty. – Italian Proverb

Better give than not to have to give. – Italian Proverb

Better give the wool than the sheep. – Italian Proverb

Better have an egg to-day than a hen to-morrow. – Italian Proverb

Better have one bee than a host of flies. – Italian Proverb

Better is an enemy to well. – Italian Proverb

Better late than never. – Italian Proverb

Better lose the saddle than the horse. – Italian Proverb

Better no law than laws not enforced. – Italian Proverb

Better once than never. – Italian Proverb

Better once than never. – Italian Proverb

Better one day as a lion than a hundred as a sheep. – Italian Proverb

Better one true friend than a hundred relatives. – Italian Proverb

Better slip with the foot than with the tongue. – Italian Proverb

Better to ask than go astray. – Italian Proverb

Better to ask than to go astray. – Italian Proverb

Better to fall from the window than the roof. – Italian Proverb

Better to live well than long. – Italian Proverb

Better to lose the wool than the sheep. – Italian Proverb

Better to ride an ass that carries me than a horse that throws me. – Italian Proverb

Better untaught than ill taught. – Italian Proverb

Better untaught than ill taught. – Italian Proverb

Between saying and doing, many a pair of shoes is worn out. – Italian Proverb

Between the hand and the mouth the soup is spilt. – Italian Proverb

Between two cowards, he has the advantage who first detects the other. – Italian Proverb

Between two cowards, the first to detect the other has the advantage. – Italian Proverb

Beware of “Had I but known.” – Italian Proverb

Beware of a poor alchemist. – Italian Proverb

Beware of him who has nothing to lose. – Italian Proverb

Beware of the person with nothing to lose. – Italian Proverb

Beware of the vinegar of sweet wine. – Italian Proverb

Beware of vinegar made of sweet wine. – Italian Proverb

Beware the person with nothing to lose. – Italian Proverb

Big flies break the spider’s web. – Italian Proverb

Big mouthfuls often choke. – Italian Proverb

Bitter fruit will fall before the ripe. – Italian Proverb

Blessed is the misfortune that comes alone. – Italian Proverb

Blessings brighten as they take their flight. – Italian Proverb

Blows are not given upon conditions. – Italian Proverb

Blue are the hills that are far away. – Italian Proverb

Boil not the pap before the child is born. – Italian Proverb

Boil stones in butter, and you may sip the broth. – Italian Proverb

Borderers are either thieves or murderers. – Italian Proverb

Borrowed garments never sit well. – Italian Proverb

Break the legs of an evil custom. – Italian Proverb

Broad thongs may be cut from other men’s leather. – Italian Proverb

Buy the bed of a great debtor. – Italian Proverb

Buy what you have no need of and ere long you shall sell your necessaries. – Italian Proverb

By asking for the impossible we obtain the best possible. – Italian Proverb

By asking the impossible you will get the best. – Italian Proverb

By lamplight every country wench seems handsome. – Italian Proverb

By learning to obey, you will know how to command. – Italian Proverb

By night all cats are black. – Italian Proverb

By their marks the bales are known. – Italian Proverb

Call me not olive before you see me gathered. – Italian Proverb

Call no man happy till he dies. – Italian Proverb

Call not a surgeon before you are wounded. – Italian Proverb

Cap in hand never did any harm. – Italian Proverb

Chastise the good and he will mend, chastise the bad and he will grow worse. – Italian Proverb

Children are poor men’s riches. – Italian Proverb

Choose neither a lover nor linen by candlelight. – Italian Proverb

Choose neither a woman nor linen by candlelight. – Italian Proverb

Choose neither a woman nor linen by candlelight. – Italian Proverb

Christmas comes but once a year. – Italian Proverb

Conscience is as good as a thousand witnesses. – Italian Proverb

Conscience is the chamber of justice. – Italian Proverb

Conscience makes cowards of us all. – Italian Proverb

Consolation, for the condemned, is to be one of many. – Italian Proverb

Corsairs against corsairs, there is nothing to win but empty barrels. – Italian Proverb

Counsel is nothing against love. – Italian Proverb

Cowards’ weapons neither cut nor pierce. – Italian Proverb

Credit is dead, bad pay killed it. – Italian Proverb

Credit lost is like a broken looking-glass. – Italian Proverb

Crimes may be secret, yet not secure. – Italian Proverb

Criminals are punished, that others may be amended. – Italian Proverb

Criticizing another’s garden doesn’t keep the weeds out of your own. – Italian Proverb

Crooked by nature is never made straight by education. – Italian Proverb

Crows weep for the dead lamb then devour him. – Italian Proverb

Cunning men’s cloaks sometimes fall. – Italian Proverb

Curses are like processions: they return to whence they set out. – Italian Proverb

Cut off the dog’s tail, he remains a dog. – Italian Proverb

Dearth foreseen never came. – Italian Proverb

Death will find me alive. – Italian Proverb

Delays are dangerous. – Italian Proverb

Deliberate before you act. – Italian Proverb

Different times different manners. – Italian Proverb

Dirty water does not wash clean. – Italian Proverb

Dirty water will quench fire. – Italian Proverb

Diseases are the visits of God. – Italian Proverb

Do good, and care not to whom. – Italian Proverb

Do no evil and have no fear. – Italian Proverb

Do not give the dog bread every time he wags his tail. – Italian Proverb

Do not judge of the ship from the land. – Italian Proverb

Do not sell sun in July. – Italian Proverb

Do what you ought, come what may. – Italian Proverb

Does your neighbor bore you? Lend him some money. – Italian Proverb

Does your neighbour love you? Lend him a sequin. – Italian Proverb

Dog does not eat dog. – Italian Proverb

Dog won’t eat dog. – Italian Proverb

Dogs bark at hose they don’t know. – Italian Proverb

Dogs bark, but the caravan goes on. – Italian Proverb

Don’t judge a horse by its harness. – Italian Proverb

Don’t believe in the saint unless he works miracles. – Italian Proverb

Don’t bite till you know whether it is bread or a stone. – Italian Proverb

Don’t break your shins on your neighbors’ pots. – Italian Proverb

Don’t cross the water unless you see the bottom. – Italian Proverb

Don’t cry fried fish before they are caught. – Italian Proverb

Don’t even take a bath with fools, because they’ll throw away the soap. – Italian Proverb

Don’t go a-fishing to a famous stream. – Italian Proverb

Don’t judge a horse by its harness. – Italian Proverb

Don’t let the peasant know how good the cheese with the pears is. – Italian Proverb

Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth. – Italian Proverb

Don’t mention the cross to the devil. – Italian Proverb

Don’t play with the bear if you don’t want to be bit. – Italian Proverb

Don’t put too tight a ring on your finger. – Italian Proverb

Don’t reckon your eggs before they are laid. – Italian Proverb

Don’t reject the good together with the bad. – Italian Proverb

Don’t sell the bearskin before you have caught the bear. – Italian Proverb

Dress up a stick and it does not appear to be a stick. – Italian Proverb

Drink water like an ox, wine like the king of Spain. – Italian Proverb

Drink wine and let water go to the mill. – Italian Proverb

Drop by drop wears away the stone. – Italian Proverb

Drop the jest when it is most amusing. – Italian Proverb

Eat and drink with your relatives, but do business with strangers. – Italian Proverb

Eaten bread is soon forgotten. – Italian Proverb

Eating and drinking Shouldn’t keep us from thinking. – Italian Proverb

Eating teaches drinking. – Italian Proverb

Eggs have no business dancing with stones. – Italian Proverb

Empty vessels make most noise. – Italian Proverb

Enough is enough, and too much spoils. – Italian Proverb

Entreat the churl and the bargain is broken off. – Italian Proverb

Error is no payment. – Italian Proverb

Even a fly has its anger. – Italian Proverb

Even a fly has its spleen. – Italian Proverb

Even a fool is thought wise if he keeps silent, and discerning if he holds his tongue. – Italian Proverb

Even a frog would bite if it had teeth. – Italian Proverb

Even a horse, though he has four feet, stumbles. – Italian Proverb

Even among the apostles there was a Judas. – Italian Proverb

Even an ass will not fall twice in the same quicksand. – Italian Proverb

Even counted sheep are eaten by the wolf. – Italian Proverb

Even foxes are caught. – Italian Proverb

Even old foxes are caught in the snare. – Italian Proverb

Even the dog gets bread by wagging his tail. – Italian Proverb

Even the fool says a wise word sometimes. – Italian Proverb

Even the just has need of help. – Italian Proverb

Even the sea. great as it is, grows calm. – Italian Proverb

Even woods have ears. – Italian Proverb

Evening red and morning grey help the traveler on his way; evening grey and morning red bring down rain upon his head. – Italian Proverb

Ever drunk, ever dry. – Italian Proverb

Ever homer sometimes nods. – Italian Proverb

Every bird thinks its own nest beautiful. – Italian Proverb

Every day has it night. – Italian Proverb

Every day is not a holiday. – Italian Proverb

Every ditch is full of after-wit. – Italian Proverb

Every ditch is full of your after-wits. – Italian Proverb

Every dog is a lion at home. – Italian Proverb

Every dog is allowed one bite. – Italian Proverb

Every door may be shut but death’s door. – Italian Proverb

Every excuse is good, if it works. – Italian Proverb

Every fool is wise when he holds his tongue. – Italian Proverb

Every fool wants to give advice. – Italian Proverb

Every fox likes a henroost. – Italian Proverb

Every glowworm is not a fire. – Italian Proverb

Every hill has its valley. – Italian Proverb

Every man has a fool in his sleeve. – Italian Proverb

Every man has a good wife and a bad trade. – Italian Proverb

Every man is nearest himself. – Italian Proverb

Every man is nearest himself. – Italian Proverb

Every medal has its reverse. – Italian Proverb

Every miller draws the water to his own mill. – Italian Proverb

Every monkey will have his gambols. – Italian Proverb

Every one can navigate in fine weather. – Italian Proverb

Every one draws the water to his own mill. – Italian Proverb

Every one finds fault with his own trade. – Italian Proverb

Every one for himself, and God for us all. – Italian Proverb

Every one gives himself credit for more brains than he has, and less money. – Italian Proverb

Every one goes with his own sack to the mill. – Italian Proverb

Every one knows best where the shoe pinches him. – Italian Proverb

Every one likes justice in another’s house, none in his own. – Italian Proverb

Every one praises his own saint. – Italian Proverb

Every one thinks he has more than his share of brains. – Italian Proverb

Every one thinks himself without sin because he has not those of others. – Italian Proverb

Every one to his own calling, and the ox to the plough. – Italian Proverb

Every potter praises his pot, and most of all the one that is cracked. – Italian Proverb

Every promise is a debt. – Italian Proverb

Every reed will not make a pipe. – Italian Proverb

Every rose has its thorn. – Italian Proverb

Every saint has his festival. – Italian Proverb

Every shop has its trick. – Italian Proverb

Every ten years one man has need of another. – Italian Proverb

Every time history repeats itself the price goes up. – Italian Proverb

Every time the sheep bleats it loseth a mouthful. – Italian Proverb

Every truth is not good to be told. – Italian Proverb

Every vine must have its stake. – Italian Proverb

Every wind does not shake down the nut. – Italian Proverb

Everybody’s friend, nobody’s friend. – Italian Proverb

Everyone loves justice in the affairs of another. – Italian Proverb

Everyone thinks his own cross is heaviest. – Italian Proverb

Everything is good for something. – Italian Proverb

Everything is good in its season. – Italian Proverb

Everything is of every year. – Italian Proverb

Everything may be borne except good fortune. – Italian Proverb

Everything may be repaired except the neckbone. – Italian Proverb

Everything must have a beginning. – Italian Proverb

Everything new is beautiful. – Italian Proverb

Evil be to him who evil thinks. – Italian Proverb

Evil communications corrupt good manners. – Italian Proverb

Evil does are evil dreaders. – Italian Proverb

Experience is more important than theory. – Italian Proverb

Experience is the mother of wisdom. – Italian Proverb

Experience is what you get when you didn’t get what you wanted. – Italian Proverb

Experience runs a valuable school, but fools learn in no other. – Italian Proverb

Experience without learning is better than learning without experience. – Italian Proverb

Extravagant offers are a kind of denial. – Italian Proverb

Facts are male, words are female. – Italian Proverb

Failures are but mileposts on the road to success. – Italian Proverb

Faint heart never won fair lady. – Italian Proverb

Fair promises bind fools. – Italian Proverb

Fair words won’t feed a cat. – Italian Proverb

Fair words, but look to your purse. – Italian Proverb

Faith in a lord, a cap for the fool. – Italian Proverb

Far from the eyes, far from the heart. – Italian Proverb

Fat head, less brains. – Italian Proverb

Fear guards the vineyard. – Italian Proverb

Feather by feather the goose is plucked. – Italian Proverb

February fill dyke, be it black or be it white. – Italian Proverb

Feed a cold and starve a fever. – Italian Proverb

Fine words don’t feed cats. – Italian Proverb

Fire drives the wasp out of its nest. – Italian Proverb

Fire is not quenched with fire. – Italian Proverb

Flies don’t light on a boiling pot. – Italian Proverb

Flies flock to the lean horse. – Italian Proverb

Foolish boys, wise men. – Italian Proverb

Fools give parties, sensible people go to them. – Italian Proverb

Fools grow without watering. – Italian Proverb

Fools live poor to die rich. – Italian Proverb

For a web begun God sends thread. – Italian Proverb

For a wife and a horse go to your neighbour. – Italian Proverb

For an honest man half his wits are enough; the whole is too little for a knave. – Italian Proverb

For extreme ills extreme remedies. – Italian Proverb

For the buyer a hundred eyes are too few, for the seller one is enough. – Italian Proverb

For the flying enemy a golden bridge. – Italian Proverb

Forbidden fruit is sweetest. – Italian Proverb

Fortune comes to him who strives for it. 

Fortune helps fools. – Italian Proverb

Fortune, and go to sleep. – Italian Proverb

Fortunes, heaven-born gifts. – Italian Proverb

Four eyes see more than two. – Italian Proverb

Friar Modest never was a prior. – Italian Proverb

Friends are known in time of need. – Italian Proverb

Friends are like fiddle-strings; they must not be screwed too tight. – Italian Proverb

Friends in need are friends indeed. – Italian Proverb

Friends may meet, but mountains never greet. – Italian Proverb

Friends tie their purses with a spider’s web. – Italian Proverb

Friendship should be unpicked, not rent. – Italian Proverb

Friendships are cheap when they can be brought by doffing the hat. – Italian Proverb

Frightened at bugbears. – Italian Proverb

From a bad paymaster take straw–i.e. any trifle. – Italian Proverb

From listening comes wisdom, and from speaking repentance. – Italian Proverb

From saying to doing is a long way. – Italian Proverb

From shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations. – Italian Proverb

From snow whether cooked or pounded you will get nothing but water. – Italian Proverb

From still water God keep me; from running water I will keep myself. – Italian Proverb

From the same flower the bee extracts honey and the wasp gall. – Italian Proverb

From those I trust God guard me, from those I mistrust I will guard myself. – Italian Proverb

Get a good name and go to sleep. – Italian Proverb

Get a name to rise early, and you may lie all day. – Italian Proverb

Gifts are often losses. – Italian Proverb

Give a clown your finger he’ll grasp your fist. – Italian Proverb

Give a dog an ill name, and you may as well hang him. – Italian Proverb

Give credit where credit is due. – Italian Proverb

Give neither counsel nor salt till you are asked for it. – Italian Proverb

Give the priest drink, for the clerk is thirsty. – Italian Proverb

Give the wise man a hint and leave him to act. – Italian Proverb

Give time time. – Italian Proverb

Give to him that has. – Italian Proverb

Give your friend a pig and your enemy a peach. – Italian Proverb

Giving is fishing. – Italian Proverb

Glowworms are not lanterns. – Italian Proverb

Gluttony kills more than the sword. – Italian Proverb

Gnaw the bone which is fallen to thy lot. – Italian Proverb

Go abroad and you’ll hear news of home. – Italian Proverb

Go early to market and as late as you can to battle. – Italian Proverb

Go softly at bad bits of road. – Italian Proverb

Go to the sea if you would fish well. – Italian Proverb

Go to the square and ask advice; go home and do what you like. – Italian Proverb

God gives a curst one short horns. – Italian Proverb

God heals and the doctor has the thanks. – Italian Proverb

God helps him who helps himself. – Italian Proverb

God keep me from my friends, from my enemies I will keep myself. – Italian Proverb

God preserve you from one who eats without drinking. – Italian Proverb

God protect us from him who has read but one book. – Italian Proverb

God save me from a bad neighbor and a beginner on the fiddle. – Italian Proverb

God save me from him who has but one occupation. – Italian Proverb

God save me from him who studies but one book. – Italian Proverb

God save me from one who does not drink. – Italian Proverb

God save us from the enriched poor and from the impoverished rich. – Italian Proverb

God save you from a bad neighbour, and from a beginner on the fiddle. – Italian Proverb

God sends cold according to the clothes. – Italian Proverb

God sends nothing but what can be borne. – Italian Proverb

God sends us the meat, but it is the Devil who sends us cooks. – Italian Proverb

Gold does not buy everything. – Italian Proverb

Gold is the devil’s fishhook. – Italian Proverb

Good bargains empty the purse. – Italian Proverb

Good blood never lies. – Italian Proverb

Good company on the road is the shortest of short cuts. – Italian Proverb

Good is good, but better beats it. – Italian Proverb

Good or bad we must all live. – Italian Proverb

Good repute is like the cypress: once cut, it never puts forth leaf again. – Italian Proverb

Good riding at two anchors men have told, For it one break, the other yet may hold. – Italian Proverb

Good swimmers are drowned at last. – Italian Proverb

Good ware was never dear. – Italian Proverb

Good watch prevents misfortune. – Italian Proverb

Good wine makes good blood. – Italian Proverb

Good wine needs no bush. – Italian Proverb

Gratitude is the memory of the heart. – Italian Proverb

Grease to the wheels. – Italian Proverb

Great cry and little wool, as the man said who shaved the sow. – Italian Proverb

Great griefs are mute. – Italian Proverb

Great smoke, little roast. – Italian Proverb

Greater fools than they of Zago, who dunged the steeple to make it grow. – Italian Proverb

Grief for a dead wife lasts to the door. – Italian Proverb

Grief pent up will burst the heart. – Italian Proverb

Half a brain is enough for him who says little. – Italian Proverb

Handsome is not what is handsome, but what pleases. – Italian Proverb

Handsome women generally fall to the lot of ugly men. – Italian Proverb

Happiness that lasts too long spoils the heart. – Italian Proverb

Happy is she who is in love with an old dotard. – Italian Proverb

Happy is the bride that the sun shines on. – Italian Proverb

Happy is the country which has no history. – Italian Proverb

Hard is a new law imposed on old licence. – Italian Proverb

Hard upon hard never made a good wall. – Italian Proverb

Hard with hard makes not the stone wall. – Italian Proverb

Hard words break no bones. – Italian Proverb

Hard work never did anyone any harm. – Italian Proverb

Harm watch, harm catch. – Italian Proverb

Hasty climbers have sudden falls. – Italian Proverb

Hatred renewed is worse than at first. – Italian Proverb

Have an open face, but conceal your thoughts. – Italian Proverb

Have luck, and sleep. – Italian Proverb

Have not all your eggs in one nest. – Italian Proverb

Have two strings to your bow. – Italian Proverb

He begins to grow bad who believes himself good. – Italian Proverb

He cannot lead a good life who serves without wages. – Italian Proverb

He conquers who endures. – Italian Proverb

He cries out before he is hurt. – Italian Proverb

He cries wine, and sells vinegar. – Italian Proverb

He dances well to whom fortune pipes. – Italian Proverb

He devil is not so ugly as he is painted. – Italian Proverb

He devil tempts all, but the idle man tempts the devil. – Italian Proverb

He gains a great deal who loses a vain hope. – Italian Proverb

He gains much who loses a vain hope. – Italian Proverb

He gives twice who gives in a trice. – Italian Proverb

He got out of the mud and fell into the river. – Italian Proverb

He hangs the May-branch at every door. – Italian Proverb

He has done like the Perugian who, when his head was broken, ran home for his helmet. – Italian Proverb

He has gained enough who gives up a vain hope. – Italian Proverb

He hauls at a long rope who expects another’s death. – Italian Proverb

He is a fool who boasts of four things: that he has good wine, a good horse, a handsome wife, and plenty of money. – Italian Proverb

He is a fool who does not know from what quarter the wind blows. – Italian Proverb

He is a fool who loses the flight for the leap. – Italian Proverb

He is a fool who thinks that another does not think. – Italian Proverb

He is a friend when you sneeze – – all he says is “God bless you.” – Italian Proverb

He is a good dog who goes to church. – Italian Proverb

He is a sorry barber who has but one comb. – Italian Proverb

He is a very sorry barber who has but one comb. – Italian Proverb

He is happy that knows not himself to be otherwise. – Italian Proverb

He is in no place who is everywhere. – Italian Proverb

He is in search of a ram with five feet. – Italian Proverb

He is like the anchor that is always in the sea, yet does not learn to swim. – Italian Proverb

He is master of another man’s life who is indifferent to his own. – Italian Proverb

He is miserable indeed that must lock up his miseries. – Italian Proverb

He is miserable once, who feels it; but twice, who fear it before it comes. – Italian Proverb

He is not a good mason who refuses any stone. – Italian Proverb

He is not a man who cannot say no. – Italian Proverb

He is not a thorough wise man who cannot play the fool on occasion. – Italian Proverb

He is not a wise man who cannot play the fool on occasion. – Italian Proverb

He is not an honest man who has burned his tongue and does not tell the company that the soup is hot. – Italian Proverb

He is not free who drags his chain after him. – Italian Proverb

He is not happy who knows it not. – Italian Proverb

He is not poor that hath not much, but he that craves much. – Italian Proverb

He is rich enough who does not want. – Italian Proverb

He is rich who owes nothing. – Italian Proverb

He is the world’s master who despises it, its slave who prizes it. – Italian Proverb

He is very blind who cannot see the sun. – Italian Proverb

He is washing the crow. – Italian Proverb

He is well constituted who grieves not for what he has not, and rejoices for what he has. – Italian Proverb

He is wise who learns at another’s cost. – Italian Proverb

He knocks boldly at the door who brings good news. – Italian Proverb

He knows well where the thorn pricks him. – Italian Proverb

He knows where the devil carries his tail. – Italian Proverb

He knows where the devil has his tail. – Italian Proverb

He laughs well who laughs last. – Italian Proverb

He loves well who does not forget. – Italian Proverb

He may lie safely who comes from afar. – Italian Proverb

He measures others with his own yard. – Italian Proverb

He must stoop that has a low door. – Italian Proverb

He ought not to complain of the sea who returns to it a second time. – Italian Proverb

He preaches well who lives well. – Italian Proverb

He runs far who never turns. – Italian Proverb

He saith little that loveth much. – Italian Proverb

He sells the bird on the branch. – Italian Proverb

He sets the wolf to guard the sheep. – Italian Proverb

He takes out a nail and puts in a pin. – Italian Proverb

He that at twenty is not, at thirty knows not, and at forty has not, will never be, nor ever know, nor ever have. – Italian Proverb

He that buys the office of magistrate must of necessity sell justice. – Italian Proverb

He that by the plough would thrive, Himself must either hold or drive. – Italian Proverb

He that exceeds his commission must answer for it at his own cost. – Italian Proverb

He that flatters you more than you desire either has deceived you or wishes to deceive. – Italian Proverb

He that has a head of glass must not throw stones at another. – Italian Proverb

He that has but one pig easily fattens it. – Italian Proverb

He that has swallowed the devil may swallow his horns. – Italian Proverb

He that has time, has life. – Italian Proverb

He that is afraid of the devil does not grow rich. – Italian Proverb

He that is always right is always wrong. – Italian Proverb

He that is born to be hanged shall never be drowned. – Italian Proverb

He that is busy is tempted but by one devil, he that is idle by a legion. – Italian Proverb

He that is drowning shouts though he be not heard. – Italian Proverb

He that is drunk is gone from home. – Italian Proverb

He that is good for something is the ass of the public. – Italian Proverb

He that is in fault is in suspicion. – Italian Proverb

He that is kinder than he was wont hath a design upon thee. – Italian Proverb

He that jokes, confesses. – Italian Proverb

He that keepeth his mouth keepeth his life; but he that openeth wide his lips shall have destruction. – Italian Proverb

He that keeps another man’s dog shall have nothing left him but the line. – Italian Proverb

He that makes himself dirt is trod on by the swine. – Italian Proverb

He that marries a widow with four children marries four thieves. – Italian Proverb

He that never fails never grows rich. – Italian Proverb

He that paints a flower does not give it perfume. – Italian Proverb

He that passeth by, and meddleth with strife belonging not to him, is like one that taketh a dog by the ears. – Italian Proverb

He that reckons without his host must reckon again. – Italian Proverb

He that refuseth praise the first time does it because he would have it the second. – Italian Proverb

He that repairs not a part, builds all. – Italian Proverb

He that rewards flattery, begs it. – Italian Proverb

He that runs fast will not run long. – Italian Proverb

He that seeks to have many friends never has any. – Italian Proverb

He that seeks, finds, and sometimes what he would rather not. – Italian Proverb

He that shows his money shows his judgment. – Italian Proverb

He that shows his passion, tells his enemy where he may hit him. – Italian Proverb

He that stands may fall. – Italian Proverb

He that wants should not be bashful. – Italian Proverb

He that will not strive in this world should not have come into it. – Italian Proverb

He that would be ill served should keep plenty of servants. – Italian Proverb

He that would beat his dog can easily find a stick. – Italian Proverb

He that would have a thing done quickly and well must do it himself. – Italian Proverb

He that would have eggs must endure the cackling of hens. – Italian Proverb

He that would have the fruit, must climb the tree. – Italian Proverb

He that would heal a wound must not handle it. – Italian Proverb

He wastes his tears who weeps before the judge. – Italian Proverb

He who begins ill finishes worse. – Italian Proverb

He who begins many things, finishes but few. – Italian Proverb

He who blows dust fills his eyes with it. – Italian Proverb

He who builds a house in the market-place, builds either too high or too low. – Italian Proverb

He who builds by the roadside has many surveyors. – Italian Proverb

He who builds on another’s ground loses his stone and mortar. – Italian Proverb

He who buys betimes buys cheaply. – Italian Proverb

He who buys by the pennyworth keeps his own house and other men’s too. – Italian Proverb

He who buys the broom can also buy the handle. – Italian Proverb

He who buys what he cannot pay for, sells what he would rather not. – Italian Proverb

He who can wait obtains what he wishes. – Italian Proverb

He who cannot revenge himself is weak, he who will not is contemptible. – Italian Proverb

He who chastises one threatens a hundred. – Italian Proverb

He who climbs to high is near a fall. – Italian Proverb

He who decries, wants to buy. – Italian Proverb

He who demands does not command. – Italian Proverb

He who denies all confesses all. – Italian Proverb

He who does as he likes has no headache. – Italian Proverb

He who does many bad deeds can expect a big one in return. – Italian Proverb

He who does not when he can, cannot when he will. – Italian Proverb

He who does the wrong forgets it, but not he who receives it. – Italian Proverb

He who doth his own business defileth not his fingers. – Italian Proverb

He who doth the injury never forgives the injured man. – Italian Proverb

He who eats alone dies alone. – Italian Proverb

He who eats pears with his master should not choose the best. – Italian Proverb

He who enjoys good health is rich, though he knows it not. – Italian Proverb

He who esteems none but himself is as happy as a king. – Italian Proverb

He who excuses, accuses himself. – Italian Proverb

He who fails to plan, plans to fail. – Italian Proverb

He who gives bread to others’ dogs is often barked at by his own. – Italian Proverb

He who gives fair words feeds you with an empty spoon. – Italian Proverb

He who goes not into battle cannot wear a crown. – Italian Proverb

He who goes slowly goes safely and goes far. – Italian Proverb

He who goes to the mill gets befloured. – Italian Proverb

He who grasps too much holds nothing fast. – Italian Proverb

He who guesses well prophesies well. – Italian Proverb

He who has a bad name is half hanged. – Italian Proverb

He who has a bad tongue should have good loins. – Italian Proverb

He who has a glass roof should not throw stones at his neighbour’s. – Italian Proverb

He who has a good horse in his stable may go on foot. – Italian Proverb

He who has a good neighbour has a good morning. – Italian Proverb

He who has a head won’t want for a hat. – Italian Proverb

He who has a mate has a master. – Italian Proverb

He who has a mind to beat a dog will easily find a stick. – Italian Proverb

He who has a straw tail is always in fear of its catching fire. – Italian Proverb

He who has a tongue, may go to Rome. – Italian Proverb

He who has been stung by a serpent is afraid of a lizard. – Italian Proverb

He who has crossed the ford knows how deep it is. – Italian Proverb

He who has his own mother never cries. – Italian Proverb

He who has land has war. – Italian Proverb

He who has loaves has dogs. – Italian Proverb

He who has money finds many cousins. – Italian Proverb

He who has money to throw away, let him employ workmen, and not stand by. – Italian Proverb

He who has no patience, has nothing at all. – Italian Proverb

He who has nothing, lacks nothing. – Italian Proverb

He who has scalded himself once blows the next time. – Italian Proverb

He who has teeth has no bread, and he who has bread has no teeth. – Italian Proverb

He who has the Pope for a cousin soon becomes a Cardinal. – Italian Proverb

He who has, is. – Italian Proverb

He who hath an ill name is half hanged. – Italian Proverb

He who holds a ladder is as bad as the thief. – Italian Proverb

He who hunts two hares does not catch the one and lets the other escape. – Italian Proverb

He who in under cover when it rains is a great fool if he stirs. – Italian Proverb

He who is an ass and takes himself to be a stag finds his mistake when he comes to leap the ditch. – Italian Proverb

He who is an ass and thinks himself a stag, finds his mistake when he comes to leap the ditch. – Italian Proverb

He who is born with a weak intellect and a goiter can never be cured. – Italian Proverb

He who is embarked with the devil must make the passage in his company. – Italian Proverb

He who is guilty believes that all men speak ill of him. – Italian Proverb

He who is in hell knows not what heaven is. – Italian Proverb

He who is meant to be a basket-carrier is born with the handle in his hand. – Italian Proverb

He who is not impatient is not in love. – Italian Proverb

He who is of the craft can discourse about it. – Italian Proverb

He who is the cause of his own misfortune may bewail it himself. – Italian Proverb

He who is the offender is never the forgiver. – Italian Proverb

He who is unable is always willing. – Italian Proverb

He who is without debt is without credit. – Italian Proverb

He who knows but little quickly tells it. – Italian Proverb

He who knows little knows enough if he knows how to hold his tongue. – Italian Proverb

He who knows little quickly tells it. – Italian Proverb

He who knows nothing doubts nothing. – Italian Proverb

He who knows nothing knows enough, if he knows how to be silent. – Italian Proverb

He who knows nothing never doubts. – Italian Proverb

He who knows the road can ride full trot. – Italian Proverb

He who laughs last laughs best. – Italian Proverb

He who laughs overmuch may have an aching heart. – Italian Proverb

He who laughs too much, is hiding his grief. – Italian Proverb

He who lets the goat be laid on his shoulders is soon after forced to carry the cow. – Italian Proverb

He who likes drinking is always talking of wine. – Italian Proverb

He who lives among wolves learns to howl. – Italian Proverb

He who lives by hope will die by hunger. – Italian Proverb

He who lives by the sword dies by the sword. – Italian Proverb

He who looks on has two-thirds of the game. – Italian Proverb

He who loses is always in fault. – Italian Proverb

He who makes an idol of his interest makes a martyr of his integrity. – Italian Proverb

He who makes himself a dove is eaten by the hawk. – Italian Proverb

He who makes himself a servant is expected to remain a servant. – Italian Proverb

He who meddles in others people’s affairs will be left with two of three parts. – Italian Proverb

He who mentions Siena mentions the Palio. – Italian Proverb

He who never begins will never end. – Italian Proverb

He who offends writes on sand, he who is offended on marble. – Italian Proverb

He who pays well is master of another man’s purse. – Italian Proverb

He who perseveres wins at last. – Italian Proverb

He who praises himself befouls himself. – Italian Proverb

He who risks nothing can gain nothing. – Italian Proverb

He who says nothing never lies. – Italian Proverb

He who says what he likes shall hear what he does not like. – Italian Proverb

He who scrubs the head of an ass wastes his soap. – Italian Proverb

He who serves the public has a sorry master. – Italian Proverb

He who serves two masters must lie to one of them. – Italian Proverb

He who sings drives away sorrow. – Italian Proverb

He who sleeps catches no fish. – Italian Proverb

He who sleeps well does not feel the fleas. – Italian Proverb

He who speaks to your face is not a traitor. – Italian Proverb

He who succeeds is reputed wise. – Italian Proverb

He who sups with the devil must have a long spoon. – Italian Proverb

He who sups with the Devil should have a long spoon. – Italian Proverb

He who suspects is seldom at fault. – Italian Proverb

He who swears is a liar. – Italian Proverb

He who sweats more in peace, bleeds less in war. – Italian Proverb

He who takes a woman gives away his freedom. – Italian Proverb

He who teaches often learns himself. – Italian Proverb

He who tells his own affairs will hardly keep secret those of others. – Italian Proverb

He who thinks badly commits a sin but hits the mark. – Italian Proverb

He who throws away money with his hands will seek it with his feet. – Italian Proverb

He who touches pitch defiles himself. – Italian Proverb

He who wants his dog killed has only to say he’s mad. – Italian Proverb

He who wants milk should not sit in the middle of a field and wait for a cow to back up to him. – Italian Proverb

He who wants too much doesn’t catch anything. – Italian Proverb

He who will not serve one master must needs serve many. – Italian Proverb

He who works by himself does the work of three people. – Italian Proverb

He who works by himself does the work of three. – Italian Proverb

He who would be long an old man must begin betimes. – Italian Proverb

He who would be rich in a year gets hanged in six months. – Italian Proverb

He who would enjoy the feast should fast on the eve. – Italian Proverb

He who would have clear water should go to the fountain head. – Italian Proverb

He who would relish his food must not see it cooked. – Italian Proverb

He who would rest must work. – Italian Proverb

He who would stop every man’s mouth must have a great deal of meal. – Italian Proverb

He who wrongs someone has to expect something in retaliation. – Italian Proverb

He would be a good one to send for death. – Italian Proverb

He would break his neck against a straw. – Italian Proverb

He would drown in a spoonful of water. – Italian Proverb

He would not give the devil a knife to cut his throat. – Italian Proverb

He would sell even his share of the sun. – Italian Proverb

He would skin a flint. – Italian Proverb

He would slaughter a bug to drink its blood. – Italian Proverb

Health without money is a half-malady. – Italian Proverb

Hear the other side, and believe little. – Italian Proverb

Hear, see, and say nothing if you would live in peace. – Italian Proverb

Hedges have no eyes, but they have ears. – Italian Proverb

Hell and Chancery are always open. – Italian Proverb

Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. – Italian Proverb

Hell is crowded with ungrateful wretches. – Italian Proverb

Help you to salt. help you to sorrow. – Italian Proverb

He’s a friend at sneezing-time–the most that can be got from him is a “God bless you.” – Italian Proverb

He’s a wise man that leads passion by the bridle. – Italian Proverb

He’s an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers. – Italian Proverb

Hide not the truth from your confessor, your doctor, or your lawyer. – Italian Proverb

High birth is a poor dish on the table. – Italian Proverb

Home, dear home, small as thou art, to me thou art a palace. – Italian Proverb

Homer sometimes nods. – Italian Proverb

Honest men marry soon, wise men never. – Italian Proverb

Honours change manners. – Italian Proverb

Hope is the last thing ever lost. – Italian Proverb

Hope is the last to abandon the unhappy. – Italian Proverb

Hour by hour time departs. – Italian Proverb

How can the cat help it if the maid be a fool? – Italian Proverb

Hunger drives the wolf out of the wood. – Italian Proverb

Hunger is the best sauce. – Italian Proverb

Hunger makes hard beans sweet. – Italian Proverb

Hunger transmutes beans into almonds. – Italian Proverb

I being satisfied, the world is satisfied. – Italian Proverb

I may have lost the ring, but I still have the fingers. – Italian Proverb

I might have lost my ring, but I still have my fingers! – Italian Proverb

I protect myself from my enemies; may God protect me from my friends. – Italian Proverb

I saw you at Lucca, I knew you at Pisa. – Italian Proverb

I speak to you, daughter; hear it daughter-in-law. – Italian Proverb

I too can lead the geese to water when it rains. – Italian Proverb

I will do what I can, and a little less, to be able to continue at it. – Italian Proverb

If a fox is preaching, beware of your geese. – Italian Proverb

If a fox is preaching, then beware of your geese. – Italian Proverb

If a man deceives me once, shame on him; if he deceives me twice, shame on me. – Italian Proverb

If every man would sweep before his own door, the city would soon be clean. – Italian Proverb

If I have lost the ring I still have the fingers. – Italian Proverb

If I sleep, I sleep for myself; if I work, I know not for whom. – Italian Proverb

If I went to sea I should find it dry. – Italian Proverb

If it rained macaroni, what a fine time for gluttons. – Italian Proverb

If it rained maccaroni, what a fine time for gluttons. – Italian Proverb

If it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, looks like a duck, it must be a duck. – Italian Proverb

If it were not for hope, the heart would break. – Italian Proverb

If it were not for the belly, the back might wear gold. – Italian Proverb

If it’s not one thing, it’s another. – Italian Proverb

If it’s not true, it’s a good story. – Italian Proverb

If only I were a bird! Ah, but eating caterpillars? If someone betrays you once, it’s his fault. If he betrays you twice, it’s your fault. – Italian Proverb

If pride were a disease, how many would be already dead? – Italian Proverb

If pride were an art, how many doctors we should have. – Italian Proverb

If someone betrays you once, it’s his fault. If he betrays you twice, it’s your fault. – Italian Proverb

If the blind lead the blind, both fall into the ditch. – Italian Proverb

If the hen had not cackled, we should not know she had laid an egg. – Italian Proverb

If the hours are long enough and the pay is short enough, someone will say it’s women’s work. – Italian Proverb

If the patient dies, the doctor has killed him, but if he gets well, the saints have saved him. – Italian Proverb

If the secret sorrows of everyone could be read on their forehead, how many who now cause envy would suddenly become the objects of pity. – Italian Proverb

If the sun shines on me I care not for the moon. – Italian Proverb

If the wife sins, the husband is not innocent. – Italian Proverb

If the young man knew, if the old man could, there is nothing but would be done. – Italian Proverb

If you are a mouse don’t follow frogs. – Italian Proverb

If you are determined – – just do it. – Italian Proverb

If you can’t bite, don’t show your teeth. – Italian Proverb

If you dig a pit for others, you might fall into it yourself! – Italian Proverb

If you have a good cellar at home don’t go drinking at the tavern. – Italian Proverb

If you let them put the calf on your shoulders, it will not be long before they clap on the cow. – Italian Proverb

If you scatter thorns, don’t go barefoot. – Italian Proverb

If you stumble more than once over the same stump, you have no one to blame but yourself. – Italian Proverb

If you throw money away with your hands, you will seek it later with your feet. – Italian Proverb

If you want the daughter, you must kiss the mother. – Italian Proverb

If you want to buy love, love itself is the price you’ll have to pay. – Italian Proverb

If you would be rich in a year, you may be hanged in six months. – Italian Proverb

If you would have your work ill done, pay beforehand. – Italian Proverb

If you would succeed, you must not be too good. – Italian Proverb

If young men had wit and old men strength everything might be well done. – Italian Proverb

If your head is wax, do not walk in the sun. – Italian Proverb

If youth but knew and age but could do. – Italian Proverb

Ignorance is a voluntary misfortune. – Italian Proverb

Ill in kine and worse in beeves. – Italian Proverb

Ill luck comes by pounds and goes away by ounces. – Italian Proverb

Ill news comes apace. – Italian Proverb

Ill news travels fast. – Italian Proverb

Ill weeds grow apace. – Italian Proverb

Illness tells us what we are. – Italian Proverb

Imagination gallops, judgment merely walks. – Italian Proverb

In a golden sheath a leaden knife. – Italian Proverb

In a thousand pounds of law there is not one ounce of love. – Italian Proverb

In a world of blind people, a one-eyed man is king. – Italian Proverb

In at one ear and out at the other. – Italian Proverb

In men every mortal sin is venial, in women every venial sin is mortal. – Italian Proverb

In prosperity no altars smoke. – Italian Proverb

In the country of the blind blessed is he that hath one eye. – Italian Proverb

In the country of the blind the one eyed man is king. – Italian Proverb

In the fray the weak are strong. – Italian Proverb

In the war of love who flies conquers. – Italian Proverb

In war time there is pay for every horse. – Italian Proverb

In wine there is truth. – Italian Proverb

Injurious is the gift that takes away freedom. – Italian Proverb

Injury is to be measured by malice. – Italian Proverb

Into the mouth of a wolf. – Italian Proverb

It is a bad game where nobody wins. – Italian Proverb

It is a bad thing to be a knave, but worse to be known for one. – Italian Proverb

It is a bad thing to be poor, and seem poor. – Italian Proverb

It is a good answer which knows when to stop. – Italian Proverb

It is a good file that cuts iron without making a noise. – Italian Proverb

It is a good horse that never stumbles, And a good wife that never grumbles. – Italian Proverb

It is a sorry house where the hens crow and the cock is silent. – Italian Proverb

It is all one whether you die of sickness or of love. – Italian Proverb

It is always good to have two strings to your bow. – Italian Proverb

It is better if you could say “Here he ran away” than “Here he was killed.” – Italian Proverb

It is better to be a beggar than a fool. – Italian Proverb

It is better to be condemned by many doctors than by one judge. – Italian Proverb

It is better to give away the wool than the sheep. – Italian Proverb

It is better to have a husband without love than jealous. – Italian Proverb

It is better to hear the nightingale sing than the mouse gnaw. – Italian Proverb

It is better to irritate a dog than an old woman. – Italian Proverb

It is better to leave than to lack. – Italian Proverb

It is better to lose the saddle than the horse. – Italian Proverb

It is better to ride a donkey that carries you than a horse that throws you. – Italian Proverb

It is better to wear out one’s shoes than one’s sheets. – Italian Proverb

It is easier to threaten than to kill. – Italian Proverb

It is easy robbing when the dog is quieted. – Italian Proverb

It is easy to find a stick to beat a dog. – Italian Proverb

It is easy to frighten the bull from the window. – Italian Proverb

It is easy to give advice when all goes well. – Italian Proverb

It is easy to preach fasting with a fully belly. – Italian Proverb

It is easy to threaten a bull from a window. – Italian Proverb

It is good living under the shadow of the belfry. – Italian Proverb

It is good to buy when another wants to sell. – Italian Proverb

It is good to have friends everywhere. – Italian Proverb

It is good to hold the clothes of one who is swimming. – Italian Proverb

It is in vain to lay a net in sight of the birds. – Italian Proverb

It is no time to play chess when the house is on fire. – Italian Proverb

It is no use crying over spilt milk. – Italian Proverb

It is not by saying, ‘honey, honey,’ that sweetness comes into the mouth. – Italian Proverb

It is not easy to show the way to a blind man. – Italian Proverb

It is not easy to steal in thieves’ houses. – Italian Proverb

It is not enough to aim, you must hit. – Italian Proverb

It is not enough to aim.; you must hit. – Italian Proverb

It is not enough to aim; you must hit. – Italian Proverb

It is not enough to know how to steal, one must know also how to conceal. – Italian Proverb

It is not every flower that smells sweet. – Italian Proverb

It is not for the blind to give an opinion on colors. – Italian Proverb

It is not honour for an eagle to vanquish a dove. – Italian Proverb

It is not necessary to fish up every bucket that falls into the well. – Italian Proverb

It is not spring until you can plant your foot upon twelve daisies. – Italian Proverb

It is not the long day, but the heart that does the work. – Italian Proverb

It is the blood of the soldier that makes the general great. – Italian Proverb

It is the first shower that wets. – Italian Proverb

It is the petty expenses that empty the purse. – Italian Proverb

It is the small expenses that empty your purse. – Italian Proverb

It is too late to come with water when the house is burnt down. – Italian Proverb

It is truth that makes a many angry. – Italian Proverb

It is vain to fish if the hook is not baited. – Italian Proverb

It may be quieter to sleep alone, but not warmer. – Italian Proverb

It never thunders but it rains. – Italian Proverb

It takes four living men to carry one dead man out of a house. – Italian Proverb

It’s no time to play chess when the house is on fire. – Italian Proverb

Italy will take care of itself. – Italian Proverb

It’s a bad mouthful that chokes. – Italian Proverb

It’s a bad plan that cannot be changed. – Italian Proverb

It’s a foolish sheep that makes the wolf its confessor. – Italian Proverb

It’s a free country. – Italian Proverb

It’s a good answer that knows when to stop. – Italian Proverb

It’s a very proud horse that will not carry his oats. – Italian Proverb

It’s no time to play chess when the house is on fire. – Italian Proverb

It’s the merry drizzle that makes grass grow fine. – Italian Proverb

Keep company with good men, and you’ll increase their number. – Italian Proverb

Keep your mouth shut and your ears open. – Italian Proverb

Keep yourself from opportunities and God will keep you from sins. – Italian Proverb

Keeping from falling is better then helping up. – Italian Proverb

Kin or no kin, woe to him who has nothing. – Italian Proverb

Knowledge has bitter roots but sweet fruits. – Italian Proverb

Large trees give more shade than fruit. – Italian Proverb

Lasses and glasses are always in danger. – Italian Proverb

Laughter makes good blood. – Italian Proverb

Laws were made for rogues. – Italian Proverb

Lawyers’ robes are lined with the obstinacy of suitors. – Italian Proverb

Lay it on thick and some of it will stick. – Italian Proverb

Lay on more wood; ashes give money. – Italian Proverb

Learned fools are the greatest fools. – Italian Proverb

Leave no nail unclenched. – Italian Proverb

Lent, which seems so long, is short at other men’s tables. – Italian Proverb

Let every fox take care of his own tail. – Italian Proverb

Let every one keep off the flies with his own tail. – Italian Proverb

Let him not be a lover who has not courage. – Italian Proverb

Let him who is well off stay where he is. – Italian Proverb

Let not you shirt know your secret. – Italian Proverb

Let not your shirt know all your thoughts. – Italian Proverb

Let not your tongue say what your head may pay for. – Italian Proverb

Let the injurer not forget. – Italian Proverb

Let us first catch the bear and then sell its skin. – Italian Proverb

Let us have florins and we shall find cousins. – Italian Proverb

Let well alone. – Italian Proverb

Liars should have good memories. – Italian Proverb

Lies have short legs. – Italian Proverb

Life is half spent before we know what it is. – Italian Proverb

Like lips, like lettuce. – Italian Proverb

Like master, like man. – Italian Proverb

Like saint like offering. – Italian Proverb

Like well like bucket. – Italian Proverb

Like will to like, as the devil said to the collier. – Italian Proverb

Likeness is the mother of love. – Italian Proverb

Lilies are whitest in a blackmoor’s hand. – Italian Proverb

Lip courtesy pleases much and costs little. – Italian Proverb

Little children and headaches, great children and heartaches. – Italian Proverb

Little thieves are hanged by the neck, great ones by the purse. – Italian Proverb

Live and learn. – Italian Proverb

Live and let live. – Italian Proverb

Long tongue, short hand. – Italian Proverb

Look before you leap. – Italian Proverb

Look for the hog at the oak. – Italian Proverb

Look high and fall low. – Italian Proverb

Look not a gift horse in the mouth. – Italian Proverb

Look not out for dead men’s shoes. – Italian Proverb

Look with suspicion on the flight of an enemy. – Italian Proverb

Lookers-on see most of the game. – Italian Proverb

Love and lordship like no fellowship. – Italian Proverb

Love begins with song and music and ends in a sea of tears. – Italian Proverb

Love demands faith, and faith firmness. – Italian Proverb

Love is an excuse for its own faults. – Italian Proverb

Love is blind but sees afar. – Italian Proverb

Love is master of all arts. – Italian Proverb

Love is the true price at which love is bought. – Italian Proverb

Love kills time and time kills love. – Italian Proverb

Love knows not labour. – Italian Proverb

Love levels all inequalities. – Italian Proverb

Love me little and love me long. – Italian Proverb

Love me love my dog. – Italian Proverb

Love rules his kingdom without a sword. – Italian Proverb

Love rules without law. – Italian Proverb

Love rules without rules. – Italian Proverb

Love your friend with his faults. – Italian Proverb

Love, a cough, and smoke, are hard to hide. – Italian Proverb

Love, should i escape your snares, i doubt that i can be trapped by any other means. – Italian Proverb

Lovers’ purses are tied with cobwebs. – Italian Proverb

Lovers think others are blind. – Italian Proverb

Love’s merchandise is jealousy and broken faith. – Italian Proverb

Made thirthy, we should make thirty-one. – Italian Proverb

Make me a prophet and I will make you rich. – Italian Proverb

Make yourself a sheep and the wolf will eat you. – Italian Proverb

Make yourself honey and the flies will eat you. – Italian Proverb

Many a one leaves the roast who afterwards longs for the smoke of it. – Italian Proverb

Many a one threatens and yet is afraid. – Italian Proverb

Many a true word is spoken in jest. – Italian Proverb

Many are brave when the enemy flies. – Italian Proverb

Many are called but few are chosen. – Italian Proverb

Many desire the tree who pretend to refuse the fruit. – Italian Proverb

Many kiss the hand they wish to cut off. – Italian Proverb

Many people can pack the cards; fewer can play the game. – Italian Proverb

Many pupils have gained more wealth than their masters. – Italian Proverb

Many return from the war who cannot give an account of the battle. – Italian Proverb

Many scruple to spit in church, and afterwards defile the altar. – Italian Proverb

Many stop their noses at ambergris. – Italian Proverb

Marriages are not as they are made, but as they turn out. – Italian Proverb

Marry in haste, repent at leisure. – Italian Proverb

Marry your son when you please, your daughter when you can. – Italian Proverb

Marry your son when you will, your daughter when you can. – Italian Proverb

Masters’ hints are commands. – Italian Proverb

Measure three times and cut once. – Italian Proverb

Men after the modern fashion, and asses after the ancient. – Italian Proverb

Men are as old as they feel, women as old as they look. – Italian Proverb

Men are as old as they fell, and women as they look. – Italian Proverb

Men make wealth, and women preserve it. – Italian Proverb

Mills and wives are ever wanting. – Italian Proverb

Misfortune does not always result in harm. – Italian Proverb

Misfortunes never come single. – Italian Proverb

Misfortunes that can’t be avoided must be sweetened. – Italian Proverb

Misfortunes, when asleep, are not to be awakened. – Italian Proverb

Moderate profits fill the purse. – Italian Proverb

Moderation in all things. – Italian Proverb

Money and friendship break the arms of justice. – Italian Proverb

Money begets money. – Italian Proverb

Money is an epitome of human power. – Italian Proverb

Money is money’s brother. – Italian Proverb

Money is round, and rolls. – Italian Proverb

More unlucky than dogs in church. – Italian Proverb

Mother-in-law and daughter-in-law, storm and hail. – Italian Proverb

Mouth shut and eyes open. – Italian Proverb

Much smoke, and little roast. – Italian Proverb

Much water passes by the mill that the miller perceives not. – Italian Proverb

Muddy water won’t do for a mirror. – Italian Proverb

My No is as good as your Yes. – Italian Proverb

Near is my petticoat but nearer is my smock. – Italian Proverb

Near is my shirt, but nearer is my skin. – Italian Proverb

Near the church far from God. – Italian Proverb

Necessity and opportunity may make a coward valiant. – Italian Proverb

Necessity becomes will. – Italian Proverb

Necessity has no law. – Italian Proverb

Necessity is a great teacher. – Italian Proverb

Necessity is a great teacher. – Italian Proverb

Neither women nor linen by candlelight. – Italian Proverb

Never do evil that good may come of it. – Italian Proverb

Never do that by proxy which you can do yourself. – Italian Proverb

Never heed the colour of a gift horse. – Italian Proverb

Never is a long time. – Italian Proverb

Never judge a book by its cover. – Italian Proverb

Never let people see the bottom of your purse or of your mind. – Italian Proverb

Never let the bottom of your purse or of your mind be seen. – Italian Proverb

Never let the sun go down on your anger. – Italian Proverb

Never point out the mistakes of another with a dirty finger. – Italian Proverb

Never refuse a good offer. – Italian Proverb

Never reveal the bottom of your purse or the depth of your mind. – Italian Proverb

Never rub your eye but with your elbow. – Italian Proverb

Never speak of a rope in the house of one who was hanged. – Italian Proverb

Never spur a willing horse. – Italian Proverb

Never want while your neighbor has it. – Italian Proverb

Never was a mewing cat a good mouser. – Italian Proverb

Nevertheless, it moves. – Italian Proverb

New brooms sweep clean. – Italian Proverb

New lords, new laws. – Italian Proverb

No comforter’s head ever aches. – Italian Proverb

No day but has its evening. – Italian Proverb

No day in which you learn something is a complete loss. – Italian Proverb

No flies get into a shut mouth. – Italian Proverb

No good doctor ever takes physic. – Italian Proverb

No good lawyer ever goes to court himself. – Italian Proverb

No good thing is failure and no evil thing success. – Italian Proverb

No grass grows on a beaten road. – Italian Proverb

No meat ever remains in the shambles however bad it may be. – Italian Proverb

No need to say “trot” to a good horse. – Italian Proverb

No news is good news. – Italian Proverb

No one ever became poor through giving alms. – Italian Proverb

No one ever kicks a dead dog. – Italian Proverb

No one ever repented of having held his tongue. – Italian Proverb

No one ever saw a goat dead of hunger. – Italian Proverb

No one is bound to do impossibilities. – Italian Proverb

No one likes justice brought home to his own door. – Italian Proverb

No one perceives where the shoe pinches but he who wears it. – Italian Proverb

No one should take in an eating pawn. – Italian Proverb

No pear falls into a shut mouth. – Italian Proverb

No rose without a thorn. – Italian Proverb

No sooner is a law made than a way around it is discovered. – Italian Proverb

No sooner is the law made than its evasion is discovered. – Italian Proverb

No woman ever speaks the naked truth. – Italian Proverb

No wonder lasts more than three days. – Italian Proverb

None so deaf as he that will not hear. – Italian Proverb

Not all are asleep who have their eyes shut. – Italian Proverb

Not all that shakes falls. – Italian Proverb

Not all words require an answer. – Italian Proverb

Not even hercules could contend against two. – Italian Proverb

Not every question deserves an answer. – Italian Proverb

Not every truth is good to be told. – Italian Proverb

Not every word requires an answer. – Italian Proverb

Not everything that is bad comes to hurt us. – Italian Proverb

Not everything, which is bad, comes to hurt us. – Italian Proverb

Not having enough is like not having anything. – Italian Proverb

Nothing can come out of a sack but what is in it. – Italian Proverb

Nothing dries faster than tears. – Italian Proverb

Nothing dries quicker than tears. – Italian Proverb

Nothing improves the taste of pasta more than a good appetite. – Italian Proverb

Nothing is difficult to a willing mind. – Italian Proverb

Nothing is ever well done in a hurry, except flying from the plague or from quarrels, and catching fleas. – Italian Proverb

Nothing is ill said if it is not ill taken. – Italian Proverb

Nothing passes between asses but kicks. – Italian Proverb

Nothing that is violent is permanent. – Italian Proverb

Nothing venture, nothing have. – Italian Proverb

Of future and contingent matters, we can have no definite knowledge. – Italian Proverb

Of judgment every one has a stock on hand for sale. – Italian Proverb

Of the great and of the dead either speak will or say nothing. – Italian Proverb

Of the wealth of the world each has as much as they take. – Italian Proverb

Of this world each man has as much as he takes. – Italian Proverb

Of three things the devil makes a salad: advocate’s tongues, notaries’ fingers, and a third that shall be nameless. – Italian Proverb

Of two cowards, the one who finds the other out first has the advantage. – Italian Proverb

Of two evils choose the less. – Italian Proverb

Of what does not concern you say nothing, good or bad. – Italian Proverb

Often he who does too much does too little. – Italian Proverb

Old birds are not caught with new nets. – Italian Proverb

Old friends are always new. – Italian Proverb

Old hens make good broth. – Italian Proverb

Old reckonings, new disputes. – Italian Proverb

Old saints don’t get incense anymore. – Italian Proverb

Old thanks are not for new gifts. – Italian Proverb

Old thanks cannot be used for new gifts. – Italian Proverb

Old wine and friends improve with age. – Italian Proverb

On a fool’s beard the barber learns to shave. – Italian Proverb

On a long journey even a straw is heavy. – Italian Proverb

On every small pretext the wolf seizes the sheep. – Italian Proverb

Once resolved, the trouble is over. – Italian Proverb

Once the game is over, the king and the pawn go back into the same box. – Italian Proverb

One basket of grapes does not make a vintage. – Italian Proverb

One bell serves a parish. – Italian Proverb

One bird in hand is better far Than two that in the bushes are. – Italian Proverb

One briar does not make a hedge. – Italian Proverb

One cannot drink and whistle at the same time. – Italian Proverb

One can’t enter Paradise in spite of the saints. – Italian Proverb

One daughter helps to marry the other. – Italian Proverb

One devil does not make hell. – Italian Proverb

One devil drives out another. – Italian Proverb

One devil knows another. – Italian Proverb

One door never shuts but another opens. – Italian Proverb

One enemy is too many, and a hundred friends are too few. – Italian Proverb

One enemy is too much for a man, and a hundred friends too few. – Italian Proverb

One enemy is too much, and a hundred friends are not enough. – Italian Proverb

One Englishman can beat three Frenchmen. – Italian Proverb

One eye of the master sees more than four eyes of his servants. – Italian Proverb

One flea does not hinder sleep. – Italian Proverb

One flower does not make a garland. – Italian Proverb

One fool is enough in a house. – Italian Proverb

One good morsel and a hundred vexations. – Italian Proverb

One good word quenches more heat than a bucket of water. – Italian Proverb

One hand washes the other, and both the face. – Italian Proverb

One is never too old to yearn. – Italian Proverb

One knife keeps another in its sheath. – Italian Proverb

One knife whets another. – Italian Proverb

One lie draw ten after it. – Italian Proverb

One lie makes many. – Italian Proverb

One living pope is better than ten dead. – Italian Proverb

One may buy gold too dear. – Italian Proverb

One may have good eyes and see nothing. – Italian Proverb

One may have good eyes and yet see nothing. – Italian Proverb

One minute of patience can result in ten years of peace. – Italian Proverb

One nail drives out another. – Italian Proverb

One never wept but another laughed. – Italian Proverb

One pair of ears would exhaust a hundred tongues. – Italian Proverb

One scabby sheep spoils a flock. – Italian Proverb

One should learn to sail in all winds. – Italian Proverb

One starts the hare, another catches it. – Italian Proverb

One swallow does not make a summer. – Italian Proverb

One who speaks fair words feeds you with an empty spoon. – Italian Proverb

One who walks in another’s tracks leaves no footprints. – Italian Proverb

One who wants to keep their yard tidy does not reserve a plot for the weeds. – Italian Proverb

One with the courage to laugh is master of the world almost as much as the one who is ready to die. – Italian Proverb

One word brings on another. – Italian Proverb

One would not be alone even in Paradise. – Italian Proverb

One would not be alone in Paradise. – Italian Proverb

One’s own spurs and another’s horse make the miles short. – Italian Proverb

Only a fool asks, “What do you want with my wife?” – Italian Proverb

Open thy mouth that I may know thee. – Italian Proverb

“Yes” and “no” govern the world. 

Opportunity makes the thief. – Italian Proverb

Opportunity never knocks twice at any man’s door. – Italian Proverb

Opportunity only knocks once. – Italian Proverb

Others’ bread has seven crusts. – Italian Proverb

Others’ bread is too salt. – Italian Proverb

Our last garment is made without pockets. – Italian Proverb

Out of a great evil often comes a great good. – Italian Proverb

Out of a white egg often comes a black chick. – Italian Proverb

Out of debt, out of danger. – Italian Proverb

Paper does not blush. – Italian Proverb

Patience is a flower that grows not in everyone’s garden. – Italian Proverb

Patience is a plant that does not grow in everyone’s garden. – Italian Proverb

Patience! said the wolf to the ass. – Italian Proverb

Pay beforehand was never well served. – Italian Proverb

Peel a fig for your friend, a peach for your enemy. – Italian Proverb

Penny and penny laid up will be many. – Italian Proverb

People get the government they deserve. – Italian Proverb

Plenty makes daintiness. – Italian Proverb

Plenty of words when the cause is lost. – Italian Proverb

Pluck the magpie, and don’t make her scream. – Italian Proverb

Pluck the rose and leave the thorns. – Italian Proverb

Poison quells poison. – Italian Proverb

Poor men do penance for rich men’s sins. – Italian Proverb

Poor men’s money and cowards’ weapons are often flourished. – Italian Proverb

Poverty has no kin. – Italian Proverb

Poverty wants many things, and avarice all. – Italian Proverb

Praise the sea, and keep on land. – Italian Proverb

Preventing someone from falling is better than helping him get up. – Italian Proverb

Pride breakfasted with plenty, dined with poverty, and supped with infamy. – Italian Proverb

Pride went out on horseback, and returned on foot. – Italian Proverb

Priests, friars, nuns, and chickens never have enough. – Italian Proverb

Princes have long arms. – Italian Proverb

Proverbs bear age, and he who would do well may view himself in them as in a looking glass. – Italian Proverb

Public money is like holy water, every one helps himself to it. – Italian Proverb

Put the cart before the horse. – Italian Proverb

Quick and well don’t agree. – Italian Proverb

Rather an ass that carries than a horse that throws. – Italian Proverb

Rather hat in hand than hand in purse. – Italian Proverb

Rather have a little one for your friend, than a great one for your enemy. – Italian Proverb

Ravens do not peck out raven’s eyes. – Italian Proverb

Reason lies between the bridle and the spur. – Italian Proverb

Reconciled friendship is a wound ill salved. – Italian Proverb

Revenge a hundred years old has still its milk-teeth. – Italian Proverb

Rome was not built in a day. – Italian Proverb

Running water carries no poison. – Italian Proverb

Save a thief from the gallows and he’ll be the first who shall cut your throat. – Italian Proverb

Save something for the man that rides on the white horse. – Italian Proverb

Save us from our friends. – Italian Proverb

Savings are the first gain. – Italian Proverb

Say what we will, do what we will, the boat goes but sorrily without oars. – Italian Proverb

Saying and doing are two things. – Italian Proverb

Saying is one thing, doing another. – Italian Proverb

Second thoughts are best. – Italian Proverb

Secrecy is the beginning of tyranny. – Italian Proverb

See Naples, and then die! For the smell you find there. – Italian Proverb

See Naples, and then die. – Italian Proverb

See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. – Italian Proverb

Seeing is believing. – Italian Proverb

Seldom seen soon forgotten. – Italian Proverb

Self exaltation is the fool’s paradise. – Italian Proverb

Sell me dear, and measure me fair. – Italian Proverb

Sell not the bear’s skin before you have caught him. – Italian Proverb

Service is not inheritance. – Italian Proverb

She who is born a beauty is born betrothed. – Italian Proverb

Short is the road that leads from fear to hatred. – Italian Proverb

Sickness tells us what we are. – Italian Proverb

Silence was never written down. – Italian Proverb

Since the house is on fire I will warm myself at the blaze. – Italian Proverb

Since the house is on fire, let us warm ourselves. – Italian Proverb

Six feet of earth make us all equal. – Italian Proverb

Six feet of earth will make us all equal. – Italian Proverb

Six hours sleep for a man, seven for a woman, and eight for a fool. – Italian Proverb

Six of one, and half a dozen of the other. – Italian Proverb

Skill or fortune will efface the spots. – Italian Proverb

Small rain lays a great wind. – Italian Proverb

Small rain lays great dust. – Italian Proverb

Smooth words do not flay the tongue. – Italian Proverb

Smooth words make smooth ways. – Italian Proverb

Snapping curs never want sore ears. – Italian Proverb

So good that he is good for nothing. – Italian Proverb

So kind and so honest my lady appears to be. – Italian Proverb

So many countries, so many customs. – Italian Proverb

Softly, barber, the water scalds. – Italian Proverb

Softly, don’t raise a dust. – Italian Proverb

Softly, softly, catchee monkey. – Italian Proverb

Some many heads, so many brains. – Italian Proverb

Some sing who are not merry. – Italian Proverb

Some who just tell tales of themselves. – Italian Proverb

Sometimes an egg is given for an ox. – Italian Proverb

Sometimes it’s better to give your apple away than to eat it yourself. – Italian Proverb

Sometimes the lees are better than the wine. – Italian Proverb

Soon crooks the tree That good gambrel would be. – Italian Proverb

Speak not ill of the year until it is past. – Italian Proverb

Speak not of my debts unless you mean to pay them. – Italian Proverb

Speak of the devil and he appears. – Italian Proverb

Speak well of your friend; of your enemy neither well nor ill. – Italian Proverb

Speak when you are spoken to. – Italian Proverb

Spur not a willing horse. – Italian Proverb

St. Francis shaved himself first, and then he shaved his brethren. – Italian Proverb

Starlings are lean because they go in flocks. – Italian Proverb

Step by step one goes to Rome. – Italian Proverb

Still water breeds vermin. – Italian Proverb

Stones or bread, one must have something in hand for the dogs. – Italian ProverbItalian Proverb

Strength avails not a coward. – Italian Proverb

Stretch your arm no further than your sleeve will reach. – Italian Proverb

Strike while the iron is hot. – Italian Proverb

Strong is the vinegar of sweet wine. – Italian Proverb

Substance is not enough, accident is also required. – Italian Proverb

Summer is the mother of the poor. – Italian Proverb

Sweet meat requires sour sauce. – Italian Proverb

Take care you don’t let your tail be caught in the door. – Italian Proverb

Take down a thief from the gallows and he will hang you up. – Italian Proverb

Teeth placed before the tongue give good advice. – Italian Proverb

Teeth placed in front of the tongue give good advice. – Italian Proverb

Tell everybody your business and the devil will do it for you. – Italian Proverb

Tell me the company you keep, and I will tell you who you are. – Italian Proverb

Tell me with whom you go and i’ll tell you what you are. – Italian Proverb

Tell your secret to your friend and he will set his foot on your neck. – Italian Proverb

Temperance is the best medicine. – Italian Proverb

Tempest in a teapot. – Italian Proverb

Tenderness can be a bad judge. – Italian Proverb

Thank you, pretty pussy, was the death of my cat. – Italian Proverb

That costs dear which is bought with begging. – Italian Proverb

That crown is well spent which saves you ten. – Italian Proverb

That happens in a moment which may not happen in a hundred years. – Italian Proverb

That is done soon enough which is well done. – Italian Proverb

That is pleasant to remember which was hard to endure. – Italian Proverb

That priest is a fool who decries his relics. – Italian Proverb

That suit is best that best fits me. – Italian Proverb

That that comes of a cat will catch mice. – Italian Proverb

That which is customary requires no excuse. – Italian Proverb

That which the wise man does first, the fool does last. – Italian Proverb

The anvil lasts longer than the hammer. – Italian Proverb

The applause of the people is a blast of air. – Italian Proverb

The apple does not fall far from the tree. – Italian Proverb

The ass does not know the worth of this tail till he has lost it. – Italian Proverb

The ass’s hide is used to the stick. – Italian Proverb

The back door is the one that robs the home. – Italian Proverb

The back door robbeth the house. – Italian Proverb

The beard does not make the philosopher. – Italian Proverb

The beast once dead, the venom is dead. – Italian Proverb

The beggar’s wallet has no bottom. – Italian Proverb

The bell does not go to mass, and yet calls every one to it. – Italian Proverb

The best advice one can give to the hungry is bread. – Italian Proverb

The best always goes first. – Italian Proverb

The best armor is to keep out of range. – Italian Proverb

The best defence is to attack. – Italian Proverb

The best is the cheapest. – Italian Proverb

The best is the enemy of the good. – Italian Proverb

The best pears fall into the pigs’ mouths. – Italian Proverb

The best physicians are Dr. Diet, Dr. Quiet, and Dr. Merryman. – Italian Proverb

The best spices are in small bags. – Italian Proverb

The best swimmer is the first to drown himself. – Italian Proverb

The best trees are the most beaten. – Italian Proverb

The best way to get praise is to die. – Italian Proverb

The big fish eat the little. – Italian Proverb

The biter is sometimes bit. – Italian Proverb

The braying of an ass does not reach heaven. – Italian Proverb

The bucket goes so often to the well that it leaves its handle there. – Italian Proverb

The buckets take to fighting with the well, and get their heads broken. – Italian Proverb

The buyer has need of a hundred eyes, the seller of but one. – Italian Proverb

The buyer needs a hundred eyes; the seller but one. – Italian Proverb

The cask can give no other wine that that it contains. – Italian Proverb

The cat loves fish, but is loth to wet her feet. – Italian Proverb

The chamber-bell is the worst sound one have in his ears. – Italian Proverb

The cheat always lies at the feet of the cheated. – Italian Proverb

The cock is bold on his own dunghill. – Italian Proverb

The comforter’s head never aches. – Italian Proverb

The common soldier’s blood makes the general great. – Italian Proverb

The company makes the feast. – Italian Proverb

The countries you visit, the customs you find. – Italian Proverb

The court of Rome likes not sheep without wool. – Italian Proverb

The cowl does not make the monk. – Italian Proverb

The danger past, the saint cheated. – Italian Proverb

The darkest hour is just before dawn. – Italian Proverb

The devil is bad because he is old. – Italian Proverb

The devil turns away from a closed door. – Italian Proverb

The devil will tempt Lucifer. – Italian Proverb

The difficult thing is to get foot in the stirrup. – Italian Proverb

The doctor seldom takes physic. – Italian Proverb

The dog barks and the ox feeds. – Italian Proverb

The dog that bites does not bark in vain. – Italian Proverb

The dog that has been beaten with a stick is afraid of its shadow. – Italian Proverb

The dog that is quarrelsome and not strong, woe to his hide. – Italian Proverb

The dog that licks ashes is not to be trusted with flour. – Italian Proverb

The dog that means to bite don’t bark. – Italian Proverb

The dog that quits barking can get some sleep. – Italian Proverb

The dog wags his tail, not for you, but for your bread. – Italian Proverb

The donkey won’t drink if he can’t see water. – Italian Proverb

The dying cannot leave their wisdom or experience to their heirs. – Italian Proverb

The eagle does not wage war against frogs. – Italian Proverb

The eagle does not war against frogs. – Italian Proverb

The earth covers the errors of the physician. – Italian Proverb

The election of the abbot is not stopped for want of a monk. – Italian Proverb

The elephant does not feel a flea-bite. – Italian Proverb

The end of passion is the beginning of repentance. – Italian Proverb

The end of the corsair is to drown. – Italian Proverb

The end of the pig is the beginning of the sausage. – Italian Proverb

The end praises the work. – Italian Proverb

The eye is blind if the mind is absent. – Italian Proverb

The eye of the master fattens the horse. – Italian Proverb

The father a saint the son a devil. – Italian Proverb

The fear of war is worse than war itself. – Italian Proverb

The feast passes and the fool remains. – Italian Proverb

The first at the mill grinds first. – Italian Proverb

The first blow is as good as two. – Italian Proverb

The first dish pleases every one. – Italian Proverb

The fish rots from the head. – Italian Proverb

The flatterer’s throat is an open sepulchre. – Italian Proverb

The fly that bites the tortoise breaks its beak. – Italian Proverb

The fool has to do at last what the wise did at first. – Italian Proverb

The fool knows more in his own house than the sage in other men’s. – Italian Proverb

The fortress that parleys soon surrenders. – Italian Proverb

The fox advised the others to cut off their tails, because he had left his own in the trap. – Italian Proverb

The fox said the grapes were sour. – Italian Proverb

The friendship of the great is fraternity with lions. – Italian Proverb

The frog cannot out of her bog. – Italian Proverb

The fugitive finds everything impede him. – Italian Proverb

The full belly does not believe in hunger. – Italian Proverb

The full cask makes no noise. – Italian Proverb

The gallows was made for the unlucky. – Italian Proverb

The gallows will have its own at last. – Italian Proverb

The gardener’s dog does not eat lettuce and will not let others eat it. – Italian Proverb

The golden key opens every door. – Italian Proverb

The good seaman is known in bad weather. – Italian Proverb

The good shepherd shears, not flays. – Italian Proverb

The good time comes but once. – Italian Proverb

The gown does not make the friar. – Italian Proverb

The hardest step is that over the threshold. – Italian Proverb

The hare starts from where it is least expected. – Italian Proverb

The healthy die first. – Italian Proverb

The heart does not think all the mouth says. – Italian Proverb

The heart has reasons that reason does not understand. – Italian Proverb

The higher the rise the greater the fall. – Italian Proverb

The highest branch is not the safest roost. – Italian Proverb

The house completed, possession defeated. – Italian Proverb

The injurer never forgets. – Italian Proverb

The Italianised Englishman is a devil incarnate. – Italian Proverb

The Italians are wise before the act, the Germans in the act, the French after the act. – Italian Proverb

The joker confesses. – Italian Proverb

The just man may sin with an open chest of gold before him. – Italian Proverb

The kick of a mare never hurt a colt. – Italian Proverb

The last comer shuts the door. – Italian Proverb

The later comer is ill lodged. – Italian Proverb

The lazy pig does not eat ripe pears. – Italian Proverb

The liar is not believed when he speaks the truth. – Italian Proverb

The light is painful to sore eyes. – Italian Proverb

The lion and the lamb shall lie down together, but the lamb won’t get much sleep. – Italian Proverb

The lion had need of the mouse. – Italian Proverb

The lion is known by his claws. – Italian Proverb

The lives of doctors, the souls of priests, and the property of lawyers, are in great danger. – Italian Proverb

The lone sheep is in danger of the wolf. – Italian Proverb

The longest way round is the shortest way home. – Italian Proverb

The loquacity of fools is a lecture to the wise. – Italian Proverb

The man who knows two languages is worth two men. – Italian Proverb

The man who lives only by hope will die with despair. – Italian Proverb

The man who loves is easy of belief. – Italian Proverb

The man who never makes a mistake always takes orders from one who does. – Italian Proverb

The mill does not grind without water. – Italian Proverb

The mills of god grind slowly, yet they grind exceedingly small. – Italian Proverb

The moon does not heed the baying of dogs. – Italian Proverb

The more physical the love, the more sublime. – Italian Proverb

The more the fox is cursed, the more prey he catches. – Italian Proverb

The more the merrier. – Italian Proverb

The more you stroke the cat’s back the more set sets up her tail. – Italian Proverb

The mortar always smells of garlic. – Italian Proverb

The most prudent yields to the strongest. – Italian Proverb

The moth does most mischief to the finest garment. – Italian Proverb

The mother of idiots is always pregnant. – Italian Proverb

The mountains are in labour, and bring forth a mouse. – Italian Proverb

The mouse does not leave the cat’s house with a bellyful. – Italian Proverb

The myrtle is always a myrtle, though it be among nettles. – Italian Proverb

The ox saying ‘horned’ to the donkey. – Italian Proverb

The pan says to the pot: Keep off, or you’ll smutch me. – Italian Proverb

The people’s voice, God’s voice. – Italian Proverb

The person who doubts nothing, knows nothing. – Italian Proverb

The person who enjoys good health is rich, even if he doesn’t know it. – Italian Proverb

The person who has no opinion will seldom be wrong. – Italian Proverb

The person who lives by hope will die by despair. – Italian Proverb

The person who lives with cripples will soon learn to limp. – Italian Proverb

The person who offends writes as if it was written on sand, and the person who is offended reads it as if it were written on marble. – Italian Proverb

The pitcher that goes often to the fountain leaves there either its handle or its spout. – Italian Proverb

The point of the thorn is small, but he who has felt it does not forget it. – Italian Proverb

The poison of asps is under their lips. – Italian Proverb

The poor is hated by his neighbour, but the rich hath many friends. – Italian Proverb

The poorhouse is filled with honest people. – Italian Proverb

The poorhouse is full of honest people. – Italian Proverb

The pope and a peasant know more between them than the pope alone. – Italian Proverb

The priest errs at the altar. – Italian Proverb

The priest’s friend loses his faith, the doctor’s his health, and the lawyer’s his fortune. – Italian Proverb

The purse of loved ones is tied with a gossamer thread. – Italian Proverb

The remedy for injuries is not to remember them. – Italian Proverb

The remedy is often worse than the disease. – Italian Proverb

The rich never have to seek out their relatives. – Italian Proverb

The right hand is slave to the left. – Italian Proverb

The right man comes at the right time. – Italian Proverb

The river does not swell with clear water. – Italian Proverb

The river passed the saint forgotten. – Italian Proverb

The roses fall, and the thorns remain. – Italian Proverb

The roses fall, the thorns remain. – Italian Proverb

The rotten apple injures its neighbour. – Italian Proverb

The saint has no believers unless he works miracles. – Italian Proverb

The salt of patience seasons everything. – Italian Proverb

The same fire purifies gold and consumes straw. – Italian Proverb

The same fire which purifies gold consumes straw. – Italian Proverb

The same hammer that breaks the glass forges the steel. – Italian Proverb

The same shoe does not fit every foot. – Italian Proverb

The scalded dog fears cold water. – Italian Proverb

The scalded dog fears hot water, and afterwards, cold. – Italian Proverb

The scent of every flower is short lived. – Italian Proverb

The second thought is always the best. – Italian Proverb

The shadow of a lord is a cap for a fool. – Italian Proverb

The she-bear thinks her cubs pretty. – Italian Proverb

The sheep that bleats loses a mouthful. – Italian Proverb

The ship does not go without the boat. – Italian Proverb

The shirt is nearer than the doublet. – Italian Proverb

The sick man is free to say all. – Italian Proverb

The sick man sleeps when the debtor cannot. – Italian Proverb

The smaller the heart, the longer the tongue. – Italian Proverb

The smoke of my own house is better than another man’s fire. – Italian Proverb

The soldier is well paid for doing mischief. – Italian Proverb

The soldier’s blood exalts the captain. – Italian Proverb

The sound of the bell does not drive away rooks. – Italian Proverb

The stitch is lost unless the thread be knotted. – Italian Proverb

The strongest is always in the right. – Italian Proverb

The sun is still beautiful, though ready to set. – Italian Proverb

The sun loses nothing by shining into a puddle. – Italian Proverb

The sun passes over filth and is not defiled. – Italian Proverb

The sun passes over filth and is not dirtied. – Italian Proverb

The tail is always the hardest part to flay. – Italian Proverb

The talkers sows, the listener reaps. – Italian Proverb

The tender surgeon makes the wound gangrene. – Italian Proverb

The thief is frightened even by a mouse. – Italian Proverb

The thief’s wife does not always laugh. – Italian Proverb

The tongue goes to where the tooth aches. – Italian Proverb

The tree does not fall at the first stroke. – Italian Proverb

The tree is known by its fruit. – Italian Proverb

The tree is not felled at one blow. – Italian Proverb

The tree is not to be judged of by its bark. – Italian Proverb

The Trojans were wise too late. – Italian Proverb

The unfortunate know who are their real friends. – Italian Proverb

The venom is in the tail. – Italian Proverb

The virtue of parents is in itself a great legacy. – Italian Proverb

The virtue of silence is a great piece of knowledge. – Italian Proverb

The water breaks out where it is not expected. – Italian Proverb

The well-fed man does not believe in hunger. – Italian Proverb

The white coat does not make the miller. – Italian Proverb

The whole hog or none. – Italian Proverb

The whole ocean is made up of single drops. – Italian Proverb

The wicked even hate vice in others. – Italian Proverb

The wolf bemoans the sheep, and then eats it. – Italian Proverb

The wolf is always left out of the reckoning. – Italian Proverb

The wolf is always said to be more terrible than he is. – Italian Proverb

The wolf is not always a wolf. – Italian Proverb

The woman who gives is seldom good; the woman who accepts is in the power of the giver. – Italian Proverb

The workman is known by his work. – Italian Proverb

The world belongs to the phlegmatic. – Italian Proverb

The world is for him who has patience. – Italian Proverb

The world is governed with little brains. – Italian Proverb

The world is like a staircase; some go up, others go down. – Italian Proverb

The world wags on with three things: doing, undoing, and pretending. – Italian Proverb

The worst pig gets the best pear. – Italian Proverb

The worst pig often gets the best pear. – Italian Proverb

The worst wheel creaks most. – Italian Proverb

The wrong-doer never lacks excuses. – Italian Proverb

There are good and bad everywhere. – Italian Proverb

There are many roads to Rome. – Italian Proverb

There are more asses than carry sacks. – Italian Proverb

There are more thieves than gibbets. – Italian Proverb

There are more threatened than slain. – Italian Proverb

There are more ways to the wood than one. – Italian Proverb

There are no birds in last year’s nest. – Italian Proverb

There are some who despise pride with a greater pride. – Italian Proverb

There are some who despise pride with greater pride. – Italian Proverb

There are some who see ill, and would like to see worse. – Italian Proverb

There are tricks in all trades. – Italian Proverb

There are tricks in every trade. – Italian Proverb

There goes more than one ass to market. – Italian Proverb

There goes more to marriage than four bare legs in a bed. – Italian Proverb

There is a cause for all things. – Italian Proverb

There is a deep sea between saying and doing. – Italian Proverb

There is little peace in that house where the hen crows and the cock is mute. – Italian Proverb

There is never a cry of “Wolf!” but the wolf is in the district. – Italian Proverb

There is never enmity between the cook and the butler. – Italian Proverb

There is never enough where nought is left. – Italian Proverb

There is no appeal from time past. – Italian Proverb

There is no beard so well shaven but another barber will find something more to shave from it. – Italian Proverb

There is no dog, be he ever so wicked, but wags his tail. – Italian Proverb

There is no fool like a learned fool. – Italian Proverb

There is no getting blood from a turnip. – Italian Proverb

There is no helping him who will not be advised. – Italian Proverb

There is no love like the first love. – Italian Proverb

There is no love without jealousy. – Italian Proverb

There is no making pancakes without breaking the eggs. – Italian Proverb

There is no need to bind up one’s head before it is broken. – Italian Proverb

There is no robber worse than a bad book. – Italian Proverb

There is no thief like a bad book. – Italian Proverb

There is no use in saying, I will not go such a way, nor drink of such a water. – Italian Proverb

There is no worse fruit than that which never ripens. – Italian Proverb

There is no worse joke than a true one. – Italian Proverb

There is no worse robber than a bad book. – Italian Proverb

There is no worse thief than a bad book. – Italian Proverb

There never was a shoe however handsome that did not become an ugly slipper. – Italian Proverb

There’s no disputing about tastes. – Italian Proverb

There’s no fool like a learned fool. – Italian Proverb

There’s no getting to heaven in a coach. – Italian Proverb

There’s no going to heaven in a sedan. – Italian Proverb

There’s no great loss without some gain. – Italian Proverb

There’s no making the ass drink when his is not thirsty. – Italian Proverb

There’s no smoke with fire. – Italian Proverb

There’s no thief like a bad book. – Italian Proverb

There’s no turning a windmill with a pair of bellows. – Italian Proverb

There’s none so blind as those who will not see. – Italian Proverb

They say, is a liar. – Italian Proverb

They who shun the smoke often fall into the fire. – Italian Proverb

They who sing through the summer must dance in the winter. – Italian Proverb

Thick wine is better than clear water. – Italian Proverb

Things are not as they are, but as they are regarded. – Italian Proverb

Think much, speak little and write less. – Italian Proverb

Thirst comes from drinking. – Italian Proverb

‘Tis better to ride a donkey that carries you than a horse that throws you. – Italian Proverb

Those who begin many things finish but a few. – Italian Proverb

Those who don’t understand prayer – – let them go to sea. – Italian Proverb

Those who sleep with dogs will rise with fleas. – Italian Proverb

Those who too soon retire, soon get old. – Italian Proverb

Though a lie be swift, truth overtakes it. – Italian Proverb

Though the fox runs, the pullets have wings. – Italian Proverb

Threats are arms for the threatened. – Italian Proverb

Three are powerful: the Pope, the king, and the man who has nothing. – Italian Proverb

Three brothers, three castles. – Italian Proverb

Three know it, all know it. – Italian Proverb

Three may keep a secret, if two of them are dead. – Italian Proverb

Three things drive a man out of doors: smoke, dropping water, and a shrew. – Italian Proverb

Three women and a goose make a market. – Italian Proverb

Through being too knowing the fox lost his tail. – Italian Proverb

Tie me hand and foot and throw me among my own people. – Italian Proverb

Tied to the sowre apple-tree. – Italian Proverb

Time and patience change the mulberry leaf to satin. – Italian Proverb

Time is an inaudible file. – Italian Proverb

‘Tis a silly sheep that confesses to the wolf. – Italian Proverb

‘Tis good feasting in other men’s houses. – Italian Proverb

To a crazy ship every wind is contrary. – Italian Proverb

To a quick question give a slow answer. – Italian Proverb

To a quick question, give a slow answer. – Italian Proverb

To a weaving that has begun, God sends threads. – Italian Proverb

To a young heart everything is sport. – Italian Proverb

To be lucky you need a little wit. – Italian Proverb

To become rich in this world, it needs only to turn one’s back on God. – Italian Proverb

To censure princes is perilous, and to praise them is lying. – Italian Proverb

To err is human, to persist in it, beastly. – Italian Proverb

To every saint his torch. – Italian Proverb

To expect what never comes, to lie in bed and not sleep, to serve well and not be advanced, are three things to die of. – Italian Proverb

To fall out of the frying-pan into the fire. – Italian Proverb

To go safely through the world you must have the eye of a falcon, the ear of an ass, the face of an ape, the mouth of a pig, the shoulders of a camel, and the legs of a deer. 

To have “Heard say” is half a lie. – Italian Proverb

To have eye one on the cat and another on the frying-pan. – Italian Proverb

To have luck needs little wit. – Italian Proverb

To him that watches, everything is revealed. – Italian Proverb

To him who can take what thou hast, give what he asks. – Italian Proverb

To him who gives you a pig you may well give a rasher. – Italian Proverb

To him who is determined it remains only to act. – Italian Proverb

To him who watches, everything reveals itself. – Italian Proverb

To know everything is to know nothing. – Italian Proverb

To make the cart go you must grease the wheels. – Italian Proverb

To preserve friendship, one must build walls. – Italian Proverb

To promise and give nothing is comfort for a fool. – Italian Proverb

To protest and knock one’s head against the wall is what everybody can do. – Italian Proverb

To the fallen tree, hatchets. hatchets. – Italian Proverb

To the person who watches, everything reveals itself. – Italian Proverb

To the person with little shame, the whole world is his. – Italian Proverb

To trust is good; not to trust is better. – Italian Proverb

To whom you tell your secret you surrender your freedom. – Italian Proverb

Too much prosperity makes most men fools. – Italian Proverb

Translator, traitor. – Italian Proverb

Translators, traitors. – Italian Proverb

Travel broadens the mind. – Italian Proverb

Trouble rides a fast horse. – Italian Proverb

Trouble shared is trouble halved. – Italian Proverb

True love never grows old. – Italian Proverb

Trust not the praise of a friend nor the contempt of an enemy. – Italian Proverb

Trust was a good man; Trust-not was a better. – Italian Proverb

Two cocks in one yard do not agree. – Italian Proverb

Two dogs fight for a bone and a third runs away with it. – Italian Proverb

Two women and a goose make a market. – Italian Proverb

Unbending the bow does not cure the wound. – Italian Proverb

Unbending the bow does not heal the wound. – Italian Proverb

Under white ashes there is glowing coal. – Italian Proverb

Until death there is no knowing what may befall. – Italian Proverb

Vainglory blossoms but never bears. – Italian Proverb

Various are the roads to fame. – Italian Proverb

Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord. – Italian Proverb

Vetches seem bitter to the full-cropped pigeon. – Italian Proverb

Vexations, duly borne, Are but as trials, which heaven’s love to man Sends for his good. – Italian Proverb

Vices are learned without a master. – Italian Proverb

Virginity is noted only in its absence. – Italian Proverb

Virtue comes not from chance but long study. – Italian Proverb

Voice of one, voice of none. – Italian Proverb

Wait time and place to take your revenge, for it is never well done in a hurry. – Italian Proverb

Wake not a sleeping dog. – Italian Proverb

War begun, hell unchained. – Italian Proverb

War makes robbers, and peace hangs them. – Italian Proverb

Water after does not quench a fire at hand. – Italian Proverb

Water past will not turn the mill. – Italian Proverb

Water, smoke, and a vicious woman, drive men out of the house. – Italian Proverb

We are all Adam’s children. – Italian Proverb

We learn by teaching. – Italian Proverb

We learn from our mistakes. – Italian Proverb

We love the treason but hate the traitor. – Italian Proverb

Wealth conquered Rome after Rome had conquered the world. – Italian Proverb

Wealth is not his who makes it, but his who enjoys it. – Italian Proverb

Weather, husbands, and sons come as you take them. – Italian Proverb

Well begun is half done. – Italian Proverb

What a fool does in the end, the wise man does in the beginning. – Italian Proverb

What costs little is little esteemed. – Italian Proverb

What does not poison, fattens. – Italian Proverb

What has not been, may be. – Italian Proverb

What is bought is cheaper than a gift. – Italian Proverb

What is done cannot be undone. – Italian Proverb

What keeps out the cold keeps out the heat. – Italian Proverb

What shall I say when it is better to say nothing? – Italian Proverb

What the eye sees not the heart rues not. – Italian Proverb

What will be, will be. – Italian Proverb

What worth has beauty if it is not seen? – Italian Proverb

What you can’t have, abuse. – Italian Proverb

When a dog runs away, hit him. hit him. – Italian Proverb

When a friend asks, there is no tomorrow. – Italian Proverb

When a man has fallen into the mire, the more he flounders the more he fouls himself. – Italian Proverb

When a man is falling, every saint pushes him. – Italian Proverb

When a tree is falling, every one cries, down with it. – Italian Proverb

When a wife sins the husband is never innocent. – Italian Proverb

When everybody says you are drunk, go to sleep. – Italian Proverb

When fortune comes, open your doors. – Italian Proverb

When God punishes a land, he deprives it’s leaders of wisdom. – Italian Proverb

When God will not, the saints cannot. – Italian Proverb

When gold speaks every tongue is silent. – Italian Proverb

When good cheer is lacking, our friends will be packing. – Italian Proverb

When his head is broken he puts on his helmet. – Italian Proverb

When house and land are gone and spent, then learning is most excellent. – Italian Proverb

When ill luck falls asleep, let none wake her. – Italian Proverb

When ill-luck falls asleep let nobody wake her. – Italian Proverb

When I’m dead, everybody’s dead – – and the pig too. – Italian Proverb

When it thunders, the thief becomes honest. – Italian Proverb

When rogues go in procession the devil carries the cross. – Italian Proverb

When the cat’s away the mice dance. – Italian Proverb

When the cat’s away the rats dance. – Italian Proverb

When the danger has passed, the saints are soon forgotten. – Italian Proverb

When the danger is past God is cheated. – Italian Proverb

When the devil is old he turns hermit. – Italian Proverb

When the fox preaches, take care of yourselves, hens. – Italian Proverb

When the lion is dead the hares jump upon his carcass. – Italian Proverb

When the lion’s skin falls short, piece it out with that of the fox. – Italian Proverb

When the millers are making an uproar, do you tie up your sacks. – Italian Proverb

When the pear is ripe, it falls. – Italian Proverb

When the ship has sunk everyone knows how she might have been saved. – Italian Proverb

When the sun is highest it casts the least shadow. – Italian Proverb

When the sun shines on thee, thou needest not care for the moon. – Italian Proverb

When the tree is down every one runs to it with a hatchet to cut wood. – Italian Proverb

When the will is prompt the legs are nimble. – Italian Proverb

When the wind is in the east, ’tis neither good for man nor beast. – Italian Proverb

When the wind serves, all aid. – Italian Proverb

When the wine is in, the wit is out. – Italian Proverb

When the wine’s in the wit’s out. – Italian Proverb

When there is a fire in the neighbourhood carry water to your own house. – Italian Proverb

When there is little bread at table put plenty on your plate. – Italian Proverb

When there is nothing the church loses. – Italian Proverb

When wine comes in, modesty leaves. – Italian Proverb

When wine enters modesty departs. – Italian Proverb

When wine sinks, words swim. – Italian Proverb

When wise men play mad pranks they do it with a vengeance. – Italian Proverb

When woman reigns the devil governs. – Italian Proverb

When you see the wolf, do not look for his track. – Italian Proverb

When your devil was born, mine was going to school. – Italian Proverb

When your neighbor’s house is on fire, carry water to your own. – Italian Proverb

Where gold speaks every tongue is silent. – Italian Proverb

Where love is there the eye is. – Italian Proverb

Where passion is high, reason is low. – Italian Proverb

Where remedies are needed, sighing avails not. – Italian Proverb

Where shall a man have a worse friend than he brings from home. – Italian Proverb

Where the devil cannot put his head he puts his tail. – Italian Proverb

Where the hedge is low every one will cross it. – Italian Proverb

Where the Pope is there is Rome. – Italian Proverb

Where the pupil is willing; the teachers will appear. – Italian Proverb

Where the river is deepest it makes the least noise. – Italian Proverb

Where the ship goes the brig can go. – Italian Proverb

Where the skin of the lion does not suffice, we must join that of the fox. – Italian Proverb

Where the wolf gets one lamb he looks for another. – Italian Proverb

Where there are no dogs the fox is a king. – Italian Proverb

Where there are no hounds the fox is king. – Italian Proverb

Where there are too many cooks the soup will be too salty. – Italian Proverb

Where there is equality there never can be perfect love. – Italian Proverb

Where there is great love there is great pain. – Italian Proverb

Where there is least heart there is most tongue. – Italian Proverb

Where there is nothing to gain, there is a lot to lose. – Italian Proverb

Where there’s a will there’s a way. – Italian Proverb

Where there’s life, there’s hope. – Italian Proverb

While the grass grows, the steed starves. – Italian Proverb

While there’s life there’s hope. – Italian Proverb

While two dogs are fighting for a bone, a third runs away with it. – Italian Proverb

Who accepts, sells himself. – Italian Proverb

Who acts not, fails not. – Italian Proverb

Who builds on the mob builds on sand. – Italian Proverb

Who builds upon the people, builds upon sand. – Italian Proverb

Who buys hath need of eyes. – Italian Proverb

Who buys land buys war. – Italian Proverb

Who can do, don’t want to; Who wants to, can’t do; Who knows how to do, won’t do it; Who does it, doesn’t know how to; and, so, badly goes the world. – Italian Proverb

Who cannot beat the horse let him beat the saddle. – Italian Proverb

Who changes country changes luck. – Italian Proverb

Who changes his condition changes fortune. – Italian Proverb

Who comes seldom, is welcome. – Italian Proverb

Who dangles after the great is the last at table and the first to be cuffed. – Italian Proverb

Who depends on another man’s table often dines late. – Italian Proverb

Who divides honey with the bear, will be like to get the lesser share.. – Italian Proverb

Who does all he may never does well. – Italian Proverb

Who does not wish to be like the wolf let him not wear its skin. – Italian Proverb

Who does too much, often does little. – Italian Proverb

Who errs in the tens errs in the thousands. – Italian Proverb

Who excuses himself accuses himself. – Italian Proverb

Who excuses himself without being accused makes his fault manifest. – Italian Proverb

Who frequents the kitchen smells of smoke. – Italian Proverb

Who gives bread to other’s dogs is often barked at by her own. – Italian Proverb

Who gives sell, sells dear, if the receiver be not a churl. – Italian Proverb

Who gives, teaches a return. – Italian Proverb

Who glows not burns not. – Italian Proverb

Who goes himself is in earnest, who sends is indifferent. – Italian Proverb

Who goes not, sees not; who proves not, believes not. – Italian Proverb

Who goes slowly, goes wisely, and who goes wisely, goes far. – Italian Proverb

Who goes softly goes safely, and he that goes safely goes far. – Italian Proverb

Who goes to Rome a beast returns a beast. – Italian Proverb

Who has a tongue in his head can go all the world over. – Italian Proverb

Who has love in his heart has spurs in his sides. – Italian Proverb

Who has never done thinking never begins doing. – Italian Proverb

Who has no children does not know what love is. – Italian Proverb

Who has no courage must have legs. – Italian Proverb

Who has no head should have legs. – Italian Proverb

Who has no money in his purse must have honey in his mouth. – Italian Proverb

Who has no money must have no wishes. – Italian Proverb

Who has no plagues makes himself some. – Italian Proverb

Who has no shame all the world is his own. – Italian Proverb

Who has not is not. – Italian Proverb

Who has nothing fears nothing. – Italian Proverb

Who has nothing is nothing. – Italian Proverb

Who has patience may get fat thrushes at a farthing apiece. – Italian Proverb

Who has patience sees his revenge. – Italian Proverb

Who has something is something. – Italian Proverb

Who hath little shame the world is all his own. – Italian Proverb

Who hath no courage must have legs. – Italian Proverb

Who is born a fool is never cured. – Italian Proverb

Who is in fear of every leaf must not go into the wood. – Italian Proverb

Who is in the right fears, who is in the wrong hopes. – Italian Proverb

Who judges others, condemns himself. – Italian Proverb

Who keeps company with a wolf will learn to howl. – Italian Proverb

Who knows most believes least. – Italian Proverb

Who knows most says least. – Italian Proverb

Who knows most, forgives most. – Italian Proverb

Who knows most, knows least. – Italian Proverb

Who knows not how to dissemble knows not how to reign. – Italian Proverb

Who knows not how to flatter knows not how to talk. – Italian Proverb

Who knows not how to pray let him go sail the sea. – Italian Proverb

Who knows not the game, let him not play. – Italian Proverb

Who laughs at others’ ills, has his own behind the door. – Italian Proverb

Who lies down with dogs gets up with fleas. – Italian Proverb

Who loves the tree loves the branch. – Italian Proverb

Who loves to roam may lose his home. – Italian Proverb

Who loves well chastises well. – Italian Proverb

Who loves, believes. – Italian Proverb

Who loves, fears. – Italian Proverb

Who makes the wolf his companion should carry a dog under his cloak. – Italian Proverb

Who more busy than they who have least to do? – Italian Proverb

Who moves, picks up, who stands still, dries up. – Italian Proverb

Who offends writes on sand; who is offended, on marble. – Italian Proverb

Who paints me before blackens me behind. – Italian Proverb

Who pays a debt creates capital. – Italian Proverb

Who pays beforehand is served behindhand. – Italian Proverb

Who saves, saves for the cat. – Italian Proverb

Who says A must say B. – Italian Proverb

Who seeks a quarrel will find it near at hand. – Italian Proverb

Who serves the public, serves no one. – Italian Proverb

Who serves well and says nothing makes claim enough. – Italian Proverb

Who sows ill reaps ill. – Italian Proverb

Who sows thorns should not go barefoot. – Italian Proverb

Who suffers from love, feels no pain. – Italian Proverb

Who takes a lion at a distance fears a mole present. – Italian Proverb

Who takes an eel by the tail and a woman at her word, may say he holds nothing. – Italian Proverb

Who throws a stone at the sky, it falls back on his head. – Italian Proverb

Who troubles others has no rest himself. – Italian Proverb

Who will not be ruled by the rudder must be ruled by the rock. – Italian Proverb

Who wishes for a short Lent let him contract debts to be paid at Easter. – Italian Proverb

Who would have many friends let him test but few. – Italian Proverb

Who would make money must begin by spending it. – Italian Proverb

Who would not have feet set on his neck, let him not stoop. – Italian Proverb

Whoever brings finds the door open for him. – Italian Proverb

Whoever stays awake longest must blow out the candle. – Italian Proverb

Willows are weak, yet serve to bind bigger wood. – Italian Proverb

Wine is old men’s milk. – Italian Proverb

Wise lads and old fools were never good for anything. – Italian Proverb

Wise men change their minds, fools never. – Italian Proverb

Wise men learn by other men’s mistakes, fools by their own. – Italian Proverb

With art and knavery we live through half the year; with knavery and art we live through the other. – Italian Proverb

With so many roosters crowing, the sun never comes up. – Italian Proverb

With the first wife is matrimony, the second company, the third heresy. – Italian Proverb

With the fox one must play the fox. – Italian Proverb

With the Gospel men may become heretics. – Italian Proverb

With the skin of the dog its bite is cured. – Italian Proverb

With time and straw medlars ripen. – Italian Proverb

With wishing comes grieving. – Italian Proverb

Without debt without care. – Italian Proverb

Wolves do not eat each other. – Italian Proverb

Wolves don’t eat wolves. – Italian Proverb

Wolves have howled at the moon for centuries, yet it is still there. – Italian Proverb

Woman, impromptu; man, on reflection. – Italian Proverb

Women always speak the truth, but not the whole truth. – Italian Proverb

Women and hens are lost by too much gadding. – Italian Proverb

Women are wise impromptu, fools on reflection. – Italian Proverb

Women know a point more than the devil. – Italian Proverb

Women naturally deceive, weep and spin. – Italian Proverb

Women rouge that they may not blush. – Italian Proverb

Women, asses, and nuts, require strong hands. – Italian Proverb

Women, priests, and poultry, never have enough. – Italian Proverb

Women’s tears are a fountain of craft. – Italian Proverb

Words are female, deeds are male. – Italian Proverb

Words are for women, actions for men. – Italian Proverb

Words won’t feet cats. – Italian Proverb

Years and sins are always more than admitted. – Italian Proverb

Years know more than books. – Italian Proverb

Yes and no rule the world. – Italian Proverb

Yielding is sometimes the best way of succeeding. – Italian Proverb

You are my guide, my lord, and my master. – Italian Proverb

You can live without a brother but not without a friend. – Italian Proverb

You cannot damage a wrecked whip. – Italian Proverb

You cannot discover new oceans unless you have the courage to lose sight of the shore. – Italian Proverb

You cannot draw blood from a turnip. – Italian Proverb

You cannot make the mule drink when he is not thirsty. – Italian Proverb

You cannot write down a meaningful silence. – Italian Proverb

You don’t go to heaven in a carriage. – Italian Proverb

You have married a beauty? So much the worse for you. – Italian Proverb

You must grease the wheels if you would have the car run. – Italian Proverb

You must marry a widow while she is still mourning. – Italian Proverb

You must shift your sail with the wind. – Italian Proverb

You must take the fat with the lean. – Italian Proverb

You surround your vineyard with thorns – place doors and locks on your mouth. – Italian Proverb

You will never have a friend if you must have one without faults. – Italian Proverb

You will not be loved if you think of yourself alone. – Italian Proverb

Your enemy makes you wiser. – Italian Proverb

Italian Proverbs

Italian Proverbs with English Translation

A buon cavallo non occorre dirgli trotta.
No need to say “trot” to a good horse.

A buon intenditor poche parole.
“Few words to the good knowledgeable.”
Few words to the good listener. A word to the wise is enough.

A buon intenditor poche parole.
To the connoisseur merely a few words suffice.

A buon vino non bisogna frasca.
Good wine needs no bush.

A buona derrata pensaci su.
At a good bargain pause and ponder.

A chi la riesce bene, è tenuto per savio.
He who succeeds is reputedly wise.

A chi vuol fare, non manca che fare.
To him who is determined it remains only to act.

A tutti non si adatta una sola scarpa.
The same shoe does not fit every foot.

A veste logorata poca fede vien prostata.
A ragged coat finds little credit.

Abbi piuttosto il piccolo per amico, che il grande per nemico.
Rather have a little one for your friend, than a great one for your enemy.

Accosta più la camicia che il giubbone.
The shirt is nearer than the doublet.

Acqua torbida non fa specchio.
Murky water won’t do for a mirror.

Ad ogni uccello il suo nido è bello.
Each bird likes his nest.

Aiutati, che il ciel ti aiuta.
Help yourself and heaven will help you.

Al parlar si scorge l’uomo.
In the speech you recognize the man.

Al povero mancano tante cose, all’avaro tutte.
The poor man is lacking many things, the greedy man all.
It would be a warning that the greedy are never satisfied.

Albero spesso trapiantato mai di frutti è caricato.
A tree often transplanted is never loaded with fruit.

Alla nascita dell’amore gli amanti parlano del futuro; al suo declino parlano del passato.
At the beginning of love the lovers talk of the future, and if their love wanes they talk of the past.

Altra cosa è: il dire, altra il fare.
Saying is one thing, doing another.

Altro è promettere, altro mantenere.
It is one thing to promise something, another to keep it.

Ama l’ amico tuo col vizio suo.
Love your friend with his faults.

Amante non sia chi non ha coraggio
A lover is not the one without courage.

Amare e non essere amato e tempo perso.
To love and not be loved is loss of time.

Amicizia de’ grandi vicinanza di leoni.
The friendship of the great is fraternity with lions.

Amico di tutti e di nessuno e tutt’uno.
A friend to all and a friend to none is one and the same.

Anche i pesci hanno del re spine.
The king’s fishes have bones, they too.

Anche il pazzo talvolta dice qualche parola da savio.
Even the fool says a wise word sometimes.

Ancor le volpi, vecchie rimangono al lacchio.
Even old foxes are caught in the snare.

Aria netta non ha paura del tuono.
Clean air is not afraid of thunder.

Asino che ha fame mangia d’ ogni strame.
A hungry donkey eats any straw.

Aspetta il porco alia quercia.
Look for the hog at the oak.

Assai eè ricco à chi non manca.
He is rich enough who does not want.

Assai guadagna, chi vano sperar perde.
He gains much who loses a vain hope.

Avere le mani in pasta.
To have a finger in the pie. (Participate financially or, more generally, to have personal interests.)

Ben faremo, ben diremo, mal va la barca senza remo.
Say what we will, do what we will, the boat goes but sorrily without oars.

Benché la volpe corra, i pallottoli hanno le ale.
Though the fox runs, the bullets have wings. – TK

Benché la volpe corra, i polli hanno le ale.
Though the fox runs, the pullets have wings.

Bisogna sentir le due campane.
We need to listen to both bells
(both sides, both versions – there may be at least two sides to a tale.).

Buoni avvocati sono cattivi vicini.
Good lawyers are bad neighbours.

Castello che dá orecchia si vuol rendere.
The fortress that parleys soon surrenders.

Cattiva è quella lana che non si può tingere.
Bad is the wool that cannot be died.

Che sarà, sarà.
What will be, will be.

Chi affoga, grida ancor che non sia udito.
He that is drowning shouts though he be not heard.

Chi altri giudica, rischia sè condanna. – TK
Who judges others, risks condemning himself.

Chi ben vive, ben predica.
He preaches well who lives well.

Chi bene vive, bene dorme.
Who lives well sleeps well.

Chi cerca un amico senza difetti resta senz’amico.
Who looks for a friend without faults remains without one.

Chi cerca, trova, e talor quel che non vorrebbe.
He that seeks, finds, and sometimes what he would rather not.

Chi compra terra, compra guerra.
Who buys land buys war.

Chi dà presto, dà il doppio.
He gives twice who gives in a trice.

Chi dorme non piglia pesci.
He who sleeps catches no fish. The early bird catches the worm.

Chi dorme non piglia pesci.
Who is sleeping, does not catch any fish.

Chi due lepri cacchia, l’una non piglia e l’ altra lascia.
He who hunts two hares does not catch the one and lets the other escape.

Chi è causa del suo male, piange se stesso.
He who has created his own evil cries over the same.
(When suffering the regrets or the tougher consequences.)
He who is the cause of his own misfortune may bewail it himself.

Chi è in inferno non sá ció che sia cielo.
He who is in hell knows not what heaven is.

Chi eon l’ occhio vede, di cuor crede.
Seeing is believing.

Chi fabbrica vicino alla strada, ha molti sindicatori.
He who builds by the roadside has many surveyors.

Chi fonda in sul popolo, fonda in sulla rena.
Who builds on the mob builds on sand.

Chi ha amico, è ricco.
Who has friends is rich.

Chi ha capo di cera, non vada al sole.
He who has a head of wax must not walk in the sun.

Chi ha l’ amor nel petto, ha lo sprone a’ fianchi.
Who has love in his heart has spurs in his sides.

Chi ha passato il guado, sa quant’ aoqua tiene.
He who has crossed the ford knows how deep it is.

Chi ha poca vergogna, tutto il mondo è suo.
Who hath little shame the world is all his own.

Chi ha qualche cosa, è qualche cosa.
Who has something is something.

Chi ha un sol porco, facilmente l’ingrassa.
He that has but one pig easily fattens it.

Chi ha veramente fame, non ha bisogno di condimenti.
Who is really hungry, needs no seasoning.

Chi il suo cane vuole ammazzare, quacke scusa sa pigliare.
Give a dog a bad name and hang him.

Chi la vuol lessa e chi arrosto.
Some want it cooked and some want it fried.

Chi lascia stare i fatti suoi per fare quelli degli altri ha poco senno.
Who lets go of minding his own business so as to tend to the business of others, has poor judgement.

Chi nasce da gallina, convien che ruspi.
Whoever is born of a hen it behooves to scrape.

Chi nasce matto, non guarisce mai.
Who is born a fool is never cured.

Chi niente sa, di niente dubita.
He who knows nothing, doubts nothing.

Chi non fa, non falla.
He who does nothing makes no mistakes.

Chi non ha altro che quattrini, è un povero diavolo.
Who has nothing but money is a poor devil.

Chi non ha figliuoli, non sa che cosa sia amore.
Who has no children does not know what love is.

Chi non ha nulla, non è nulla.
Who has nothing is nothing.

Chi non risica non rosica.
Nothing ventured nothing gained.

Chi non rompe le uova, non fa la frittata.
There is no making pancakes without breaking the eggs.

Chi non sa dissimulare, non sa regnare.
Who knows not how to dissemble knows not how to reign.

Chi non stima altri che sè, è felice quanto un re.
He who esteems none but himself is as happy as a king.

Chi non va, non vede; chi non prova, non crede.
Who goes not, sees not; who proves not, believes not.

Chi non vede il fondo, non passi I’acqua.
Don’t cross the water unless you see the bottom.

Chi parla, semina; chi tace, raccoglie.
The talker sows, the listener reaps.

Chi piacer fa, piacere ha.
Who prepares for pleasure, can have pleasure.*

Chi pinge il fiore, non gli da l’odore.
He that paints a flower does not give it perfume.

Chi più sa, meno parla.
Who knows most says least.

Chi raro viene, vien bene.
Who comes seldom, is welcome.

Chi rompe, paga ed i suoi sono cocci.

Who breaks a thing shall pay it and keep the pieces.

Chi sa la strada, può andar di trotto.
He who knows the road can ride full trot.

Chi serve al commune, ha cattivo padrone.
He who serves the public has a sorry master.

Chi si assomiglia si piglia.
Birds of a feather flock together.

Chi si fa pecorella, i lupi la mangiano.
Make yourself a sheep and the wolves will eat you.

Chi si loda, s’imbroda.
He who praises himself befouls himself.

Chi va piano, va sano e va lontano.
“He who goes slowly goes safely and goes far.”

Chi va piano, va sano e va lontano.
Who goes gently, goes healthily and a long way.

Chi vivrà vedrà.
Who will live, will see.

Chi vuol ammazzar il suo cane, basta che dica ch’è arrabbiato.
He who wants his dog killed has only to say he is mad.

Chi vuol andar salvo per lo mondo, bisogna aver occhio di falcone, orecchio d’asino, viso di scimia, bocca di porcello, spalle di camello, è gambe di cervo.
To go safely through the world you must have the eye of a falcon, the ear of an ass, the face of an ape, the mouth of a pig, the shoulders of a camel, and the legs of a deer.

Chi vuol arricchire in un anno, è impiccato in aei men.
He who would he rich in a year gets hanged in six months.

Chi vuol assai, non dimandi poco.
He who wants a good deal must not ask for a little.

Chi vuol esser lungo tempo vecchio, bisogna cominciar a buon’ ora.
He who would he long an old man must begin betimes.

Chi vuol molti amici, non n’ha nessuno.
He that seeks to have many friends never has any.

Chi vuol turar la bocca a tutti, bisogna che abbia assai farina.
He who would stop every man’s mouth must have a great deal of meal.

Chi vuole una cosa e chi un’altra.
One man wants one thing and another wants another thing.

Ci è chi vede male, e vorrebbe veder peggio.
There are some who see ill, and would like to see worse.

Chi non va non vede, chi non vede non sa e chi non sa se lo prende sempre in culo.
If you don’t go you won’t see, if you don’t see you won’t know, if you don’t know you’ll take it in the ass every time.

Col Vangelo si puo diventare eretici.
With the Gospel men may become heretics.

Con poco cervello si governa il mondo.
The world is governed with little brains.

Confessare che si è timidi, è smettere di esserlo.
Confess that you are timid, and you cease to be so.

Contro amore non è consiglio.
Counsel is nothing against love.

Contro la forza la ragion non vale.
Reason avails not against brute force.

Credi al vantatore come al mentitore.
Believe a boaster as you would a liar.

Cuando l’amico chiede, non v’è domani.
When a friend asks, there is no tomorrow.

Dal detto al fatto vi è un gran tratto.
From saying to doing is a long way.

Dal frutta si l’albero conoscere.
The tree is known by its fruit [too].

Dare a Cesare quel che è di Cesare.
Give Caesar what belongs to Caesar.
So: Give credit where credit is due.

Decente lavoro nobilita l’uomo.
Decent work enobles man.

Del tutto non è savio chi non sa far il pazzo.
He is not a thorough wise man who cannot play the fool on occasion.

Del vero s’adira l’uomo.
It is truth that makes a man angry.

Di denaro non si parla, si lo ha.
Do not talk of money: have it.

Di rado visto, presto scordato.
Seldom seen soon forgotten.

Dico a te figliuola, intendilo tu nuora.
I speak to you, daughter; hear it, daughter-in-law.

Dimmi con chi vai, e ti dirò chi sei.
Tell me the company you keep, and I’ll tell you what you are.

Dio mi guardi da chi studia un libro solo.
God save me from him who studies but one book.

Domandar chi nacque prima, I’uovo o la gallina.
Ask whick was born first, the hen or the egg.

Donna di finestra, uva di strada.
A woman who loves to be at the window is like a bunch of grapes at the wayside.

Dope il radere non ci è più che tosare.
After shaving there is nothing to shear.

Dopo che i cavalli sono presi, serrar la stalla.
To lock the stable after the horses are taken.

Dopo la pioggia viene il sereno.
After rain it clears up.

Dove bisognan rimedj, il sospirar non vale.
Where remedies are needed, sighing awaits not.

Dove ci sono pecore abbonda la lana.
Where there are sheep, there is plenty of wool.

Dove entra il vino, esce la vergogna.
When wine enters modesty departs.

Dove il dente duole, la lingua v’inchiampa.
The tongue goes to where the tooth aches.

Dove il flume ha pitt fondo, fa minor strepito.
Where the river is deepest it makes least noise.

Dove non basta la pelle del leone, bisogna attaccarsi a quella della volpe.
When we lack lion skins, fox skins will do.

Dove non sono capelli, si pettina times.
Where there is no hair, no combing will work.

Dove non sono i cani, la volpe è re.
Where there are no dogs the fox is a king.

Dove sono molti cuochi, la minestra sarà troppo salata.
Where there are too many cooks the soup will he too salt.

Dove stringe la scarpa, non lo sa altro che chi l’ha in piede.
Where the shoe pinches, no one knows but he who wears it,

E bene aver degli amici per tutto.
It is good to have friends everywhere.

E facile far paura al tore dalla finestra.
It is easy to threaten a bull from a window.

E la peggior ruota quella che fa più rumore.
The worst wheel creaks most.

E meglio esser solo che mal accompagnato.
Better alone than in bad company.

E sempre buono aver due corde al suo arco.
It is always good to have two strings to your bow.

È troppo bello per essere vero.
It’s too good to be true.

E un cattivo boccone quelle che affoga.
It’s a bad mouthful that chokes you.

Far d’una mosca un elefante.
To make an elephant of a fly.

Fare è dire son due cose.
Saying and doing are two things.

Fidarsi è bene, non fidarsi è meglio.
Reliance is good; no reliance is better.

Fidarsi è bene, non fidarsi è meglio.
To trust is good, not to trust is better.

Finche vi è fiato v è speranza.
While there’s life there’s hope.

Fra galantuomini parola è instrumento.
Among men of honour a word is a bond.

Freno indorato non megliora il cavallo.
A golden bit makes none the better horse.

Gli amori nuovi fanno dimenticare i vecchi.
New love drives out the old.

Gli errori del medico gli copre la terra.
The earth covers the errors of the physician.

Guarda che tu non lasci la coda nell’ uscio.
Take care you don’t let your tail be caught in the door.

Guarda innanzi che tu salti.
Look before you leap.

Guardatevi dal “Se io avessi sospettato.”
Beware of “Had I but known.”

Guardati da alchimista povero.
Beware of a poor alchemist.

I danari sono tondi, e girano.
Money is round, and rolls.

I mosconi rompon le tele de’ ragni.
Big flies break the spider’s web.

I principi hanno le braccia lunghe.
Princes have long arms.

Il buon sangue giammai non puo in entire.
Oood blood never Ues.

Il buon vino non vuole frasca.
A good wine does not need a large branch to cling to.

Il campanello di camera è il peggior suono che si possa nvere negli orecchi.
The chamber-bell (chamber-clapper, or curtain lecture) is the worst sound one can have in his ears.

Il can battuto dal bastone, ha paura dell’ ombra.
The dog that has been beaten with a stick is afraid of its shadow.

Il can che vuol mordere, non abbaia.
The dog that means to bite don’t bark.

Il cane scottato dall’ acqua calda, ha paura della fredda.
The scalded dog fears cold water.

Il diavolo tenta tutti, ma l’ozioso tenta il diavolo.
The devil tempts all, but the idle man tempts the devil.

Il fin loda l’ opera.
The end praises the work.

Il mattino ha l’oro in bocca.
The morning has gold in its mouth.
(Morning hours are precious.)

Il meglio subirlo torto che farlo.
Better endure wrong than do wrong.

Il pane mangiato è presto dimenticato.
Eaten bread is soon forgotten.

Il pesce grande mangia il picciolo.
The big fish eat the little.

Il pesce grosso mangia il pesce piccolo.
The big fish eats the small fish.

Il primier colpo per due colpi vale.
The first blow is as good as two.

Il sangue del soldato fa grande il capitano.
The soldier’s blood exalts the captain.

Il stroppia troppo.
Too much is unhealthy.

Il tempo apre gli occhi.
Time is [quite] an eye-opener.

Il tempo è galantuomo.
Time is a gentleman.

Ilbuon pastore tosa, è non scortica.
The good shepherd shears, not flays.

Il tempo passa e non ritorna.
Time passes and does not return.

In lungo viaggio, anche una paglia pesa.
On a long journey even a straw is heavy.

In terra di beato chi ha un occhio ciechi solo.
In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is “blessed”.

Invan si pesca se l’amo non ha l’esca.
You fish in vain if the hook has no bait.

L’ abito è una seconda natura.
Custom is second nature.
L’ abito non fa il monaco.
The gown does not make the friar.

L’ aquila non fa guerra ai rauocchi.
The eagle does not war against frogs.

L’ erba del vicino è sempre più verde.
The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. 

La barba non fa il filosofo.
The beard does not make the philosopher.

La botte piena non fa rumore.
The full cask makes no noise.

La carità comincia a casa propia.
Charity begins at home (your own home).

La famiglia è la patria del cuore.
Home (or in this case, family) is where the heart is.

La gallina che canta ha fatto l’uovo.
The hen that cackles has laid an egg.

La guerra fa i ladri, e la pace gl’ impicca.
War makes robbers, and peace hangs them.

La moglie e il ronzino piglia dal vicino.
For a wife and a horse go to your neighbour.

La pecora rognosa infetta il gregge.
The scabby sheep infects the flock.

La pin lunga strada è la piu prossima a caso.
The longest way round is the shortest way home.

La prudenza non è mai troppa.
Prudence is never too much.
[Caution, heedfulness, good sense, forethought . . .]

La salute è un tesoro che nessuno quando lo possiede apprezza.
Health is a treasure that no one appreciates as long as he has it.

La scimmia è sempre scimmia, anche vestita di seta.
The monkey is always a monkey, even when dressed in silk.

La speranza è l’ultima a morire sempre.
The hope always dies last.

La troppa curiosità spinge l’uccello nella rete.
Too much curiosity drives the bird into the net.

La troppa bonezza finisce nella monnezza.
Too much goodness ends up in the trash.
Italian way of saying that “nice guys finish last.

La veste bianca non fa molinaro.
The white coat does not make the miller.

La vita è come un albero di natale, c’è sempre qualcuno che rompe le palle.
Life is like a Christmas tree, there is always someone who breaks the balls.

L’abito non fa il monaco.
The cowl does not make the monk.

L’apparenza inganna.
Appearances can be deceiving.

L’avaro non possiede l’oro, ma è posseduto dall’oro.
The miser does not own the gold; the gold owns him.

Le donne ne sanno una di più del diavolo.
The women know a bit more than the devil.

Le donne sanno un punto piu del diavolo.
Women know a point more than the devil.

Le rose cascano, e le spine rimangono.
The roses fall, and the thorns remain.

Le vesti degli avvocati sono foderate dell’ ostinazion dei litiganti.
Lawyers’ robes are lined with the obstinacy of suitors.

L’esercizio fa il maestro.
Practice makes the master.

Loda il mar, e tienti alia terra.
Praise the sea and keep on land.

Lontano dagli occhi, lontano dal cuore.
Far from the eyes, far from the heart.

L’opera loda il maestro.
The work praises the master.

L’uomo senza moglie è un’albero senza foglie.
A man without a wife is like a tree without leaves.

Lupo lupo non mangia.
Wolf does not eat wolf.

Meglio è aver il marito senza amore che con gelosia.
It is better to have a husband without love than jealous.

Meglio esser uccel di bosco che uccel di Palazzo.
Better be a bird in the forest than a bird in the palace

Meglio soli che male accompagnati.
Better be alone than in bad company.

Meglio un uovo oggi che una gallina domani.
Rather an egg today than a hen tomorrow.

Mentre l’ erba cresce il cavallo muore di fame.
While the grass grows the steed starves.

Mille verisimili non fanno un vero.
A thousand probabilities do not make one truth.

Moglie e buoi dei paesi tuoi.
Marry a woman from your own neighbourhood.
(You can have much in common.)

Molto più fanno gli anni che i libri.
Years teach (know) more than books.

Morto io, morto ognun, ed il porco.
When I’m dead, everybody’s dead, and the pig too.

Morto un papa se ne fa un altro.
When one pope dies, another is chosen.

Nella prosperità non fumano gli altari.
In prosperity no altars smoke.

Nell’eternità si arriva sempre a tempo.
In eternity you’re always on time.

Nessun sente da che parte preme la scarpa, se non chi se la calza.
No one perceives where the shoe pinches but he who wears it.

Non è tutto oro quel che luccica.
All that glitters is not gold.

Non cercare la falce quando è già tempo di mietre.
Do not search for the scythe when it’s time to reap. [Have it ready in good time.]

Non giudicar la nave stando in terra.
Do not judge of the ship from the land.

Non laaciar chiodo che non el ributti.
Leave no nail unclenched.

Non lodare il giorno prima della sera.
Do not praise the day until the evening.

Non ogni flora fa buon odore.
It is not every flower that smells sweet.

Non si deve giudicare dall’apparenza.
We should not judge by appearances.

Non si deve lasciar il certo per l’incerto.
One should not give up the certain for the uncertain.

Non si può avere la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca.
You can not have the barrel full and the woman drunk.

Non si può bere (tenere la farina in bocca) e fischiare (soffiare).
One cannot drink and whistle at the same time.

Non tuona mai che non piova.
It never thunders but it rains.

Non tutte le pecore sono per il lupo.
All the sheep are not for the wolf.

Non tutte le pecore sono per il orco.
All the sheep are not for the troll. – TK

Non tutti quelli che hanno lettere sono savi.
Not all those who are learned are wise.

Non v’ è rosa senza spina.
No rose without a thorn.

Non vender la pelle dell’ orso prima di pigliarlo.
Don’t sell the bearskin before you have caught the hear.

O mangiar questa minestra o saltar questa finestra.
Either eat this soup or jump out out this window. It means “Take it or leave it.”

Oggi a te, domani a me.
Today to you, tomorrow to me. 

Ogni cosa ha il suo valore.
Everything has its value.

Ogni erba diventa paglia.
Each grass becomes straw. Jedes Gras wird zu Stroh.

Ogni lucciola non è fuoco.
Every glowworm is not afire.

Ogni pazzo vuol dar consiglio.
Every fool wants to give advice.

Ognun biasima il suo mestiere.
Every one finds fault with his own trade.

Ognuno è figlio delle proprie azioni.
Everyone is the son of his own deeds.

Ognuno ha il suo destino.
Everyone has his destiny.

Oro non è tutto quel che risplende.
All is not gold that glitters.

Paese che vai, usanza che trovi.
The country you visit, its customs you will find. So: When in Rome, do (much) as the Romans do.

Passa la festa, ed il matto resta.
The feast passes and the fool remains.

Passato il fiume, è scordato il santo.
The river passed the saint forgotten.

Patti chiari, amici cari.
Clear agreements, good friends.

Pensa molto, parla poco, e scrivi meno.
Think much, speak little, and write less.

Per conoscere un furbo ci vuole un furbo e mezzo.
To recognize a human fox [a cunning one] it takes a fox and a half.

Perde le lagrime chi piange avanti al giudice.
He wastes his tears who weeps before the judge.

Pianta la vite per te, e l’ulivo per tuo figlio.
Plant the vine for yourself and the olive tree for your child.

Piccoli figli piccoli affanni, grandi figli grandi affanni.
Small children, small worries; bigger children, bigger worries.

Pietra mossa non fa muschio.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.

Pigliamo prima l’ orso, e poi vendiamo la pelle.
Let us first catch the bear and then sell its skin.

Più denaro, più preoccupazioni.
The more money, the more concerns (preoccupations, worries).

Più vale guadagnar in loto, che perder in oro.
Better gain in mud than lose in gold.

Poco e spesso riempe il borsellino.
Little and often fills the purse.

Poco ingegno molta vanità.
Little intelligence, much vanity.

Povertà non ha parenti.
Poverty has no kin.

Prima di cercar moglie, cerca casa.
Before you look for a wife, look for a house.

Prima di condannare bisogna capire.
Before you judge, you need to understand.

Primary di parlare, pensa.
Before you speak, consider.

Protestare e dare del capo nel muro, lo può fare ognuno.
To protest and knock one’s head against the wall is what everybody can do.

Quando a Roma vai, fa come vedrai.
When you go to Rome, do as you will see there.

Quando finisce la partita il re ed il pedone finiscono nella stessa scatola.
When you finish the game, the king and pawn end up in the same box. We all meet the same end.

Quando il leone è morto, le lepri gli saltano addosso.
When the lion is dead the hares jump upon his carcass.

Quando il ricco cade, si alla grida disgrazia; se è un povero, si grida all’ubriachezza.
If the rich man falls, people say it’s an accident; if a poor man falls, people say he was drunk.

Quando la gatta non c’è, i topi ballano.
When the cat is away the mice will play.

Quando una donna si sposa, cambia la cortesia di molti uomini con la scortesia di uno.
When a woman marries, she changes the courtesy of many men for the unkindness of one.

Quattrino risparmiato, due volte guadagnato.
A farthing saved is twice earned.

Quelli che imparano dalla storia non sono necessariamente condannati a ripeterlo.
Those who learn from history are not necessarily condemned to repeat it. tk

Ritornan molti dalla guerra che non sanno raccontar la battaglia.
Many return from the war who cannot give an account of the battle.

Roma fu costruita pietra su pietra.
Rome was built stone by stone.

Sacco vuoto non sta in piedi.
An empty sack won’t stand upright.

Sacco vuoto non sta ritto.
An empty sack won’t stand upright.

Sanno più un savio ed un matto, che un savio solo.
A wise man and a fool together, know more than a wise man alone.

Savio è colui che impara a spese altrui.
He is wise who learns at another’s cost.

Sbagliando s’impara.
You learn from your mistakes.

Sciocco è chi pensa che un altro non pensi.
He is a fool who thinks that another does not think.

Se ben ho perso l’ anello, ho pur anche le dita.
If I have lost the ring I still have the fingers.

Se sono rose, fioriranno.
If they are roses, they will flower as roses. So: Time will tell.

Se ti lasci metter in spalla il vitello, quindi a poco ti metteranno la vacca.
If you let them put the calf on your shoulders, it will not be long before they clap on the cow.

Se un uomo dicesse tutto ciò che pensa, nessuno gli crederebbe.
If a man were to say all he thinks, no one would believe him.

Si pigliano più mosche in una gocciola di miele che in un barile d’aceto.
You can catch more flies with honey than a barrel of vinegar.

Son gli amici molto rari quando non si ha denari.
Friends are very rare when you have no money.

Superbo è quel cavallo che non si vuol portar la binda.
It’s a very proud horse that will not carry his oats.

Taglia la coda al cane, e’ riman cane.
Cut off the dog’s tail, he remains a dog.

Tal canta che allegro non è.
Some sing who are not merry.

Tal ha belli occhi che niente vi vede.
One may have good eyes and see nothing.

Tal sprezza la superbia con una maggior superbia.
There are some who despise pride with a greater pride.

Tardi furon savj i Troiani.
The Trojans were wise too late.

Tardi si vien con l’ acqua quando la casa è arsa.
It is too late to come with water when the house is burnt down.

Traduttori, traditori.
Translators, traitors.

Troppi cuochi guastan la cucina.
Many cooks spoil the food.

Un chiodo caocia l’ altro.
One nail drives out another.

Un pazzo getta una pietra nel pozzo, e vi voglion cento savii a cavarnela.
A fool throws a stone into a well, and it requires a hundred wise men to get it out again.

Un santo triste è un tristo santo.
A sad saint is a sad (poor) saint.

Una bugia tira l’altra.
One lie draws others after it.

Una buona moglie fa un buon marito.
A good wife makes a good husband.

Una casa propria è un piccolo regno.
Your own home is a small kingdom.

Una pecora rognosa ne guasta un branco.
One scabby sheep spoils a flock.

Uno un altro sciocco sempre sciocco trova che lo ammira.
A fool will always find another fool who admires him.

Uomo lento non ha mai tempo.
A slothful man never has time.

Uomo morto non fa guerra.
A dead man does not make war.

Uomo solitario, o bestia o angiolo.
A solitary man is either a brute or an angel.

Vaso che va spesso al fonte, ci lascia il manico o la fronte.
The pitcher that goes often to the fountain leaves there either its handle or its spout.
(A pitcher that goes often to the well is broken at last).

Vaso vuoto suona meglio.
Empty vessels make most noise.

Vecchi peccati ombre hanno lunghe.
Old sins have long shadows.

Vedi Napoli è poi muori.
See Naples and then die.

Vedono meglio quattro occhi che due.
Four eyes see better than two.

Virtù di silenzio è gran scienza.
The virtue of silence is a great piece of knowledge.

Vive più il minacciato che ‘l impiccato.
A threatened man lives longer than one who is hanged.

Zelo cieco porta solo danno.
Blind zeal brings nothing but harm.

 

Italian Proverbs

Italian Proverbs, Translations and Meanings

  • A cane scottato l ‘acqua fredda pare calda.
    • English equivalent: Once bitten twice shy.
  • A chi bene crede, Dio provvede.
    • English equivalent: God listens to those who have faith/ Have faith and God shall provide.
  • A chi parla poco, gli basta la metà del cervello.
    • English equivalent: Least said, soonest mended.
    • “In private animosities and verbal contentions, where angry passions are apt to rise, and irritating, if not profane expressions are often made use of – the least said, the better in general. By multiplying words, cases often grow worse instead of better.”
  • A chi vuole, non mancano modi.
    • English equivalent: Where there is a will, there is a way.
    • “If you are sufficiently determined to achieve something, then you will find a way of doing so.”
  • A mali estremi, estremi rimedi.
    • English equivalent: Desperate times call for desperate measures.
    • “Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation.”
  • A goccia a goccia s’incava la pietra.
    • English equivalent: Constant dropping wears away the stone.
    • “A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books.” (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
  • Ad ogni pazzo piace il suon del suo sonaglio.
    • English equivalentː Every fool is pleased with his own folly.
  • Ad ogni uccello il proprio nido è bello.
    • English equivalent: The bird loves her own nest.
  • Aggiungere legno al fuoco.
    • English equivalent: To add fuel to the fire.
  • Al buon vino non bisogna frasca.
    • English equivalent: Good wine needs no bush.
    • “A good product does not need advertising.”
  • Al piu potente ceda il più prudente.
    • English equivalent: Better bow than break.
    • “It is better to make some confession, or pay a little deference to others, our neighbors, friends, acquaintances, and especially our superiors, rather than lose our credit or break friendship.”
  • Alla buona derrata, pensaci su.
    • English equivalent: The best goods are cheapest in the end.
  • Anche il pazzo dice talvolta parole da savio.
    • English equivalent: Even a fool may give a wise man counsel.
  • Anche il sole passa sopra il fango, e non s’imbratta.
    • Translation: The sun passes over filth and is not defiled.
  • Anche in paradiso non è bello essere soli.
    • English equivalent: There is no greater torment than to be alone in paradise.
  • Amare e non essere amato, quanto risponde sens esser chiamato.
    • English Equivilent: To love and be loved as it is meant to be
  • Amicizia di signore non è retaggio; chi troppo se ne fida non è saggio.
    • English equivalent: A king’s favour is no inheritance.
  • Amor, tosse e fumo, malemente si nascondono.
    • English equivalent: Love, smoke and cough are hard to hide.
  • Amor tutti eguaglia.
    • English equivalent: Love makes all equal.
  • Anche la legna storta dà fuoco diritto.
    • English equivalent: Crooked logs make straight fires.
  • Andara a Roma senza vedere il papa.'”
    • English equivalent: He was in Rome and did not see the pope.
  • A caval donato non si guarda in bocca.
    • English equivalent: Look not a gift horse in the mouth.
    • “And so with respect to gifts and donations in general, whether their value be more or less, they should be accounted tokens of kindness and received with promptness and cordiality.”
  • A carne di lupo, zanne di cane.
    • English equivalent: You must meet roughness with roughness.
  • A chi dai il dito si prende anche il braccio.
    • English equivalent: Give an inch and they’ll take a mile.
  • A chi Dio vuol castigare leva il cervello.
    • English equivalent: Whom God will destroy, he first make mad.
  • A torto si lagna del mare chi due volte ci vuol tornare.
    • English equivalent: He complains wrongfully at the sea that suffer shipwreck twice.
  • Aiutati che Dio ti aiuta
    • English equivalent: Help yourself, and God will help you.
    • “When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition.”
  • Al confessore, medico e avvocato, non tenere il ver celato.
    • English equivalent: Conceal not the truth from thy physcian and lawyer.
  • Assai pampini e poca uva.
    • English equivalent: He that promises too much means nothing.
  • Aspetta, caval, che l’erba cresca.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows the steed starves.
  • Batti il ferro finché è caldo.
    • Translation: Strike while the iron is hot.
  • Bella Cosa tosto è rapita.
    • English equivalent: All that is fair must fade.
    • “Nothing lasts forever.”
  • Bella in vista, dentro è trista.
    • English equivalent: A fair face and a foul heart.
  • Ben finisce chi considera il fine.
    • Translation: He ends well who considers the end.
    • English equivalent: Whatever you do, act wisely, and consider the end.
  • Bisogna accomodarsi ai tempi.
    • English equivalent: Gnaw the bone which is fallen to thy lot.
  • Bisogna che si levi di buon’ora chi desidera piacere a tutti.
    • English equivalent: He had need rise early who would please everybody.
    • Meaning: “It is impossible to do something that everybody will approve of.”
  • Bisogna prima pensare e poi fare.
    • English equivalent: A closed mouth catches no flies.
  • Bisogna rischiare la scardola per avere il salmone.
    • Translation: Who wants to win a gander, you need to weigh Drake.
    • English equivalent: Set a herring to catch a whale.
  • Bisogna saper afferrare l’occasione pei capelli.
    • English equivalent: Opportunity knocks only once.
  • Bocca di miele, cuore di fiele.
    • English equivalent: A honey tongue and a heart of gall.
  • Breve orazione penetra.
    • English equivalent: Short prayers reach heaven.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 75.
  • Buon principio fa buon fine.
    • English equivalent: A good beginning makes a good ending; Well begun, is half done.
    • Meaning: Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process.
  • Buon seme dà buoni frutti.
    • Translation: Good tree makes good fruit.
    • English equivalent: The fruit of a good tree is also good.
    • Meaning: Good parents will make good children due to example followed closely and daily.
  • È meglio qualche cosa che niente
    • English equivalent: Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
  • Can che abbaia non morde.
    • Translation: The dog that barks doesn’t bite.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • Meaning: People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
  • Camminare sopra il filo di un rasoio.
    • English equivalent: Do not play with edged tools.
  • Carta canta.
    • English equivalent: A great friend is Plato, but a greater friend is truth.
    • “No schooling was allowed to interfere with my education.”
    • Attributed to Grant Allen, The New Illustrated magazine (1901)
  • Cavallo riscaldato, (e garzon ritornato), non fu mai buono.
    • English equivalent: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
    • Meaning: Your former enemies might cunningly take revenge on you just out of spite.; Trust not a reconciled enemy more than an open foe.
  • Chiave d’oro apre ogni porta.
    • English equivalent: A golden key opens any gate but that of heaven.
  • Chi affoga s’attaccherrebbe alle funi del cielo
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
  • Chi ama me, ama il mio cane.
    • Translation: Whoever loves me, loves my dog.
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my dog.
    • Meaning: If you love someone, you will virtually like everything about him.
  • Chi aspettar suole, ha ciò che vuole.
    • English equivalent. He that can have patience can have what he will.
    • Other English equivalent: Patience is a remedy for every sorrow.
  • Chi ben commincia è meta dell’opra.
    • Translation: Who well begins, is half way through his task.
    • Meaning. Having made the right preparations when beginning a project will save you a lot of time.
  • Chi da se stesso può fare alcuna cosa, non aspetti che altri la faccia.
    • Translation: Who by himself can do anything, do not wait for others to do.
    • English equivalent: For what thou canst do thyself, rely not on another.
    • Latin equivalent: Ne quid expectes amicos, quod tute agere possis.
      • Translation: Expect nothing from friends, do what you can do yourself.
  • Chi di gallina nasce, convien che razzoli.
    • Translation: As the abbot sings, so the sacristan responds.
    • Meaning: Children will become like older generations.
  • Chi di gatta nasce, sorci piglia.
    • English equivalent: What is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh.
    • Meaning: You can seldom change human nature with the help of logic.
  • Chi disordani da giovane se ne pente da vecchio.
    • English equivalent: They who would be young when they are old must be old when they are young.
  • Chi due lepri caccia, l’una non piglia, e l’altra lascia.
    • English equivalent: You must not run after two hares at the same time.
    • Meaning: “Concentrate on one thing at a time or you will achieve nothing. – Trying to do two or more things at a time, when even one on its own needs full effort, means that none of them will be accomplished properly.”
  • ‘’Chi ha bisogna s’arrenda.’’
    • English equivalent: Beggars can’t be choosers.
    • “We must accept with gratitude and without complaint what we are given when we do not have the means or opportunity to provide ourselves with something better.”
  • Chi ha bisogno, domandi.
    • English equivalent: Lose nothing for want of asking.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 116.
  • Chi ha capo di cera non vada al sole.
    • Translation: Who has a head of wax should not be in the sunshine.
    • English equivalent: He that hath a head of wax must not walk in the sun.
    • “If you go looking for a friend, you’re going to find they’re very scarce. If you go out to be a friend, you’ll find them everywhere.”
    • Zig Ziglar as quoted in The Power of Respect : Benefit from the Most Forgotten Element of Success (2009) by Deborah Norville, p. 65
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). National proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 54.
  • Chi ha fatto il mala, faccia la penitenza.
    • English equivalent: As you make your bed, so you must lie.
    • “You must put up with the unpleasant results of a foolish action or decision.”
  • Chi ha fatto il male, faccia la penitenza.
    • Translation: What you reap is what you sow.
  • Chi ha più giudizio più n’adoperi.
    • Translation: To whom much is entrusted, much is required.
    • English equivalent: Everybody to whom much is given, much is expected.
    • Meaning: “More is expected of those who have received more – that is, those who had good fortune, are naturally gifted, or have been shown special favour.”
  • Chi ha una retta coscienza possiede un regno.
    • English equivalent: His own desire leads every man.
  • Chi he sano e da pie del Sultano.
    • English equivalent: Good health is above wealth.
    • “What shall it profit a man if he gains the whole world-and loses his health?” Dale Carnegie, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948)
  • Chi ha nome, ha robe
    • English equivalent: A good name is the best of all treasures.
  • Chi da giovane ha un vizio, in vecchiaia fa sempre quell’uffizio.
    • Translation: Old habits die hard.
  • Chi dorme non piglia pesci.
    • Translation: Those who sleep don’t catch any fish.
    • English equivalent: Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
    • Meaning: “A lifestyle that involves neither staying up late nor sleeping late is good for body and mind and leads to financial success.”
  • Chi due lepri caccia, l’una non piglia e l’altra lascia.
    • English equivalent: Grasp all, lose all
  • Chi fa da sé, fa per tre.
    • Translation: He who works by himself does the work of three (people).
    • English equivalent: If you want something done right, do it yourself.
    • Note: ironically contradicted by: “L’unione fa la forza” (“Union produces might.”)
  • Chi lascia la via vecchia per la nuova, sa quel che lascia, ma non sa quel che trova.
    • English translation:  Whoever leaves the old way for the new knows what he leaves, but does not know what he finds.
  • Chi mal pensa, mal abbia.
    • English equivalent: Shame take him that shame thinketh.
    • Meaning: Don’t think evil of others since they most likely act the way they do because of situational factors: Never attribute something to malice which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • Chi male comincia, peggio finisce.
    • English equivalent: A bad beginning makes a bad ending.
    • Meaning: “It is as impossible that a system radically erroneous, once commenced, should end well, as it is that a mathematical problem, commenced wrong, should come out right.”
  • Chi non è meco, è contro a meco.
    • English equivalent: He who is not with me is against me.
    • If you want to be respected by others the great thing is to respect yourself. Only by that, only by self-respect will you compel others to respect you.” Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Insulted and the Injured (1861)
    • Originally from the Bible, Luke 11:23 and Matthew 12:30. Specified as a proverb in (Strauss, 1994 p. 974)
  • Chi non fa quando può, non fa quando vuole.
    • English equivalent: He that will not when he may, when he will he may have nay.
    • “Opportunity is like a bald-headed man with only a patch of hair right in front. You have to grab that hair, grasp the opportunity while it’s confronting you, else you’ll be grasping a slick bald head.” Misattributed to Brooker T. Washington This seems to be a paraphrase sumarizing a speech at the Carrie Tuggle Institute, Birmingham, as described in Thinking Black: Some of the Nation’s Best Black Columnists Speak Their Mind (1997) by DeWayne Wickham
  • Chi non può fare come vuole, faccia come può.
    • English equivalent: Do as you may, if you can’t do as you could.
    • “Now you can’t have it you want it!” Mitchell Hurwitz, Arrested Development (2003-2006)
  • Chi non sa obbedir, non sa comandar.
    • Translation: He who has not obeyed, cannot command.
    • English equivalent: Who has not served cannot command.
    • Meaning: One must have been controlled in the same situation one wishes to properly control others.
  • Chi non si lascia consigliare, no si può aiutare.
    • Translation: He who can’t be advised, can also not be helped.
    • English equivalent: He that will not be counseled cannot be helped.
    • “It is always a silly thing to give advice, but to give good advice is absolutely fatal.” The Portrait Of Mr. W. H. (1889), p. 5.
    • Meaning: Advice often contain a genuine warning or an effective suggestion, which is unprudent not to take into consideration.
  • Chi non tura bucolia, tera bucape.
    • English equivalent: A stitch in time saves nine.
    • “No one needs to be told that a vast deal of labor is expended unnecessarily. This is occasioned, to a great extent, by the neglect of seasonable repairs.”
  • Chi mal pensa, mal abbia.
    • English equivalent: Shame take him that shame thinketh.
    • Meaning: Don’t think evil of others since they most likely act the way they do because of situational factors: Never attribute something to malice which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • Chi non ha danari in borsa, abbia miel in bocca.
    • Translation: He who has no money in the purse must have honey in the mouth
    • English equivalent: You can catch more flies with a drop of honey than with a barrel of vinegar.
  • Chi parla assai, falla spesso.
    • English equivalent: Least said, soonest mended.
  • Chi presto denta, presto sdenta.
    • Translation: Those who soon inquire, soon get old.
    • English equivalent: Curiosity killed the cat.
    • Meaning: “Inquisitiveness – or a desire to find about something – can lead you into trouble.”
  • Chi ruba poco, ruba assai.
    • English equivalent: He that steals an egg will steal an ox.
  • Chi ruba una volta è sempre ladro.
    • English equivalent: Once a drunkard always a drunkard; Once a thief always a thief.
  • Chi si loda, si lorda.
    • English equivalent: Don’t blow your own horn.
    • Meaning: Don’t praise yourself.
  • Chi si pasce di speranza, fa la fresca danza
    • English equivalent: He that lives on hope will die fasting.
    • Meaning: “Do not pin all your hopes on something you may not attain, because you could up with end nothing.”
  • Chi sta bene non si muove.
    • English equivalent: ”Better is the enemy of good.”
    • Meaning: The aim for perfection or mastery might slow down progress.
  • Chi sta alle scolte, sente le sue colpe.
    • English equivalent: Eavesdroppers hear no good of themselves.
    • Meaning: “People who eavesdrop on the conversations of others risk hearing unfavorable comments about themselves; used as a warning or reprimand.”
  • Chi tardi arriva, male allogia.
    • English equivalent: The early bird gets the worm.
  • Chi tosto giudica, tosto si pente.
    • Translation: Who judges soon, soon repents.
    • English equivalent: Hasty judgment leads to repentance.
    • Meaning: A quick evaluation is a terrible evaluation.
  • Chi vuol arricchire in un anno, è impiccato in sei mesi.
    • English equivalent: No one gets rich quickly if he is honest.
  • Chi vuol dir mal d’altrui, pensi prima a sè stesso.
    • English equivalent: Everyone should sweep before his own door.
  • Chi vuol gastigar un villano, lo dia a gastigar ad un altro.
    • English equivalent: Set a thief to catch a thief.
  • Chi vuol’ mangiar col diavolo bisogna aver cucchiaio lungo.
    • Translation: He who sups with the devil must use a long spoon.
    • Meaning: Someone who treats others badly will eventually turn on you.
  • Chi vuol pigliare uccelli non deve trar loro dietro randelli.
    • English equivalent: Deal gently with the bird you mean to catch.
    • When people are just, they need friendship in addition. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (c. 325 BC), Book VIII, 1155.a26
  • Chi vuol saldar pinga non la maneggia.
    • English equivalent: It is not wise to open old wounds.
  • Ciò che Dio fa è ben fatto.
    • English equivalent: Each day brings it own bread.
    • Meaning: Try not to worry so much about the future.
  • Ciò che e rimasto ha sapore piu dolce.
    • English equivalent: The sweetest flesh is near the bones.
  • Con la pazienza s’acquista scienza.
    • Translation: With patience you go beyond knowledge.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of patience is worth a pound of brains.
    • Meaning: Patience can often do more than your wits.
  • Con nulla non si fa nulla.
    • English equivalent: From nothing, nothing can come.
    • If you keep doing what you’ve always done, you’ll keep getting what you’ve always gotten. Neil Strauss, The Game (2005).
  • Comprare una gatta nel sacco.
    • English equivalent: Let the buyer have a thousand eyes for the seller wants only one.
    • “I formulate my law, which was wrung out of me after twenty years of wearying defense of science fiction against attacks of people who used the worst examples of the field for ammunition, and whose conclusion was that ninety percent of SF is crud. Using the same standards that categorize 90% of science fiction as trash, crud, or crap, it can be argued that 90% of film, literature, consumer goods, e.tc is crap.” Theodore Sturgeon Venture (1957)
  • Come la cosa indugia, piglia vizio.
    • Translation: As it lingers, so it rakes peril.
    • English equivalent: There is danger in delay.
    • Meaning: “Hesitation or procrastination may lead to trouble or disaster.”
  • Contro i difetti del vicin t’adiri, e gli stessi difetti in te non miri.
    • English equivalent: Forget other faults remembering your own; Forgive and forget.
  • Credi agli anni.
    • English equivalent: Counsel is no command.
    • Meaning: He who gives you advice has not the ambition to control, and does not claim to know better than you; Beware of letting your feelings cloud your judgment.
  • Da chi mi fido, mi guardi Dio, da chi non mi fido guarderò io.
    • Translation: Let God protect me from those I trust, I’ll protect myself from those I don’t.
    • English equivalent: A mans worst enemies are often those of his own house.
  • Da colpa nasce colpa
    • English equivalent: Deep calls to deep.
    • “The more of the context of a problem that a scientist can comprehend, the greater are his chances of finding a truly adequate solution.” Russell L. Ackoff, The development of operations research as a science (1956)
  • Dai cattivi costumi nascono le buone leggi.
    • English equivalent: Good laws have sprung from bad customs.
  • Dal frutto si conosce l’albero.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
  • Dal riso molto conosci lo stolto.
    • English equivalent: A fool is ever laughing.
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). “137”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 102. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6.
  • Dare il diavolo ciò che gli spetta.fe meglio
    • English equivalent: Give the devil his due.
    • “Bad conduct soils the finest ornament more than filth.” Plautus, Mostellaria, I. 3. 133.
  • Di buona volontà sta pieno l’inferno.
    • Translation: The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
  • Dimmi con chi vai, e te dirò chi sei.
    • English equivalent: A man is known by the company he keeps.
  • Dio mi guardi da chi studia un libro solo.
    • English equivalent: Fear the man of one book.
  • Dolor comunicato è subito scemato.
    • English equivalent: A problem shared is a problem halved.
  • Doni di nemici non sono doni.
    • Translation: Gifts of enemies are no gifts.
    • Note: “This advice has its root in the story of the Trojan Horse, the treacherous subterfuge by which the Greeks finally overcame their trojan adversaries at the end of the Trojan War.”
    • English equivalent: Beware of Greeks bearing gifts.
    • Meaning: “Do not trust gifts or favors if they come from an enemy.”
  • Dopo il cattivo, viene il bel tempo.
    • English equivalent: After rain comes sunshine.
  • Du stagione tutto.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes, God disposes.
    • “Plans are insulted destinies. I don’t have plans, I only have goals.” Ash Chandler, Freudian SlipMumbai Mirror Buzz, April 2006.
  • È il tono che fa la musica.
    • English equivalent: It is not what you do, but the way that you do it; Halls don’t grace men, it’s men that grace halls.
    • “Everybody wants something, but they don’t know how to ask for it.” Tony Gayon, Murder by Numbers (2002)
  • È meglio cader dalla finestra che dal tetto.
    • Translation: It’s better to fall from the window than from the roof.
    • English equivalent: Choose the lesser of two evils.
    • Meaning: “If you are forced to choose between two options, both of which are undesirable, all you can do is choose the one that is less undesirable than the other.”
  • È meglio che si dica ‘qui il tale fuggi’ che ‘qui il tale mori’.
    • Translation: It is better to say “here he ran” than “here he died”.
    • English equivalent: He who fights and runs away may live to fight another day.
    • Meaning: “It is wiser to withdraw from a situation that you cannot win than to go on fighting and lose – by a strategic retreat you can return to the battle or argument with renewed energy at a later date.”
  • È meglio un presente che due futuri.
    • Translation: Better one now, than two in the future.
    • English equivalent: One today is worth two tomorrows.
  • È meglio star solo che mal accompagnato.
    • Translation: It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.
    • English equivalent: Better be alone than in bad company.
  • È sempre buono avere due corde per un arco.
    • English equivalent: Good riding at two anchors, men have told, for if the one fails, the other may hold.
  • Egli e mal sordo che non vuol udire.
    • English equivalent: None so deaf as those who will not hear.
  • Egli fa roba sull’ acqua.
    • Translation: He makes things over the water.
    • English equivalent: All is fish that comes to the net.
    • Meaning: Anything that comes along is accepted and turned to advantage.
  • Esperienza, madre di scienza.
    • English equivalent: Experience is the mother of wisdom.
    • “Experience is what you get when you did not get what you wanted.” Randy Pausch, The Last Lecture (2007)
  • Far d’una mosca un elefante.
    • English equivalent: Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 58.
  • Finché c’è vita c’è speranza.
    • Translation: “Where there’s life, there’s hope.”
  • Fare il passo più lungo della gamba.
    • English equivalent: Don’t have too many irons in the fire.
  • Fate quello che dico e non quel che faccio.
    • English equivalent: Preachers say: do as I say, not as i do.
    • Possible interpretation: One should not reprimand those who are younger than himself, when they are merely doing what he does or has done.
  • Fortuna i forti aiuta, e i timidi rifiuta.
    • English equivalent: Fortune favors the bold.
    • Meaning: “Those who act boldly or courageously are most likely to succeed.”
  • Tra il dire e il fare c’è di mezzo il mare.
    • Translation: “An ocean lies between what is said and what is done.”
    • English equivalent: “Easier said than done.”
  • Fuggi il piacer presente, che accena dolor futuro.
    • Translation: Skip the enjoyment that you will regret.
    • English equivalent: Avoid the pleasure which will bite tomorrow.
  • Gettar le margherite si porei.
    • English equivalent: Do not throw pearls before swine.
  • Granata nuova scopa bene tre giorni.
    • English equivalent: New brooms sweep clean.
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
  • Guarda innanzi che tu salti.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap.
    • “The man who thinks before he acts, is most likely to act with discretion, and have no future cause to repent of his conduct; but he who acts blindly, without any foresight, will probably suffer for his rashness.” Trusler, John (1790). Proverbs exemplified, and illustrated by pictures from real life. p. 115.
  • Guardatevi dai falsi profeti.
    • English equivalent: Beware of the false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, and inwardly are ravening wolves.
    • Meaning: The seemingly most respectable people are quite often scoundrels; Evil people often act innocently.
  • I buoni nuotatori al fin si affogano.
    • English equivalent: Good swimmers are often drowned.
  • I fatti son femmine, e le parole maschi.
    • English equivalent: Deeds are fruits, words are but leaves.
    • “It is not so much what you believe in that matters, as the way in which you believe it and proceed to translate that belief into action.” Lin Yutang, The Importance of Living (1937)
  • I fratelli uniti tra loro formano un fascio che pùo resistere agli sforzi più robusti.
    • English equivalent: United we stand, divided we fall; Union is strength.
  • I ladri grandi fanno impiccare i piccolo.
    • English translation:  The big thieves make the little ones hang.
  • I frutti proibiti sono i più dolci.
    • Translation: Forbidden fruit is sweetest.
    • English equivalent: Forbidden fruit is sweet.
    • Meaning: “Things that you must not have or do are always the most desirable.”
  • I pensieri fanno mettere i peli canuti.
    • Translation: Sorrow makes gray hairs before the time.
    • English equivalent: Fretting cares make grey hairs.
    • Meaning: Worrying is a negative activity that can age you prematurely.
  • I primi saranno gli ultimi.
    • English equivalent: The last will be first, and the first last.
    • Meaning: Those who humbly serve the Lord will be rewarded, and those who are arrogant will be humbled.; Humbleness is a virtue, pride is a sin.
  • I topi abbandonano la nave che affonda.
    • English equivalent: Rats desert a sinking ship.
    • Meaning: An organization or leader in trouble will quickly be abandoned.
  • Il bugiardo deve avere buona memoria .
    • English equivalent: A liar should have a good memory.
    • Meaning: “Liars must remember the untruths they have told, to avoid contradicting themselves at some later date.”
  • Il buon sangue giammai non può mentire.
    • English equivalent: Good blood always shows itself.
  • Il dolce far niente.
    • Translation: The sweet do nothing.
    • Reported as “a well known Italian proverb” in Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • Il cane abbaia, ma la carovana passa.
    • Translation: The dogs bark but the caravan passes on.
    • Meaning: Let the world say what it will.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 340. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Il castigo puo differirsi ma si toglie.
    • English equivalent: Punishment is lame but it comes.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 682. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il cuor non spaglia.
    • English equivalent: The heart sees farther than the head.
    • “Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than with the imagination being awake?” Leonardo da Vinci, The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (1938), XIX Philosophical Maxims. 
  • Il denaro è fatto per spendere.
    • Translation: The hidden things of wisdom and a treasure that is not seen, what profit is in them both?
    • English equivalent: Money is there to be spent.
  • Il denaro non fa la felicità.
    • Translation: Wealth does not bring happiness.
    • English equivalent: Wealth rarely brings happiness.
    • Note: Another way to phrase this is by this quote:

“No one – not a single person out of a thousand [elderly interviewed because of their wisdom expertise] – said that to be happy you should try and work as hard as you can to make money to buy the things you want.

No one – not a single person –– said it’s important to be at least as wealthy as the people around you, and if you have more than they do it’s real success.

No one – not a single person –– said you should choose your work based on your desired future earning power.”

  • ‘’Il faut prendre le bénéfice avec les charges.’’
    • English equivalent: Beggars can’t be choosers.
    • We must accept with gratitude and without complaint what we are given when we do not have the means or opportunity to provide ourselves with something better.”
  • Il frutto cade non lontano dall’albero.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
  • Il male vien a cavallo e se ne va a piedi.
    • English equivalent: “Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.”
  • Il meglio ricolga il peggio.
    • English equivalent: Bad is the best choice.
    • “I always search good in bad. l also search bad in good.” Vennu Malesh, It’s My Life (2012)
  • Il mondo è ingrato
    • Translation: Ingratitude is the world’s reward.
  • Il mondo è fatto a scale, chi Ie scende, e chi le sale.
    • English equivalent: Every dog has his day.
  • In bocca chiusa non entrò mai mosca.
    • Translation: Into a closed mouth no flies ever entered.
    • English equivalent: A close mouth catches no flies.
    • Meaning: It is wise not to speak when it is not necessary.
  • In cento anni o cento mesi, l’acqua torna a’ suoi paesi.
    • Translation: In a hundred years or in a hundred months, the water doesn’t come back to it’s source.
    • English equivalent: It will all be the same a hundred years hence.
    • Meaning: So what if you embarrass yourself?
  • In gioventù devi acquistare, quel che in vecchiaia può giovare.
    • English equivalent: Diligent youth makes easy age.
    • Meaning: If you live your youth years diligently, it will save you from regret when you are old. That is, you take care of your health and do things you like that virtually only young people can do.
  • Il più forte ha sempre ragione.
    • English equivalent: Accusing is proving, when malice and force sit judges; The wolf finds a reason for taking the lamb
  • Il piu povero che sia in terra è l’avaro.
    • English equivalent: The covetous man is good to none and worst to himself.
  • Il primo amore non si scorda mai.
    • English equivalent: True love never grows old.
  • Il remedio e peggio del male
    • English equivalent: The remedy is often worse than the disease; Burn not your house to rid it off the mouse.
    • Meaning: The effect of a treatment or bodily enhancement – whether pharmaceutical or not, whether a household remedy or professional-ordained – is often worse than what it was intended to cure or alleviate.
  • Il secondo pensiero è il migliore.
    • English equivalent: Second thoughts are the best.
  • Il serpe tra’ fiori e l’erba giace.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap, for snakes among sweet flowers do creep.
  • Il tuo nemico è quello dell’area tua.
    • Translation: Those are bad dogs who bite their own people.
    • English equivalent: Don’t wash your dirty linen in public; It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest.
    • Meaning: Don’t speak in public of unpleasant private affairs; Don’t speak ill of yourself and the groups you belong to.
  • In casa di calzolaio non si hanno scarpe.
    • Translation: In the house of the shoemaker there are no shoes.
    • English equivalents: Cobblers’ children are worst shod; The shoemaker goes barefoot. The shoemaker’s wife and the smith’s horse have not shoes.
    • Meaning: “Working hard for others one may neglect one’s own needs or the needs of those closest to him.”
  • In terra di ciechi, beato a chi ha un occhio.
    • English equivalent: Among the blind, the one-eyed is king.
    • “People of only limited capability can succeed when surrounded by those who are even less able than themselves.”
  • Intendere è potere.
    • English equivalent: Learning is the eye of the mind.
  • Ipanni rifanno le stanghe.
    • English equivalent: Fine feathers make fine birds.
  • La pigrizia è la chiave della povertà.
    • English equivalent: Poverty is the reward of idleness.
  • L’onestà è la migliore politica.
    • English equivalent: Honesty is the best policy.
    • Meaning: “Being honest or telling the truth is always the wisest course of action.”
  • L’invidia è annessa alla felicità.
    • English translation:  Envy is attached to happiness.
  • L’invidia non morÌ mai.
    • English equivalent: Envy takes no holiday.
  • L’uomo si giudica mal alla cerca.
    • English equivalent: Judge not a man and things at first sight.
    • “No good Book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first.” Thomas Carlyle, Essays, “Novalis” (1829)
  • La galline fanno l’uova dal becco.
    • English equivalent: It’s by the head that the cow gives the milk.
  • La gatta frettolosa ha fatto i gattini ciechi.
    • English equivalent: The hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps.
    • Meaning_ “Things done in haste tend to produce poor results.”
  • La maggior’ sventura o ventura dell’uomo è la moglie.
    • English equivalents: Choose a wife rather by your ear than your eye; A man’s best fortune or his worst is a wife.
  • La lepre mal si prende al suono di tamburo.
    • English equivalent: Drumming is not the way to catch a hare.
    • “When people are just, they need friendship in addition.” Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (c. 325 BC), Book VIII, 1155.a26
  • La maggior’ sventura o ventura dell’uomo è la moglie.
    • English equivalent: A cheerful wife is the spice of life.
  • La miglior difesa è l’attacco.
    • Translation: The best defense is attack.
    • English equivalent: The best defence is a good offence.
    • Meaning: “You are more likely to win if you take the initiative and make an attack rather than preparing to defend yourself.”
  • La pigrizia è la chiave della povertà.
    • English equivalent: Poverty is the reward of idleness.
  • La roba di mal acquisto se la porta il vento.
    • English translation:  The badly bought stuff is carried by the wind.
  • La più lunga strada è la più prossima a casa.
    • English equivalent: The highway is never about.
  • La storia si ripete.
    • English equivalent: Something that has happened once can happen again.
  • La superbia viene davanti alla rovina.
    • Translation: Pride comes before fall.
  • La varietà piace.
    • English equivalent: Variety is the spice of life.
  • La volpe in vicinato non fa mai danno
    • English equivalent: A crafty fox never preys near his den.
  • Loda il mare e tienti alla terra.
    • English equivalent: Praise the sea, but keep on land.
  • Mal comune, mezzo gaudio.
    • English equivalent: “Misery loves company.”
  • Mal si mangia le lepre, se prima non si piglia.
    • English translation: Badly you eat hare, if you don’t take it first.
  • Male prevede chi non provvede.
    • English equivalent: God helps those who help themselves.
  • Medico, cura te stesso!
    • English equivalent: Physician, heal yourself!
    • Meaning: Don’t correct other’s faults; correct your own faults instead.
  • Meglio è tornar indietro, che correr male avanti.
    • Translation: Better to turn back, than to painfully move forward.
    • English equivalent: Better go about than fall into the ditch.
    • Meaning: Cut your losses.
  • Meglio tardi che mai.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • Meaning: “It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all.”
  • Meglio prevedere che provvedere.
    • Translation: It is better to prevent than to cure.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of preventions is better than a pound of cure.
  • Mettere il carro innanzi ai buoi.
    • Translation: To set the cart before the horse.
    • English equivalent: Don’t put the cart before the horse.
    • Meaning: “It is important to do things in the right or natural order.”
  • Molta paglia, poco grano.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Great cry and little wool.
    • Meaning: “Much ado about nothing.”
  • Muove la coda il cane, non per te, ma per il pane.
    • English equivalent: He who acts friendly does not seek your affection, but a specific thing from you.
  • Ne uccide più la gola che la spada.
    • English equivalent: Gluttony kills more than the sword.
  • Neccessità non ha legge.
    • Translation: Necessity knows no law.
    • English equivalent: Necessity has no law..
    • Meaning: It is acceptable to break rules in times of need.
  • Nel dubbio, astieniti.
    • English equivalent: When in doubt, leave it out.
    • Meaning: “If you are unsure what to do, it is best to do nothing at all.”
  • Nella felicità ragione; nell’infelicità pazienza.
    • English equivalent: If fortune favours, beware of being exalted; if fortune thunders, beware of being overwhelmed.
  • Nemico diviso, mezzo vinto.
    • Translation: Enemy divided, half won.
    • English equivalent: Divide and conquer.
    • Meaning: “The best way to conquer or control a group of people is by encouraging them to fight among themselves rather than allowing them to unite in opposition to the ruling authority.”
  • Nessun sente da che parte preme la scarpa, se non chi se la calza.
    • English equivalent: Needs must when the devil drives.
    • Meaning: It is acceptable to break rules in times of need.
  • Nessun sente da che parte preme la scarpa, se non chi se la calza.
    • English equivalent: No one knows where the shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
  • Nessuno è indispensable.
    • English equivalent: No man is indispensable.
  • Niente di nuovo sotto il sole.
    • English equivalent: Nothing is new.
    • Meaning: Absolutely everything has been done before.
  • La notte è la madre dei pensieri.
    • Night is the mother of thoughts.
    • English equivalent: Take counsel of one’s pillow.
    • Note: Specified as an Italian proverb in the source.
  • Non bisogna fare le cose a metà.
    • English equivalent: If a job is worth doing, it’s worth doing well.
  • Non bisogna puntare tutto sulla stessa carta.
    • English equivalent: “Don’t put all your eggs in the same basket.”
  • Non c’è avere che voglia sapere.
    • English equivalent: ”A good mind possess a kingdom.”
    • Meaning: Material assets are fleeting, but intellectual assets will basically stay with you for the rest of your life. Therefore, intellectual assets are much more worth than material ones.
  • Non c’è due senza tre.
    • English equivalent: All good things are three.
  • Non dare consigli a chi non li chiede.
    • English equivalent: Give neither salt nor counsel till you are asked for it.
  • Non doe seguir amor chi non ha valore.
    • English equivalent: Faint heart never won fair lady.
    • Meaning: “It is necessary to be bold and courageous to win the heart of a woman – or to achieve any other cherished objective.”
  • Non fu mai gloria senza invidia.
    • English equivalent: Envy always shooteth at a high mark.
  • Non ha il dolce a caro, chi provato non ha l’amaro.
    • Translation: To taste the sweet, you must taste the bitter.
    • English equivalent: No pain, no gain; Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
    • Meaning: Where there is no adversity of some sort there is seldom anything to win; No or little adversity is a sign that fortune has forgotten you.
  • Non ricordar il capestro, in casa dell’impiccato.
    • Translation: In the house of the hanged man, mention not the rope.
    • English equivalent: Name not a rope in his house who hanged himself.
  • Non si dice mai tanto una cosa che non sia qualche cosa
    • English equivalent: “The voice of the people is the voice of god.”
  • Non si è mai troppo prudenti.
    • English equivalent: Better safe than sorry.
    • Meaning: Things that has happened will happen again. Religious myths for example, which are allegorical, will per definition reoccur.
  • Non perché grigio il lupo è bastanato, ma perché la pecora ma ha sbranato.
    • English equivalent: The sin is not in the sinning, but in the being found out.
  • Non si è mai troppo prudenti.
    • Translation: One can never be too careful.
  • Non si puo fare stringhe della propria pelle.
    • English equivalent: Don’t burn the candles at both ends.
    • Meaning: Don’t wake up early in the morning and stay up late into the evening as well.
  • Non si può cavar sangue dalla rapa.
    • English equivalent: You can’t milk a bull.
  • Non si serra mai una porta che non se n’apra un’altra.
    • English equivalent: When one door closes another opens.
    • Meaning: “When baffled in one direction a man of energy will not despair, but will find another way to his object.”
  • Non si può aver il miele senza la pecchie.
    • English equivalent: Honey is sweet, but the bees sting.
  • Non si tosto si fa un tempio a Dio come il diavolo ci fabrica una capella appresso.
    • English equivalent: Where god has a church the devil will have his chapel.
    • “Very seldom does any good thing arise but there comes an ugly phantom of a caricature of it.”
  • Non tutte le ciambelle riescono col buco.
    • English equivalent: Not all truths are proper to be told.
  • Non v’ha libro sí cattivo che non abbia qualcosa di buono.
    • English equivalent: No book was so bad, but some good might be got out of it.
  • ‘’Nu mesura pe altii cu palma ta.’’
    • English equivalent: Do not judge others by your own yardstick.
    • “l often went fishing up in Maine during the summer. Personally I am very fond of strawberries and cream, but I have found that for some strange reason fish prefer worms.” Dale Carnegie, How to win friends and influence people (1933)
  • Nutritura passa natura.
    • English equivalent: Nature is beyond all teaching.
  • Odi, veti et tace, se voi vivir in pace.
    • English equivalent: Keep your mouth shut and your ears open.
  • Ofele, fa el to meste!.
    • English equivalent: A blind man should not judge of colours.
    • “An uneducated man cannot judge of the attainments of the learned.”
  • Oggi a me, domani a te.
    • Translation: Today for me, and tomorrow for you.
    • English equivalent: Today me, tomorrow thee.
  • Ogni cosa ha cagione.
    • Translation: Everything has a reason.
    • English equivalent: Every why has a wherefore.
    • Meaning: “Everything has an underlying reason.”
  • Ogni cuffia è buone por Ie natte.
    • English equivalent: At night all cats are grey.
  • Ogni cosa si compra a prezzo.
    • Translation: Everything you buy at the price.
    • English equivalent: You don’t get anything for nothing.
    • Meaning: “Everything has to be paid for, directly or indirectly, in money or in kind.”
  • Ogni paese al valent’uomo è patria.
    • English equivalent: Great minds agree.
  • Ogni regola ha la sua eccezione.
    • Translation: No rules without exceptions.
    • English equivalent: There is no rule without an exception.
  • Ogni verità non è a dire.
    • English equivalent: All truths are not to be told.
  • Ognun si pari le mosche con la sua coda.
    • English equivalent: Every bird must hatch its own eggs.
    • Meaning: We must depend on ourselves: financially and otherwhise.
  • Oro è che oro vale.
    • English equivalent: Everything is worth its price.
  • Pazzo chi perde il volo per lo sbalzo.
    • English equivalent: One must step back to take a good leap.
    • “Information processing keeps going on even when we are not aware of it, even while we are asleep.”
  • Per gnente l’orbo no canta.
    • English equivalent: You can’t get something for nothing.
  • Perdere il trotto per l’ambiadura.
    • English equivalent: Don’t kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.
  • Paese che vai, usanze che trovi.
    • English equivalent: When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
  • Più grande la compagnia, più ci si diverte.
    • English equivalent: The more the merrier.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1094. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Poeta si nasce, oratore si diventa.
    • English equivalent: Poets are born, but orators are trained.
  • Presto matura, presto marcio.
    • English equivalent: Early ripe, early rotten.
  • Prudenza è madre di sicurezza.
    • English equivalent: Caution is the parent of safety.
  • Ride bene chi ride ultimo.
    • English equivalent: He who laughs last, laughs longest.
    • Meaning: “Minor successes or failures along the way are of no significance – the person who is ultimately triumphant is the only real winner.”
  • Quale il padre tale il figlio.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
  • Quand’un è per terra, ognun grida: dagli, dagli!.
    • English equivalent: Don’t hit a man when he is down.
  • Quando l’amico chiede, non v’è domani.
    • Translation: When a friend asks, there is no tomorrow.
    • English equivalent: When thy friend asks, let there be no to-morrow.
  • Quando la testa duole tutte le membra languono.
    • Translation: When the head aches all the members languish.
    • English equivalent: When the head is sick, the whole body is sick.
  • Quando tutti dicono ubriaco, va’ a dormire (letto).
    • English equivalent: When all men say you are an ass it is time to bray.
    • “I think any man in business would be foolish to fool around with his secretary. If it’s somebody else’s secretary, fine!”
    • Attributed to Barry Goldwater in: Conference Board (1978) Across the board. Vol. 15. p. 74.
  • Quel che ciondola non cade.
    • Translation: All that dangles does not fall.
    • English equivalent: All is not lost that is in danger.
    • Meaning: Alltough your undertaking is in peril, it does not necessarily mean you are failing.
  • Quel che ciondola, non cade.
    • English equivalent: Bitter pills may have blessed effects.
    • “Present afflictions may tend to our future good.”
  • Quel che pare burla, ben sovente è vero.
    • English equivalent: Many a true words are spoken in jest.
    • “A joke’s a very serious thing.” Charles Churchill, The Ghost (1763), book iv, line 1386
  • Scusa non richiesta, accusa manifesta.
    • English equivalent: A guilty conscience needs no accuser.
    • Meaning: “People who know they have done wrong reveal their guilt by the things they say or the way they interpret what other people say.”
  • Se la montagna non va da Maometto, Maometto viene alla montagna.
    • Translation: If the mountain won’t come to Mohammed, Mohammed must come to the mountain.
    • English equivalent: If the mountain will not come to Mohammed, Mohammed must go to the mountain.
    • Meaning: “If you cannot get what you want, you must adapt yourself to the circumstances or adopt a different approach.”
  • Se piovesse maccheroni, che bel tempo pei ghiottoni.
    • English equivalent: If the sky falls, we shall catch larks.
    • “Life is far too important to be taken seriously.”
    • Originally “Life is far too important a thing ever to talk seriously about it.” Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere’s Fan (1892)
    • Divers Proverbs with Their Explication & Illustration, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
  • Se vende i suoi figli per il formaggio non puo riaverli dopo aver mangiato la pizza.
    • Translation: If you sell your children for cheese, you can’t get them back after you’ve eaten the pizza.
    • English equivalent: What is done, is done.
  • Secondo la misura che farai, misurator ancor sarai.
    • English equivalent: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
  • Secondo la paga, il lavoro.
    • Translation: What pay, such work.
    • English equivalent: You get what you pay for.
  • Senza tentazioni, senza onore.
    • Translation: Where there is no temptation there is no glory.
    • English equivalent: Without temptation there is no victory.
    • Meaning: Not being tempted is a sign that fortune has forgotten you.
  • Si dice sempre il lupo più grande che non è.
    • Translation: The wolf is made bigger than it is.
    • English equivalent: A story never loses in the telling.
    • Meaning: Lying a little might make the story better.
  • Si mira piu dell’affetto che all’effetto.
    • Translation: The aim is more to the effect of affection.
    • English equivalent: Take the will for the deed.
    • Meaning: Look at the well intended effort, and not its effects.
  • Spazzatoio nuovo spazza ben la casa. (Italian)
    • Translation: A new broom sweeps well the house.
    • English equivalent: A new broome sweepeth cleane.
    • Meaning: “We should never use an old tool when the extra labor in consequence costs more than a new one. Thousands wear out their lives and waste their time merely by the use of dull and unsuitable instruments.”
    • Alternate meaning: “We often apply it to exchanges among servants, clerks, or any persons employed, whose service, at first, in any new place, is very good, both efficient and faithful; but very soon, when all the new circumstances have lost their novelty, and all their curiosity has ceased, they naturally fall into their former and habitual slackness.”
    • Source for meaning: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order …. Munroe and Company. p. 38.
  • Tal madre, tal figlia .
    • Translation: Such mother, such daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and rarely.
  • Tal mano si bacia che si vorrebbe veder tagliata.
    • English equivalent: Many kiss the hand they wish to cut off.
  • Tal sonata, tal ballata.
    • English equivalent: Just as one calls into the forest, so it echoes back.
    • Meaning: Do not expect friendly reply when being obnoxious.
    • Meaning: Bad language may have other causes than innate bad character.
  • Tra/fra moglie e marito non ci mettere il dito.
    • Translation: Between wife and husband don’t put a finger.
    • English equivalent: Don’t go between the tree and the bark.
  • Tutto è bene quel che riesce bene.
    • English equivalent: All is well that ends well.
    • “Problems and misfortunes along the way can be forgotten as long as the end is satisfactory.”
  • Tutte le strade conducono a Roma.
    • English equivalent: All roads lead to Rome.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 10.
  • Un nemico è troppo o cento amici non bastano.
    • English equivalent: Do not think that one enemy is insignificant, or that a thousand friends are too many.
  • Uno semina, l’altro raccoglie.
    • English equivalent: One sows, the other reaps
  • Uomo avvisato è mezzo salvato.
    • English equivalent: Forewarned, forearmed.
  • Val meglio essere matti in compagnia che savi da soli.
    • English equivalent: Better foolish by all than wise by yourself.
    • Emanuel Strauss. “70”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs.
  • Val più un cattivo accordo che una buona causa legale.
    • English equivalent: A bad compromise is better than a good lawsuit.

Italian Proverbs

  • A ogni uccello il suo nido è bello.
    • Literally: To every bird its nest is beautiful.
    • Meaning: In English, the nearest meaning of this phrase is: “There’s no place like home” – Dorothy’s mantra in The Wizard of Oz. The literal translation from the Italian, however, is rather more poetic: “To every bird, his own nest is beautiful”.
  • Acqua passata non macina più.
    • Literally: Past water no longer grinds.
    • Meaning: “It’s water under the bridge” you might say, to indicate that something’s firmly in the past. The Italian version is a bit more complicated: “Water that’s flowed past the mill grinds no more” – in other words, it no longer does a thing.
  • O mangiar questa minestra o saltar questa finestra.
    • Literally: Either eat this soup or jump out of this window.
    • Meaning: This is the Italian way of saying “Take it or leave it”. it’s a threat that anyone who’s been served dinner by an Italian nonna might be able to imagine hearing. 
  • La gatta frettolosa ha fatto i gattini ciechi.
    • Literally: The hasty cat gave birth to blind kittens.
    • Meaning: Perhaps not the nicest way of saying that things done too quickly tend to turn out badly. An English equivalent might be “Haste makes waste”.
  • Tanto va la gatta al lardo che ci lascia lo zampino. 
    • Literally: So much the cat lard that leaves us the paw.
    • Meaning: What is it about Italians and cats? This particular pearl of wisdom translates literally as: “The cat goes so often to the bacon that she loses her paw”. In other words, if you keep on doing the same bad thing over and over again, you’ll get caught.
  • Far d’una mosca un elefante.
    • Literally: Make an elephant fly.
    • Meaning: If someone tells you: “Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill” – what he means is that you shouldn’t make a big deal out of a small matter. In Italian, the expression is: “To make an elephant out of a fly”.
  • Menare il can per l’aia. 
    • Literally: Lead the can in the farmyard.
    • Meaning: More animals. Italians who say that you’re “leading the dog around the barnyard” are basically telling you not to beat around the bush.
  • Oggi in figura, domani in sepoltura.
    • Literally: Today in the picture, tomorrow in burial.
    • Meaning: We all know the English saying: “Here today, gone tomorrow”. Italians, however, are far more explicit: “Today in person, tomorrow in the grave”.
  • A chi dai il dito si prende anche il braccio. 
    • Literally: Who you give the finger to also takes the arm.
    • Meaning: “Give him an inch and he’ll take a mile” is a familiar expression used for a person who’s been given something, and then tries to get a whole lot more. In Italy, this kind of thing is viewed rather more personally: “Give them a finger and they’ll take an arm.”
  • L’abito non fa il monaco. 
    • Literally: The dress does not make the priest.
    • Meaning: As you might expect, even Italian proverbs aren’t immune from the influence of the Catholic Church . So, while English speakers say: “Clothes don’t make the man,” Italians claim that “The habit doesn’t make the monk”.
  • Neanche il cane muove la coda per niente.
    • Literally: Not even the dog moves its tail at all.
    • Meaning: Not to worry, dogs get a look-in too. “Not even a dog wags its tail for nothing”, Italians say, or as we’d put it: “There’s no such thing as a free lunch”. 
  • Non tutte le ciambelle riescono col buco.
    • Literally: Not all doughnuts come out with a hole.
    • Meaning: A stoic Italian might tell you: i.e., things don’t always turn out as planned.
  • Chi va al mulino si infarina.
    • Literally: Those who go to the mill get floury.
    • Meaning: There’s no exact English equivalent for this phrase, but it expresses the idea that you can’t expect to get involved in risky business without getting your hands dirty: “Those who go to the mill get covered in flour”.
  • La mamma dei cretini è sempre incinta.
    • Literally: The mother of fools is always pregnant
    • Meaning: Italians say when they think someone’s a prize idiot. It’s the same idea behind the English expression “There’s one born every minute”, though while we tend to reserve that saying for dupes, the Italian equivalent applies to stupidity of all stripes.
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