Portuguese Proverbs

Portuguese people are a Romance  ethnic group indigenous to Portugal who share a common Portuguese culture, ancestry and language. Their predominant religion is Christianity, mainly Roman Catholicism, though large segments of the population, especially the younger generations, have no religious affiliation. The Portuguese people’s heritage largely derives from the pre-Celts (Lusitanians) and Celts (Gallaecians, Turduli and Celtici), who were Romanized after the conquest of the region by the ancient Romans. A number of Portuguese can also trace minor descent from Germanic tribes who arrived after the Roman period as ruling elites, including the Suebi, Vandals, and Visigoths, in northern Portugal and central Portugal. Finally, the Moorish occupation left traces of Jewish and North African (Arab-Berber) genetic influence in the western and southern areas of the Iberian Peninsula.

A collection of Portuguese Proverbs to inspire you. Wise Portuguese Sayings in the form of proverbs that have been passed down for generations. Proverbs from all Portuguese speaking countries. 

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Good Morning
My love
I miss you
Good afternoon – Good evening

“What is marriage, mother?” Child;
It is spinning, having children, making money, and weeping. – Portuguese Proverb

A bad knife cuts one’s finger instead of the stick. – Portuguese Proverb

A bad neighbor will give you a needle with no thread. – Portuguese Proverb

A barking dog was never a good hunter. – Portuguese Proverb

A barley corn is better than a diamond to a cock. – Portuguese Proverb

A beard lathered is half shaved. – Portuguese Proverb

A beard once washed is half shaven. – Portuguese Proverb

A beggar’s wallet is never full. – Portuguese Proverb

A bird in the hand is more worth than two flying. – Portuguese Proverb

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. – Portuguese Proverb

A body that is well made needs no cloak. – Portuguese Proverb

A bustling mother makes a slothful daughter. – Portuguese Proverb

A busy mother makes slothful daughters. – Portuguese Proverb

A capon eight months old is fit for a king’s table. – Portuguese Proverb

A cat that has been scalded is afraid of cold water. – Portuguese Proverb

A cat that is hidden with its tail showing. – Portuguese Proverb

A cat that is hidden with its tail showing. – Portuguese Proverb

A contented ass enjoys a long life. – Portuguese Proverb

A dead man does not speak. – Portuguese Proverb

A dog bitten by a snake is afraid of sausages. – Portuguese Proverb

A dog in the manger, that neither eats nor lets others eat. – Portuguese Proverb

A dog that barks much is never a good hunter. – Portuguese Proverb

A dog that has been bitten by a snake, fears the sausage. – Portuguese Proverb

A donkey’s cries don’t reach heaven. – Portuguese Proverb

A drunk’s ass has no master. – Portuguese Proverb

A dull ass near home trots without the stick. – Portuguese Proverb

A fair-weather friend changes with the wind. – Portuguese Proverb

A fast horse does not want the spur. – Portuguese Proverb

A fault confessed is half forgiven. – Portuguese Proverb

A fault confessed is half redressed. – Portuguese Proverb

A finger’s length in a sword, and a palm in a lance, are a great advantage. – Portuguese Proverb

A fly doesn’t enter in a closed mouth. – Portuguese Proverb

A friend is to be taken with his faults. – Portuguese Proverb

A friend’s fault should be known but not abhorred. – Portuguese Proverb

A full man is no eater. – Portuguese Proverb

A girl, a vineyard and a bean field are difficult to guard. – Portuguese Proverb

A girl, a vineyard, an orchard, and a bean-field, are hard to watch. – Portuguese Proverb

A good cock was never fat. – Portuguese Proverb

A good thing is known when it is lost. – Portuguese Proverb

A good thing is soon caught up. – Portuguese Proverb

A good woman should be plump as a hen, with eyes dark as the midnight sky, and a disposition as fiery as pepper. – Portuguese Proverb

A good word quenches more than a cauldron of water. – Portuguese Proverb

A good year is determined by its spring. – Portuguese Proverb

A goose cannot graze after him. – Portuguese Proverb

A goose, a woman, and a goat, are bad things lean. – Portuguese Proverb

A gossiping woman talks of everybody, and everybody of her. – Portuguese Proverb

A great thrust of a lance at a dead Moor. – Portuguese Proverb

A guest and a fish stink in three days. – Portuguese Proverb

A handsome hostess is bad for the purse. – Portuguese Proverb

A house without a dog or a cat is the house of a scoundrel. – Portuguese Proverb

A house without either a cat or a dog is the house of a scoundrel. – Portuguese Proverb

A hungry belly hears nobody. – Portuguese Proverb

A hungry wolf is not at rest. – Portuguese Proverb

A liar is sooner caught than a cripple. – Portuguese Proverb

A lie has short legs. – Portuguese Proverb

A life of leisure, and a life of laziness, are two things. – Portuguese Proverb

A little gall spoils much honey. – Portuguese Proverb

A little injury dismays, and a great one stills. – Portuguese Proverb

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. – Portuguese Proverb

A little leak will sink a great ship. – Portuguese Proverb

A little makes a debtor and much an enemy. – Portuguese Proverb

A long tongue betokens a short hand. – Portuguese Proverb

A looker on sees more of the game than a player. – Portuguese Proverb

A loss not missed by your neighbor is not a real loss. – Portuguese Proverb

A man of straw is better than a woman of gold. – Portuguese Proverb

A morsel eaten gains no friend. – Portuguese Proverb

A much prayed for defunct goes straight to hell. – Portuguese Proverb

A pig on credit makes a good winter and a bad spring. – Portuguese Proverb

A poor man is hungry after eating. – Portuguese Proverb

A ragged colt may make a handsome horse. – Portuguese Proverb

A rash man, a skin of good wine, and a glass vessel, do not last long. – Portuguese Proverb

A resolute heart endures no counsel. – Portuguese Proverb

A rich widow weeps in one eye and laughs with the other. – Portuguese Proverb

A rich widow weeps with one eye and signals with the other. – Portuguese Proverb

A scalded cat dreads cold water. – Portuguese Proverb

A scalded cat fears cold water. – Portuguese Proverb

A seat in the council is honour without profit. – Portuguese Proverb

A servant and a cock must be kept but one year. – Portuguese Proverb

A sharp tooth for hard bread. – Portuguese Proverb

A shut mouth keeps me out of strife. – Portuguese Proverb

A small hatchet fells a great oak. – Portuguese Proverb

A small pack becomes a small peddler. – Portuguese Proverb

A small spark makes a great fire. – Portuguese Proverb

A small tear relieves a great sorrow. – Portuguese Proverb

A stout heart breaks ill fortune. – Portuguese Proverb

A tongue of honey, a heart of gall. – Portuguese Proverb

A well-formed figure needs no cloak. – Portuguese Proverb

A woman and a hen are soon lost through gadding. – Portuguese Proverb

A woman with two husbands cheats both. – Portuguese Proverb

A word and a blow. – Portuguese Proverb

A word and a stone once let go cannot be recalled. – Portuguese Proverb

A word from the mouth, a stone from the hand. – Portuguese Proverb

A word to the wise is enough. – Portuguese Proverb

A word to the wise. – Portuguese Proverb

After shaving there is nothing to shear. – Portuguese Proverb

After the storm comes the easiness. – Portuguese Proverb

After the storm comes the good weather. – Portuguese Proverb

Alas for the son whose father went to heaven. – Portuguese Proverb

All are not soldiers who go to the wars. – Portuguese Proverb

All bite the bitten dog. – Portuguese Proverb

All is not gold that glitters. – Portuguese Proverb

All that glitters is not gold. – Portuguese Proverb

All the wool is hair, more or less. – Portuguese Proverb

All the world loves a lover. – Portuguese Proverb

All the world will beat the man whom fortune buffets. – Portuguese Proverb

An abyss calls another. – Portuguese Proverb

An angry man heeds no counsel. – Portuguese Proverb

An empty purse and a new house make a man wise, but too late. – Portuguese Proverb

An empty purse frights away friends. – Portuguese Proverb

An empty purse, and a finished house, make a man wise, but too late. – Portuguese Proverb

An estate inherited is the less valued. – Portuguese Proverb

An healthy mind for an healthy body. – Portuguese Proverb

An honest man’s word is as good as the king’s. – Portuguese Proverb

An hour of play discovers more than a year of conversation (does). – Portuguese Proverb

An hour of play discovers more than a year of conversation does. – Portuguese Proverb

An hour of play discovers more than a year of conversation. – Portuguese Proverb

An innocent heart suspects no guile. – Portuguese Proverb

An old man in love is like a flower in winter. – Portuguese Proverb

An old monkey will not stick his hand into a jar. – Portuguese Proverb

An open box tempts an honest man. – Portuguese Proverb

An open countenance often conceals close thoughts. – Portuguese Proverb

Another man’s trade costs money. – Portuguese Proverb

Another’s bread costs dear. – Portuguese Proverb

Another’s misfortune does not cure my pain. – Portuguese Proverb

Appearances are deceiving. – Portuguese Proverb

As the king lives, so live his vassals. – Portuguese Proverb

As they pipe to me, I will dance. – Portuguese Proverb

At night all cats are brown. – Portuguese Proverb

At night all cats are grey. – Portuguese Proverb

Basketeer who makes a basket makes a hundred if he’s given line and time. – Portuguese Proverb

Baskets after the vintage. – Portuguese Proverb

Be sure not to owe anything to the rich, and don’t lend anything to the poor. – Portuguese Proverb

Beauty is a good letter of introduction. – Portuguese Proverb

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. – Portuguese Proverb

Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder. – Portuguese Proverb

Before you marry consider what you do. – Portuguese Proverb

Before you marry reflect, for it is a knot you cannot untie. – Portuguese Proverb

Before you marry, watch what you do. – Portuguese Proverb

Better a distant good than a near evil. – Portuguese Proverb

Better a red face than a black heart. – Portuguese Proverb

Better a sparrow in the hand than two flying. – Portuguese Proverb

Better alone than in bad company. – Portuguese Proverb

Better an ass that carries me than a horse that throws me. – Portuguese Proverb

Better an egg in peace, than an ox in war. – Portuguese Proverb

Better anticipate than be anticipated. – Portuguese Proverb

Better be killed by robbers than by the kick of an ass. – Portuguese Proverb

Better be one-eyed than quite blind. – Portuguese Proverb

Better be out of the world than out of the fashion. – Portuguese Proverb

Better be silent than speak ill. – Portuguese Proverb

Better be wrong with the many than right with the few. – Portuguese Proverb

Better bend than break. – Portuguese Proverb

Better deserve honour and not have it, than have it and not deserve it. – Portuguese Proverb

Better droping than dry. – Portuguese Proverb

Better gain in mud than lose in gold. – Portuguese Proverb

Better go round than be drowned. – Portuguese Proverb

Better have a bad ass than be your own ass. – Portuguese Proverb

Better have friends in the market-place than money in your coffer. – Portuguese Proverb

Better have to give than have to beg. – Portuguese Proverb

Better is a leap over the ditch than the entreaties of good men. – Portuguese Proverb

Better is my neighbour’s hen than mine. – Portuguese Proverb

Better is one “Take this,” than two “I-will-give-you.” – Portuguese Proverb

Better just repair the gutter than the whole house. – Portuguese Proverb

Better keep, than have to beg. – Portuguese Proverb

Better late than never. – Portuguese Proverb

Better lose that lose more. – Portuguese Proverb

Better mine than ours. – Portuguese Proverb

Better preventing than fixing. – Portuguese Proverb

Better repair the gutter than the whole house. – Portuguese Proverb

Better straw, than nothing. – Portuguese Proverb

Better to be queen for an hour than a countess for life. – Portuguese Proverb

Better to have friends in the marketplace than money in your coffers. – Portuguese Proverb

Better wrong with the many than right with the few. – Portuguese Proverb

Between husband and wife, one doesn’t put the spoon. – Portuguese Proverb

Between smith and smith no money passes. – Portuguese Proverb

Between the beginning and the end there is always a middle. – Brasil 

Between the hand and the lip the morsel may slip. – Portuguese Proverb

Between the hand and the mouth the soup is lost. – Portuguese Proverb

Beware of a bad woman, and put no trust in a good one. – Portuguese Proverb

Beware of a door that has many keys. – Portuguese Proverb

Beware of a man that does not talk and a dog that does not bark. – Portuguese Proverb

Beware of a man that does not talk, and of a dog that does not bark. – Portuguese Proverb

Beware of a pledge that eats. – Portuguese Proverb

Beware of silent dogs and still waters. – Portuguese Proverb

Beware of the dog that does not bark. – Portuguese Proverb

Beware of the door with too many keys. – Portuguese Proverb

Big fish are fished in big rivers. – Portuguese Proverb

Big walks, big lies. – Portuguese Proverb

Birds of prey do not flock together. – Portuguese Proverb

Bite the biter. – Portuguese Proverb

Bleed him, purge him, and if he dies, bury him. – Portuguese Proverb

Blessed are the dead that the rain rains on. – Portuguese Proverb

Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. – Portuguese Proverb

Brackish water is sweet in a drought. – Portuguese Proverb

Brag is a good dog, but Holdfast is better. – Portuguese Proverb

Broken friendship may be soldered but can never be made sound. – Portuguese Proverb

Buy your greyhound, don’t rear him. – Portuguese Proverb

By going gains the mill, and not by standing still. – Portuguese Proverb

By its fruits one knows the tree. – Portuguese Proverb

Chairs sink and stools rise. – Portuguese Proverb

Change yourself, and fortune will change with you. – Portuguese Proverb

Change yourself, and your luck will change. – Portuguese Proverb

Change yourself, change your fortunes. – Portuguese Proverb

Change yourself; change your fortunes. – Portuguese Proverb

Chastise the good man, he will grow better; chastise the bad, and he will grow worse. – Portuguese Proverb

Cheat me in the price and not in the goods. – Portuguese Proverb

Children married, cares increased. – Portuguese Proverb

Children pick up words, as pigeons peas, And utter them again as God shall please. – Portuguese Proverb

Children raised, doubled work. – Portuguese Proverb

Children should be seen and not heard. – Portuguese Proverb

Children tell in the highway what they hear by the fireside. – Portuguese Proverb

Children: one is one, two is fun, three is a houseful. – Portuguese Proverb

Choleric men are blind and mad. – Portuguese Proverb

Cobblers go to mass and pray that the cows may die (i.e., for the sake of their hides). – Portuguese Proverb

Conceal not your secret from your friend, or you deserve to lose him. – Portuguese Proverb

Concealed goodness is a sort of vice. – Portuguese Proverb

Confess and be hanged. – Portuguese Proverb

Counterfeit coin passes current at night. – Portuguese Proverb

Crime doesn’t pay. – Portuguese Proverb

Crows do not peck out crow’s eyes. – Portuguese Proverb

Dead men tell no tales. – Portuguese Proverb

Dear is cheap, and cheap is dear. – Portuguese Proverb

Death makes us equal in the grave but not in eternity. – Portuguese Proverb

Death spares neither Pope nor beggar. – Portuguese Proverb

Death squares all accounts. – Portuguese Proverb

Deeds are love, and not sweet words. – Portuguese Proverb

Despise your enemy and you will soon be beaten. – Portuguese Proverb

Destroy the lion while he is but a whelp. – Portuguese Proverb

Dirty clothes one washes at home. – Portuguese Proverb

Divide to conquer. – Portuguese Proverb

Do as I say, not as I do. – Portuguese Proverb

Do good, and care not to whom. – Portuguese Proverb

Do ill, and expect the like. – Portuguese Proverb

Do not count your chickens before they hatched. – Portuguese Proverb

Do not look a gift horse in the mouth. – Portuguese Proverb

Do not put off for tomorrow what you can do today. – Portuguese Proverb

Do not put the cart before the horse. – Portuguese Proverb

Do not rear a bird of a bad breed. – Portuguese Proverb

Do not tell all that you know, don’t believe all you hear, and don’t do all that you can. – Portuguese Proverb

Dog that barks doesn’t bite. – Portuguese Proverb

Don?t quit the highway for a short cut. – Portuguese Proverb

Don?t undress a saint to dress the other. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t be a baker if your head is made of butter. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t cry over spilt milk. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t leave for tomorrow what you can do today. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t leave the high road for a short cut. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t leave the main road for a shortcut. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t let the bastards grind you down. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t let the cat out of the bag. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t let your sorrow come higher than your knees. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t make yourself poor to one who won’t make you rich. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t pull hard enough to break the rope. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t put all you eggs in one basket. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t put the cart before the oxen. – Portuguese Proverb

Don’t undress a saint to dress the other. – Portuguese Proverb

Drink nothing without seeing it, sign nothing without reading it. – Portuguese Proverb

During war, weapons aren’t cleaned. – Portuguese Proverb

Each head its sentence. – Portuguese Proverb

Each head, a different judgement. – Portuguese Proverb

Each monkey on its branch. – Portuguese Proverb

Each monkey on its own branch. – Portuguese Proverb

Each one in his profession. – Portuguese Proverb

Each one takes his own decisions. – Portuguese Proverb

Each one takes his/her own decisions. – Portuguese Proverb

Each one to his owner. – Portuguese Proverb

Each one with his peer. – Portuguese Proverb

Early sleep and early wake up, gives health and makes you grow. – Portuguese Proverb

Eat of your own, and call yourself mine. – Portuguese Proverb

Eat the wind and swallow bitterness. – Portuguese Proverb

Eat to live, not live to eat. – Portuguese Proverb

Eat with him, and beware of him. – Portuguese Proverb

Enjoy every moment because life is short. – Portuguese Proverb

Erring is human, forgiving is divine. – Portuguese Proverb

Even the most beautiful sheets have small flaws. – Portuguese Proverb

Every  land to its own custom, every wheel its own spindle. – Portuguese Proverb

Every ant has its ire. – Portuguese Proverb

Every cask smells of the wine it contains. – Portuguese Proverb

Every cloud has a silver lining. – Portuguese Proverb

Every cock is valiant on his own dunghill. – Portuguese Proverb

Every cock will crow upon his own dunghill. – Portuguese Proverb

Every fly has its shadow. – Portuguese Proverb

Every hair casts its shadow. – Portuguese Proverb

Every land to its own custom, every wheel its own spindle. – Portuguese Proverb

Every man for himself and God for all. – Portuguese Proverb

every man look to the bread upon which he must depend. – Portuguese Proverb

Every man to his trade. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one for himself, and God for us all. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one is a king in his own house. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one is wise for his own profit. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one knows best where the shoe pinches him. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one reaps as he sows. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one sings as he has the gift, and marries as he has the luck. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one speaks as he is. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one speaks of the feast as he finds it. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one stretches his legs according to the length of his coverlet. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one to his equal. – Portuguese Proverb

Every one to his liking. – Portuguese Proverb

Every peddler praises his own needles. – Portuguese Proverb

Every peddler praises his own needles. – Portuguese Proverb

Every peddler speaks highly about his own needles. – Portuguese Proverb

Every pedlar praises his own needles. – Portuguese Proverb

Every pig has it Martinmas. – Portuguese Proverb

Everybody’s friend or nobody’s friend, is all one. – Portuguese Proverb

Everyone for himself, and God for us all. – Portuguese Proverb

Everything has its time. – Portuguese Proverb

Everything must have a beginning. – Portuguese Proverb

Faintheart is always in danger. – Portuguese Proverb

Fair and softly goes far in a day. – Portuguese Proverb

Fair feathers make fair fowls. – Portuguese Proverb

Fair flowers do not remain long by the wayside. – Portuguese Proverb

Faith has no eyes; he who asks to see has no faith. – Portuguese Proverb

Far from the eyes, far from the heart. – Portuguese Proverb

Favour oft avails more than justice or reason. – Portuguese Proverb

Feet accustomed to go cannot be still. – Portuguese Proverb

Feign death and the bull will leave you. – Portuguese Proverb

Fine words don’t fill the belly. – Portuguese Proverb

Fish’s child knows how to swim. – Portuguese Proverb

Follow the road and you will reach an inn. – Portuguese Proverb

Fools sometimes give wise men counsel. – Portuguese Proverb

Foot firm till death. – Portuguese Proverb

For a bad tongue scissors. – Portuguese Proverb

For a voracious beast pebbles in his feed. – Portuguese Proverb

For each mouth, a different soup. – Portuguese Proverb

For lack of men they made my father a justice. – Portuguese Proverb

For poor people small coin. – Portuguese Proverb

Four eyes see more than two. – Portuguese Proverb

Friends and mules fail us at hard passes. – Portuguese Proverb

Friends are flowers in the garden of life. – Portuguese Proverb

Friends are friends, business are business. – Portuguese Proverb

Friends are known in adversity. – Portuguese Proverb

From a closed door the devil turns away. – Portuguese Proverb

From dissension, the light is born. – Portuguese Proverb

From evil, the less. – Portuguese Proverb

From great rivers come great fish. – Portuguese Proverb

From plate to mouth you miss the soup. – Portuguese Proverb

From several possible events, the less worse happened. – Portuguese Proverb

From Spain can come neither good winds nor good marriages. – Portuguese Proverb

From the soldier who has no cloak, keep your own in your chest. – Portuguese Proverb

From the straws in the air we judge of the wind. – Portuguese Proverb

From the sublime to the ridiculous is only one step. – Portuguese Proverb

From the sweetest wine, the tartest vinegar. – Portuguese Proverb

Frost on the mutt, water on the bed. – Portuguese Proverb

Gain has a pleasant odor, come whence it will. – Portuguese Proverb

Gain has a pleasant odour, come whence it will. – Portuguese Proverb

Gambling sire, gambling son. – Portuguese Proverb

Get a good name and go to sleep. – Portuguese Proverb

Get a name to rise early, and you may lie all day. – Portuguese Proverb

Gifts break rocks. – Portuguese Proverb

Gifts from enemies are dangerous. – Portuguese Proverb

Give a grateful man more than he asks. – Portuguese Proverb

Give a hint to the man of sense, and consider the thing done. – Portuguese Proverb

Give a little, take a little. – Portuguese Proverb

Give a loaf, and beg a shive. – Portuguese Proverb

Give a man rope enough and he will hang himself. – Portuguese Proverb

Give and you shall receive. – Portuguese Proverb

Give me money, not advice. – Portuguese Proverb

Give orders, and do it yourself, and you will be rid of anxiety. – Portuguese Proverb

Give orders, and do no more, and nothing will be done. – Portuguese Proverb

Give to the poor, lend to God. – Portuguese Proverb

Go not with every ailment to the doctor, nor with every plaint to lawyer. – Portuguese Proverb

Go not with every hunger to the cupboard, nor with every thirst to the pitcher. – Portuguese Proverb

Go to bed late, rise early, you will see your own harm and that of others. – Portuguese Proverb

Go to bed without supper, you will rise without debt. – Portuguese Proverb

Go to your rich friend’s house when invited; to your poor friend’s without invitation. – Portuguese Proverb

God give you luck, my son, for little wit must serve your turn. – Portuguese Proverb

God gives clothes according to the cold. – Portuguese Proverb

God gives nuts to who has no teeth. – Portuguese Proverb

God grant me to dispute with those who understand me. – Portuguese Proverb

God has given nuts to one who has no teeth. – Portuguese Proverb

God has given nuts to some who have no teeth. – Portuguese Proverb

God heals, and the doctor gets the money. – Portuguese Proverb

God helps him who wakes up early at dawn. – Portuguese Proverb

God helps them that help themselves. – Portuguese Proverb

God helps those who help themselves. – Portuguese Proverb

God permits, but not for ever. – Portuguese Proverb

God writes straight by broken lines. – Portuguese Proverb

Good and bad make up a city. – Portuguese Proverb

Good and quickly seldom meet. – Portuguese Proverb

Good fruit never comes from a bad tree. – Portuguese Proverb

Good habits result from resisting temptation. – Portuguese Proverb

Good is the delay which makes sure. – Portuguese Proverb

Good management is better than good income. – Portuguese Proverb

Good manners and plenty of money will make my son a gentlemen. – Portuguese Proverb

Good men are scarce. – Portuguese Proverb

Good news is rumored and bad news flies. – Portuguese Proverb

Good news is rumoured and bad news flies. – Portuguese Proverb

Good table, bad will. – Portuguese Proverb

Good take heed doth surely speed. – Portuguese Proverb

Good talk saves the food. – Portuguese Proverb

Good things come in small packages. – Portuguese Proverb

Good tree, good fruits. – Portuguese Proverb

Good wind needs no bush. – Portuguese Proverb

Good words and bad acts deceive both wise and wimple. – Portuguese Proverb

Grain by grain the hen fills her crop. – Portuguese Proverb

Grasp all, lose all. – Portuguese Proverb

Grasp no more than thy hand will hold. – Portuguese Proverb

Grass doesn’t grow on a busy street. – Portuguese Proverb

Grief for a dead wife lasts to the door. – Portuguese Proverb

Grief pent up will burst the heart. – Portuguese Proverb

Gulls on earth, storm in the sea.

Gulls on earth, storm in the sea. – Portuguese Proverb

Hard upon hard does not make a good wall. – Portuguese Proverb

Hard with hard doesn’t make a good wall. – Portuguese Proverb

Haste is the enemy of perfection. – Portuguese Proverb

Haste makes waste. – Portuguese Proverb

Having need of makes the ugly beautiful. – Portuguese Proverb

He avoided the fly and swallowed the spider. – Portuguese Proverb

He brooks no advice whose mind is made up. – Portuguese Proverb

He buys very dear who begs. – Portuguese Proverb

He doubts nothing who knows nothing. – Portuguese Proverb

He has a head, and so has a pin. – Portuguese Proverb

He has nothing who is not content with what he has. – Portuguese Proverb

He has nothing, for whom nothing is enough. – Portuguese Proverb

He is a fool who thinks that another does not think. – Portuguese Proverb

He is a good dog who goes to church. – Portuguese Proverb

He is an old saint, any may leave it in the hands of God. – Portuguese Proverb

He is my friend who grinds at my mill. – Portuguese Proverb

He is no friend that eats his own by himself, and mine with me. – Portuguese Proverb

He is no great heir that inherits not his ancestor’s virtues. – Portuguese Proverb

He is your friend who gets you out of a scrape. – Portuguese Proverb

He keeps his road well enough who gets rid of bad company. – Portuguese Proverb

He loves well who never forgets. – Portuguese Proverb

He made a pit and digged it, and has fallen into the ditch which he made. – Portuguese Proverb

He made a pit and dug it, and has fallen into the ditch which he made. – Portuguese Proverb

He made me mad To see him shine so brisk and smell so sweet. – Portuguese Proverb

He never was a friend who ceased to be so for a slight cause. – Portuguese Proverb

He should not complain of being cheated who buys the cloth by the sample. – Portuguese Proverb

He that does ill never wants for excuses. – Portuguese Proverb

He that will, does more that he that can. – Portuguese Proverb

He that would be old long must begin betimes. – Portuguese Proverb

He that would keep his eye sound must tie up his hand. – Portuguese Proverb

He threatens many who affronts one. – Portuguese Proverb

He threatens who is afraid. – Portuguese Proverb

He who all wants, all loses. – Portuguese Proverb

He who doesn’t cry doesn’t suckle. – Portuguese Proverb

He who goes out to sea loses his place. – Portuguese Proverb

He who has a glass roof must not throw stones at his neighbor’s. – Portuguese Proverb

He who has a glass roof must not throw stones at his neighbour’s. – Portuguese Proverb

He who has a good next, finds good friends. – Portuguese Proverb

He who has four and spends five, has no need of a purse. – Portuguese Proverb

He who has nothing is afraid of nothing. – Portuguese Proverb

He who is well prepared has half won the battle. – Portuguese Proverb

He who is well prepared has won the battle. – Portuguese Proverb

He who knows little soon blabs it. – Portuguese Proverb

He who knows, knows. He who doesn’t know, learns. – Portuguese Proverb

He who laughs last, laughs best. – Portuguese Proverb

He who lives shall see. – Portuguese Proverb

He who make more of you than he is wont, either means to cheat you or wants you. – Portuguese Proverb

He who makes one basket can make a hundred. – Portuguese Proverb

He who plants winds harvests storms. – Portuguese Proverb

He who sees face doesn’t see heart. – Portuguese Proverb

He who serves two masters has to lie to one. – Portuguese Proverb

He who stores, albeit being hungry, the rat will eat. – Portuguese Proverb

He who tells a tale adds another period. – Portuguese Proverb

He who treads softly goes far. – Portuguese Proverb

He who tries a bit of everything accomplishes much of nothing. – Portuguese Proverb

He who warns, a good friend is. – Portuguese Proverb

He who would catch fish must not mind wetting himself. – Portuguese Proverb

Hear, see, and say nothing if you would live in peace. – Portuguese Proverb

Hedgehogs are not to be killed with the fist. – Portuguese Proverb

Hell is crowded with people of good intentions. – Portuguese Proverb

Hell is full of good intentions. – Portuguese Proverb

Hell is paved with good intentions, and roofed with lost opportunities. – Portuguese Proverb

Hell is paved with good intentions, roofed in with lost opportunities. – Portuguese Proverb

Hell’s roof is made from lost causes. – Portuguese Proverb

Here you do, here you pay. – Portuguese Proverb

Home saints don’t make miracles. – Portuguese Proverb

Honey is not for the ass’s mouth. – Portuguese Proverb

Honor and profit will not keep in one sack. – Portuguese Proverb

Honour a good man that he may honour you, and a bad man that he may not dishonour you. – Portuguese Proverb

Honour and profit will not keep in one sack. – Portuguese Proverb

Hope is the last one to die. – Portuguese Proverb

Hope is the last to die. – Portuguese Proverb

How did you rear so many children? By being fondest of the little ones. – Portuguese Proverb

Hunger and cold surrender a man to his enemy. – Portuguese Proverb

Hunger is the best of the spices. – Portuguese Proverb

Hunger is the best seasoning. – Portuguese Proverb

I am on good terms with the friend who eats his bread with me. – Portuguese Proverb

I hate fetters though they be of gold. – Portuguese Proverb

I have nothing for dinner, sit down to table. – Portuguese Proverb

I kiss thee hide, because thou art to be a wine-bag. – Portuguese Proverb

I meant to cross myself and put out one of my eyes. – Portuguese Proverb

I renounce the friend who eats what is mine with me, and what is his own by himself. – Portuguese Proverb

I renounce the golden basin in which I have to spit blood. – Portuguese Proverb

I saw a man, who saw another man, who saw the sea. – Portuguese Proverb

I see by my daughter’s face when the devil lays hold of my son-in-law. – Portuguese Proverb

I want more for my teeth than for my relations. – Portuguese Proverb

Idleness is mother to all vices. – Portuguese Proverb

If a poor man gives to you, he expects more in return. – Portuguese Proverb

If a rich man ate a snake, they would say it was because of his wisdom. – Portuguese Proverb

If kneeled, then you’ve gotta pray. – Portuguese Proverb

If life gives you a lemon, make a caipirinha out of it. – Portuguese Proverb

If marriage were a good thing, it wouldn’t need witnesses. – Portuguese Proverb

If old age was the same as wisdom, any old donkey would be a celebrated Justice. – Portuguese Proverb

if one disdains, one wants to buy. – Portuguese Proverb

If one loves the ugly, one shall find it beautiful. – Portuguese Proverb

If rape is unavoidable, relax and enjoy it. – Portuguese Proverb

If the deceased is no good, one shouldn’t waste good candles on him. – Portuguese Proverb

If you can’t beat them, join them. – Portuguese Proverb

If you don’t have a dog, you hunt with a cat. – Portuguese Proverb

If you give orders and leave, the work won’t get done. – Portuguese Proverb

If you have a friend who is a doctor, then send him to your enemy’s house. – Portuguese Proverb

If you have a friend who is a physician, send him to your enemy’s house. – Portuguese Proverb

If you have a lemon, make lemonade out of it. – Portuguese Proverb

If you have no enemies, then fortune passed you by. – Portuguese Proverb

If you know what a dollar is worth, try to borrow it. – Portuguese Proverb

If you laugh to-day, you will cry to-morrow. – Portuguese Proverb

If you live in a mud house, beware of storms. – Portuguese Proverb

If you want clear water, draw it from the spring. – Portuguese Proverb

If you want good advice, consult an old man. – Portuguese Proverb

If you want to be served, serve yourself. – Portuguese Proverb

If you want to know villain, give him a stick. – Portuguese Proverb

If you would be a good judge, hear what every one says. – Portuguese Proverb

If you would be happy for a week take a wife; if you would be happy for a month kill a pig; but if you would be happy all your life plant a garden. – Portuguese Proverb

If you would be healthy, be sage betimes. – Portuguese Proverb

If you would be in good repute, let not the sun find you in bed. – Portuguese Proverb

If you would grow poor without perceiving it, employ workmen and go to sleep. – Portuguese Proverb

If you would have the dog follow you, give him bread. – Portuguese Proverb

If you would make an enemy, lend a man money, and ask for it back again. – Portuguese Proverb

Ill befal the belly that forgets eaten bread. – Portuguese Proverb

Ill fares the young bird in the urchin’s hand. – Portuguese Proverb

Ill weeds are not hurt by frost. – Portuguese Proverb

In a breadless home, everyone complains and nobody is right. – Portuguese Proverb

In a closed mouth the flies can’t come in. – Portuguese Proverb

In a dangerous river, the alligators swim backstroke. – Portuguese Proverb

In a piranha infested river, monkeys drink water using a straw. – Portuguese Proverb

In a quarrel between a husband and his wife, keep away. – Portuguese Proverb

In adversity is when friendship is proven. – Portuguese Proverb

In April, tons of water. – Portuguese Proverb

In at one ear and out at the other. – Portuguese Proverb

In blacksmith’s house, wood skewer. – Portuguese Proverb

In default of bread, meal cakes are good. – Portuguese Proverb

In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is a king. – Portuguese Proverb

In the long run, the greyhound kills the hare. – Portuguese Proverb

In war, hunting, and love, for one pleasure a hundred pains. – Portuguese Proverb

Iron kills iron dies. – Portuguese Proverb

Iron that is not used soon rusts. – Portuguese Proverb

It befits the king to be liberal, for he is sure of never falling into poverty. – Portuguese Proverb

It dawns none the sooner for all one’s early rising. – Portuguese Proverb

It fares ill with the house when the distaff commands the sword. – Portuguese Proverb

It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest. – Portuguese Proverb

It is approved alchemy to have an income and spend nothing. – Portuguese Proverb

It is bad to have a servant, but worse to have a master. – Portuguese Proverb

It is better to receive awards that you don’t deserve rather than deserve them and not receive them. – Portuguese Proverb

It is hard to please Greeks and Trojans. – Portuguese Proverb

It is nothing, they are only killing my husband. – Portuguese Proverb

It is nothing — they are only thrashing my husband. – Portuguese Proverb

It is the nature of the greyhound to carry a long tail. – Portuguese Proverb

It is the one who sticks his hand in the stew pot who can feel how hot it is.

It is well to know how to be silent till it is time to speak. – Portuguese Proverb

It takes two to begin a fight. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s an ill supper which come from other’s hand. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s best to prevent than to have to remedy. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s better not to poke a jaguar with a short staff. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s better one ‘Take this’ than two ‘I will give this to you’. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s better who God helps than who early arouses. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s easier to catch a liar than a limping person. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s hard to please Greeks and Trojans at the same time. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s hard to please Greeks and Troyans. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s like exchanging six for half a dozen. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s not worth undressing a saint to dress another one. – Portuguese Proverb

It’s when it’s small that the cucumber gets warped. – Portuguese Proverb

Jack is as good as his master. – Portuguese Proverb

Jack of all trades and master of none. – Portuguese Proverb

Jack will never make a gentleman. – Portuguese Proverb

Justice begins at home. – Portuguese Proverb

Keep good company and you shall be of the number. – Portuguese Proverb

Keep no more cats than will catch mice. – Portuguese Proverb

Keep your sickness until Friday and don’t fast. – Portuguese Proverb

King’s entreaties are commands. – Portuguese Proverb

Kings have long arms. – Portuguese Proverb

Knowledge is power. – Portuguese Proverb

Laugh better he who laughs last. – Portuguese Proverb

Laws go where dollars please. – Portuguese Proverb

Laws go where money pleases. – Portuguese Proverb

Lay your hand on your bosom and you will not speak ill of another. – Portuguese Proverb

Layovers for meddlers. – Portuguese Proverb

Lean meat from a fat pig. – Portuguese Proverb

Let every man look to the bread upon which he must depend. – Portuguese Proverb

Let every man mind his own business, and leave others to theirs. – Portuguese Proverb

Let every one be content with what God has given him. – Portuguese Proverb

Let every sheep hand by its own leg. – Portuguese Proverb

Let him eat the tough morsel who eat the tender. – Portuguese Proverb

Let him who gives say nothing, and him who receives speak. – Portuguese Proverb

Let me go warm, and folks may laugh. – Portuguese Proverb

Let not him that has a mouth ask another to blow. – Portuguese Proverb

Let not the bottom of your purse or of your mind be seen. – Portuguese Proverb

Let not the tongue utter what the head must pay for. – Portuguese Proverb

Let the dog bark at me, so he don’t bite me. – Portuguese Proverb

Let the giver be silent and the receiver speak. – Portuguese Proverb

Let the guts be full, for it is they that carry the legs. – Portuguese Proverb

Lies have short legs. – Portuguese Proverb

Life begins at 40! – Portuguese Proverb

Like father, like son. – Portuguese Proverb

Like king, like law; like law, like people. – Portuguese Proverb

Little chips kindle fire, and big logs sustain it. – Portuguese Proverb

Live to live and you will learn to live. – Portuguese Proverb

love and faith are seen in their works. – Portuguese Proverb

Love and faith are seen in works. – Portuguese Proverb

Love and lordship like no fellowship. – Portuguese Proverb

Love has no law. – Portuguese Proverb

Love is blind. – Portuguese Proverb

Love is paid with love. – Portuguese Proverb

Love knows no law. – Portuguese Proverb

Love should be paid with love. – Portuguese Proverb

Lovers’ fights, double loves. – Portuguese Proverb

Lovers’ quarrels are love redoubled. – Portuguese Proverb

Luck favors the bold. – Portuguese Proverb

Luck favours the bold. – Portuguese Proverb

Lying pays no tax. – Portuguese Proverb

Mad as a wet hen. – Portuguese Proverb

Mad love, I for you and you for another. – Portuguese Proverb

Make a silver bridge for a flying enemy. – Portuguese Proverb

Make good flour and you need no trumpet. – Portuguese Proverb

Make the night night, and the day day, and you will have a pleasant time of it. – Portuguese Proverb

Make the night night, and the day day, and you will live pleasantly. – Portuguese Proverb

Make your son you heir and not your steward. – Portuguese Proverb

Make yourself honey and the flies will eat you. – Portuguese Proverb

Man is fire, woman is tow, and the devil comes and blows. – Portuguese Proverb

Many kiss the hand they would gladly see cut off. – Portuguese Proverb

Many little makes a mickle. – Portuguese Proverb

Married couples who love each other tell each other a thousand things without talking. – Portuguese Proverb

Marry me forthwith, mother, for my face is growing wrinkled. – Portuguese Proverb

Marry your son when you please, your daughter when you can. – Portuguese Proverb

Marry, and grow tame. – Portuguese Proverb

Marry, marry, and what about the housekeeping. – Portuguese Proverb

Marry, marry, and what of the management of the house? – Portuguese Proverb

Marry, marry, sounds well but tastes ill. – Portuguese Proverb

Marrying sounds well, but tastes ill. – Portuguese Proverb

Martha sings well when she has had her fill. – Portuguese Proverb

Meddle not in what you don’t understand. – Portuguese Proverb

Meowing cats catch fewer mice. – Portuguese Proverb

Michael, Michael, you have no bees, and yet you sell honey. – Portuguese Proverb

Misers’ money goes twice to market. – Portuguese Proverb

Misery loves company. – Portuguese Proverb

Money alone can’t make one happy. – Portuguese Proverb

Money doesn’t bring happiness. – Portuguese Proverb

Money doesn’t sprout on trees. – Portuguese Proverb

Money is not gained by losing time. – Portuguese Proverb

Money is the measure of all things. – Portuguese Proverb

Money is the root of all evil. – Portuguese Proverb

Money lent, an enemy made. – Portuguese Proverb

Money makes a man. – Portuguese Proverb

Money soothes more than the words of a cavalier. – Portuguese Proverb

Money wins the battle, not the long arm. – Portuguese Proverb

More grows in a garden than the gardener sows there. – Portuguese Proverb

More haste, less speed. – Portuguese Proverb

Mouth from honey, heart of gall. – Portuguese Proverb

Mouth of honey, heart of gall. – Portuguese Proverb

Much caution does no harm. – Portuguese Proverb

Much chatter, little wit. – Portuguese Proverb

Much coin, much care. – Portuguese Proverb

Much cry and little wool. – Portuguese Proverb

Much laugher, short wisdom. – Portuguese Proverb

Much laughter, little brains. – Portuguese Proverb

Much laughter, little wit. – Portuguese Proverb

Much law, but little justice. – Portuguese Proverb

Much meat, much maladies. – Portuguese Proverb

Much never cost little. – Portuguese Proverb

Much straw and little corn. – Portuguese Proverb

My chest locked, my soul safe. – Portuguese Proverb

My gossips don’t like me because I tell them truths. – Portuguese Proverb

My life and soul at your service, but not the pack-saddle. – Portuguese Proverb

My money, your money, let us go to the tavern. – Portuguese Proverb

Necessity makes the frog jump. – Portuguese Proverb

Neither handsome enough to kill nor ugly enough to frighten away. – Portuguese Proverb

Neither trust or contend, nor lay wagers or lend, and you’ll have peace to your end. – Portuguese Proverb

Never cut what can be untied. – Portuguese Proverb

Never mention rope in the house of a man who has been hanged. – Portuguese Proverb

Never poke a jaguar with a short stick. – Portuguese Proverb

Never say ‘from this water I shall not drink’. – Portuguese Proverb

Never say, of this water I will not drink, of this bread I will not eat. – Portuguese Proverb

Never say: ‘of this water I will never drink.’ – Portuguese Proverb

Never tell all that you know, or do all that you can, or believe all that you hear. – Portuguese Proverb

No better moonshine than in august. – Portuguese Proverb

No flies get into a shut mouth. – Portuguese Proverb

No one has seen to-morrow. – Portuguese Proverb

No one is a good judge in his own cause. – Portuguese Proverb

No one is a good judge of his own case. – Portuguese Proverb

No one is a prophet in his own land. – Portuguese Proverb

No one is always right. – Portuguese Proverb

No one is content with his lot. – Portuguese Proverb

No one is poor but he who thinks himself so. – Portuguese Proverb

No woman is ugly if she is well dressed. – Portuguese Proverb

No word is ill spoken, that is not ill taken. – Portuguese Proverb

No. 1 is the first house in the row. – Portuguese Proverb

Not all that is true is to be spoken. – Portuguese Proverb

Not everything that shines is gold. – Portuguese Proverb

Not much can be done when everyone is giving orders. – Portuguese Proverb

Not much is achieved where everyone gives the orders. – Portuguese Proverb

Not only of bread lives a man. – Portuguese Proverb

Not only of bread will the man live. – Portuguese Proverb

Nothing falls into the mouth of a sleeping fox. – Portuguese Proverb

Nothing ventured, nothing gained. – Portuguese Proverb

Of a given horse, one shouldn’t check the teeth. – Portuguese Proverb

Of doctor and crazy, we all have a little. – Portuguese Proverb

Of evils, choose the least. – Portuguese Proverb

Of oil, wine, and friends, the oldest. – Portuguese Proverb

Of soup and love, the first is the best. – Portuguese Proverb

Of the good man a good pledge, and of the bad neither pledge nor surety. – Portuguese Proverb

Of two cowards, the one who attacks conquers the other. – Portuguese Proverb

Old donkeys do not learn languages. – Portuguese Proverb

Old horse doesn’t learn how to walk. – Portuguese Proverb

Old monkeys don’t put their hand in jars. – Portuguese Proverb

On a fool’s beard all learn to shave. – Portuguese Proverb

Once bitten twice shy. – Portuguese Proverb

One bird in the hand is worth two flying. – Portuguese Proverb

One doesn’t examine the teeth of a gift horse. – Portuguese Proverb

One fool makes a hundred. – Portuguese Proverb

One good word puts out the flames better than a bucket of water. – Portuguese Proverb

One grain does not full the granary, but it helps its companion. – Portuguese Proverb

One guy’s good luck is the other guy’s bad luck. – Portuguese Proverb

One hand washes the other and both of them wash the face. – Portuguese Proverb

One knows where the shoes hurt. – Portuguese Proverb

One man’s happiness is another man’s sadness. – Portuguese Proverb

One misfortune brings on another. – Portuguese Proverb

One only gives what one has. – Portuguese Proverb

One wolf does not kill another. – Portuguese Proverb

One wrong submitted to, another follows. – Portuguese Proverb

One year’s seeding makes seven years weeding. – Portuguese Proverb

Only a bull knows best its own desires and can best supply them. – Portuguese Proverb

Only people who work make mistakes. – Portuguese Proverb

Open your purse, and I will open my mouth. – Portuguese Proverb

Opportunity makes the thief. – Portuguese Proverb

Other times, other counsels. – Portuguese Proverb

Our union makes us stronger. – Portuguese Proverb

Out of sight out of mind. – Portuguese Proverb

Out of the fullness of the heart the mouth speaks. – Portuguese Proverb

Out of the fulness of the heart the mouth speaketh. – Portuguese Proverb

Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee. – Portuguese Proverb

Party over, musicians by foot. – Portuguese Proverb

Passed waters can’t move the mills. – Portuguese Proverb

Passed waters don’t move watermills. – Portuguese Proverb

Past waters don’t power mills. – Portuguese Proverb

Pay what you owe, you will get well of your malady. – Portuguese Proverb

Peace with a club in hand is war. – Portuguese Proverb

Peace with a cudgel in hand is war. – Portuguese Proverb

Pepper in someone else’s eyes is a salve. – Portuguese Proverb

Perseverance kills the game. – Portuguese Proverb

Pigs in the cold and men in drink make a great noise. – Portuguese Proverb

Play with an ass, and he will slap your face with his tail. – Portuguese Proverb

Poetry don’t put bread in the oven. – Portuguese Proverb

Poverty is not vile. – Portuguese Proverb

Poverty never sped well in love. – Portuguese Proverb

Poverty parteth friends. – Portuguese Proverb

Praise in own mouth is insult. – Portuguese Proverb

Pray to the saint until you have passed the slough. – Portuguese Proverb

Prepare a nest for the hen and she will lay eggs for you. – Portuguese Proverb

Pretend to be dead and the bull will leave you alone. – Portuguese Proverb

Priests, cousins and pigeons. The first two are not good to marry. The Last two, serve only to filth the house. – Portuguese Proverb

Promising is not giving, but serves to content fools. – Portuguese Proverb

Raised children, doubled work. – Portuguese Proverb

Rather a husband with one eye than with one son. – Portuguese Proverb

Rather alone than in bad company. – Portuguese Proverb

Rather go rob with good men than pray with bad. – Portuguese Proverb

Rather lose the wool than the sheep. – Portuguese Proverb

Revenge is a dish served cold. – Portuguese Proverb

Right or wrong, our house up to the roof. – Portuguese Proverb

Rise early, and you will observe; labor and you will have. – Portuguese Proverb

Rise early, and you will observe; labour, and you will have. – Portuguese Proverb

Rome and Pavia weren’t built in a day. – Portuguese Proverb

Rome was not built in a day. – Portuguese Proverb

Rosary in the hand, and the devil in the heart. – Portuguese Proverb

Rosary is hand, the devil at heart. – Portuguese Proverb

Running by one’s will never gets tired. – Portuguese Proverb

Saints appear to fools. – Portuguese Proverb

Saints don’t fill the belly. – Portuguese Proverb

Scratch my back and I will scratch yours. – Portuguese Proverb

Seat yourself in your place, and they will not make you rise. – Portuguese Proverb

Send a man of sense on the embassy, and you need not instruct him. – Portuguese Proverb

Serve a lord, and you will know what it is to be vexed. – Portuguese Proverb

She is well married who has neither mother-in-law nor sister-in-law. – Portuguese Proverb

She stoops to conquer. – Portuguese Proverb

Short reckonings make long friends. – Portuguese Proverb

Show me a poor man, I will show you a flatterer. – Portuguese Proverb

Shut your door, and you will make your neighbour good. – Portuguese Proverb

Shut your mouth and you’ll catch no flies. – Portuguese Proverb

Silence is golden. – Portuguese Proverb

Silly words make ears deaf. – Portuguese Proverb

Sloth is the key to poverty. – Portuguese Proverb

Sloth is the mother of poverty. – Portuguese Proverb

Slow but sure. – Portuguese Proverb

Slow help is no help. – Portuguese Proverb

Slowly one goes far. – Portuguese Proverb

Small man, sly or dancer. – Portuguese Proverb

Soft water constantly striking the hard stone, wears it at last. – Portuguese Proverb

Soft water on hard rock, beats so much that it perforates it. – Portuguese Proverb

Soft words and hard arguments. – Portuguese Proverb

Some bad things come for good. – Portuguese Proverb

Speak little and well, they will think you somebody. – Portuguese Proverb

Speak not ill of the year until it is past. – Portuguese Proverb

Speak not of my debts unless you mean to pay them. – Portuguese Proverb

Spilt salt is never well collected. – Portuguese Proverb

Spinner, spin quietly, so as not to disturb me; I am praying. – Portuguese Proverb

Spinner, spin softly, you disturb me; I am praying. – Portuguese Proverb

Stolen house, locks on the door. – Portuguese Proverb

Strength comes from Union. – Portuguese Proverb

Strike while the iron is hot. – Portuguese Proverb

Stumbling is not falling. – Portuguese Proverb

Supper is soon served up in a plentiful house. – Portuguese Proverb

Sweet are the tears that are dried by your loved one. – Portuguese Proverb

Taking out without putting in, soon comes to the bottom. – Portuguese Proverb

Talk of the wolf and behold his skin. – Portuguese Proverb

Tell her she is handsome, and you will turn her brain. – Portuguese Proverb

Tell me with whom thou goest, and I’ll tell thee what thou doest. – Portuguese Proverb

Tell me your friends and I’ll tell you who you are. – Portuguese Proverb

Tell your friend a lie. If he keeps it secret, then tell him the truth. – Portuguese Proverb

Tell your friend your secret, and he will set his foot on your neck. – Portuguese Proverb

Tell your friends a lie; if he keeps it secret tell him the truth. – Portuguese Proverb

The accomplice is as bad as the thief. – Portuguese Proverb

The archer that shoots badly has a lie ready. – Portuguese Proverb

The ass dead, the corn at his tail. – Portuguese Proverb

The ass does not know the value of his tail till he has lost it. – Portuguese Proverb

The ass embraced the thistle, and they found themselves relations. – Portuguese Proverb

The ass of many owners is eaten by wolves. – Portuguese Proverb

The ass that is hungry eats thistles. – Portuguese Proverb

The ass that trespasses on a stranger’s premises will leave them laden with wood. – Portuguese Proverb

The ass well knows in whose house he brays. – Portuguese Proverb

The ass’s son brays one hour daily. – Portuguese Proverb

The bad neighbor gives a needle without thread. – Portuguese Proverb

The bad neighbour gives a needle without thread. – Portuguese Proverb

The beast that goes well never wants a rider to try its paces. – Portuguese Proverb

The belly does not accept bail. – Portuguese Proverb

The belly warm, the foot at rest. – Portuguese Proverb

The better day the better deed. – Portuguese Proverb

The bigger the river the bigger the fish. – Portuguese Proverb

The bigger they are, the harder they fall. – Portuguese Proverb

The bird hunting a locust is unaware of the hawk hunting him. – Portuguese Proverb

The blind man has picked up a coin. – Portuguese Proverb

The blunders of physicians are covered by the earth. – Portuguese Proverb

The bread eaten, the company departs. – Portuguese Proverb

The bread never falls but on its buttered side. – Portuguese Proverb

The cat bit your tongue. – Portuguese Proverb

The cat is a good friend, only she scratches. – Portuguese Proverb

The cat well knows whose beard she licks. – Portuguese Proverb

The cheap things prove to be expensive at the end. – Portuguese Proverb

The chicken that stays in the farmyard, will peck the crumbs. – Portuguese Proverb

the child and the little bird, God catches the fall. – Portuguese Proverb

The coward is always in danger. – Portuguese Proverb

The dead and the absent have no friends. – Portuguese Proverb

The dead open the eyes of the living. – Portuguese Proverb

The devil is not so ugly as he is painted. – Portuguese Proverb

The dog that barks much is never good for hunting. – Portuguese Proverb

The dog that barks much, bites little. – Portuguese Proverb

The dog that kills wolves, is killed by wolves. – Portuguese Proverb

The dog wags his tail, not for you, but for your bread. – Portuguese Proverb

The end crowns the work. – Portuguese Proverb

The end justifies the means. – Portuguese Proverb

The ends justify the means. – Portuguese Proverb

The envious man’s face grows lean and his eye swells. – Portuguese Proverb

The father a saint the son a devil. – Portuguese Proverb

The fear of God is the beginning of all wisdom. – Portuguese Proverb

The fingers of the same hand are not alike. – Portuguese Proverb

The fisherman fishes in troubled water. – Portuguese Proverb

The fool passes for wise if he is silent. – Portuguese Proverb

The fox knows much, but more he that catcheth him. – Portuguese Proverb

The Frenchman sings well, when his throat is moistened. – Portuguese Proverb

The full-fed sheep is frightened at its own tail. – Portuguese Proverb

The gardener’s dog neither eats greens not lets any one else eat them. – Portuguese Proverb

The gentle calf sucks all the cows. – Portuguese Proverb

The grass is always greener on your neighbor’s yard. – Portuguese Proverb

The greyhound that starts many hares kills none. – Portuguese Proverb

The guests will go away, and we will eat the pasty. – Portuguese Proverb

The habit doesn’t make the monk. – Portuguese Proverb

The hawk does not nest with the sparrow. – Portuguese Proverb

The headache is mine and the cows are ours. – Portuguese Proverb

The hen that stays at home picks up the crumbs. – Portuguese Proverb

The hen’s eyes turn to where she has her eggs. – Portuguese Proverb

The hole invites the thief. – Portuguese Proverb

The horse’s best allowance is his master’s eye. – Portuguese Proverb

The key at the girdle keeps me good and my neighbour too. – Portuguese Proverb

The king of the bees has no sting. – Portuguese Proverb

The lame goat does not take a siesta. – Portuguese Proverb

The law devised, its evasion contrived. – Portuguese Proverb

The lazy servant takes eight steps to avoid one. – Portuguese Proverb

The loss which your neighbour does not know is no real loss. – Portuguese Proverb

The loudest bark rids not a dog of his fleas. – Portuguese Proverb

The lucky man has a daughter for his first-born. – Portuguese Proverb

The mad dog bites its master. – Portuguese Proverb

The malady that is more incurable is folly. – Portuguese Proverb

The man of sense does not hang up his knowledge. – Portuguese Proverb

The man of your own trade is your enemy. – Portuguese Proverb

The mare’s kick does not harm the colt. – Portuguese Proverb

The mare’s kicks are caresses to the colt. – Portuguese Proverb

The master orders the man, the man orders the cat, and the cat orders her tail. – Portuguese Proverb

The master’s eye makes the horse fat. – Portuguese Proverb

The midwifes fight, the truths are uncovered. – Portuguese Proverb

The mill does not grind with water that is past. – Portuguese Proverb

The misfortune of many is a consolation. – Portuguese Proverb

The mistress is queen, the wife is the slave. – Portuguese Proverb

The mother-in-law does not remember that she was once a daughter-in-law. – Portuguese Proverb

The mouth that says “Yes,” can say “No.” – Portuguese Proverb

The nest made, the bird dead. – Portuguese Proverb

The night is good counsellor. – Portuguese Proverb

The old saints are forgotten in the new. – Portuguese Proverb

The one in a hurry, will have a raw and hot meal. – Portuguese Proverb

The one who knelled, must pray. – Portuguese Proverb

The one who left, lost his place. – Portuguese Proverb

The one-eyes is a king in the land of the blind. – Portuguese Proverb

The only good Indian is a dead Indian. – Portuguese Proverb

The only good thing that comes from the east is the sun. – Portuguese Proverb

The opportunity makes the thief. – Portuguese Proverb

The owner’s eye fattens the horse. – Portuguese Proverb

The ox that tossed me threw me into a good place. – Portuguese Proverb

The person who is well prepared has already won half of the battle. – Portuguese Proverb

The person who is well prepared has already won half of the battle. – Portuguese Proverb

The pitcher that goes often to the well leaves either its handle or its spout there. – Portuguese Proverb

The poor man eats at double cost. – Portuguese Proverb

The pot that boils too much loses its flavour. – Portuguese Proverb

The queen bee has no sting. – Portuguese Proverb

The rat does not leave the cat’s house with a bellyful. – Portuguese Proverb

The rat that knows but one hole is soon caught. – Portuguese Proverb

The rat which has but one hole is soon caught. – Portuguese Proverb

The righteous pays for the sinner. – Portuguese Proverb

The ripest fruit will not fall into your mouth. – Portuguese Proverb

The rivers flow to the ocean. – Portuguese Proverb

The savage ox grows tame on strange ground. – Portuguese Proverb

The sheep that bleats loses a mouthful. – Portuguese Proverb

The son-in-law’s sack is never full. – Portuguese Proverb

The sooner begun, the sooner done. – Portuguese Proverb

The sooty oven mocks the black chimney. – Portuguese Proverb

The Sun rises for everybody. – Portuguese Proverb

The swindler readily cheats the covetous man. – Portuguese Proverb

The sword and the ring according to the hand that bears them. – Portuguese Proverb

The tailor ill-dressed, the shoemaker ill-shod. – Portuguese Proverb

The thief becomes the gallows well. – Portuguese Proverb

The thief proceeds from a needle to gold, and from gold to the gallows. – Portuguese Proverb

The thief thinks that all are like himself. – Portuguese Proverb

The thief who steals another one is forgiven for 100 years. – Portuguese Proverb

The tired mare goes willingly to grass. – Portuguese Proverb

The toad does not come into the daylight without reason. – Portuguese Proverb

The tongue goes to the aching tooth. – Portuguese Proverb

The treason approved, the traitor abhorred. – Portuguese Proverb

The wine-skin has its reasons for smelling of pitch. – Portuguese Proverb

The wolf eats of what is counted. – Portuguese Proverb

The wolf is well pleased with the kick of a sheep. – Portuguese Proverb

The wolf loses his teeth, but not his inclination. – Portuguese Proverb

The wolf never wants a pretext against the lamb. – Portuguese Proverb

The worst blind is that who doesn’t want to see. – Portuguese Proverb

The worst pig eats the best acorn. – Portuguese Proverb

The worth of a thing is what it will bring. – Portuguese Proverb

The wrath of brothers is the wrath of devils. – Portuguese Proverb

There are bad things that come for the good. – Portuguese Proverb

There are ills that happen for good. – Portuguese Proverb

There are many ways to leave this world but only one way to come into it. – Portuguese Proverb

There are no roses without thorns. – Portuguese Proverb

There die as many lambs as wethers. – Portuguese Proverb

There is a remedy for everything; it is called death. – Portuguese Proverb

There is more than one way to skin a cat. Make do with what you have. – Portuguese Proverb

There is never wanting a dog to bark at you. – Portuguese Proverb

There is no day without its night. – Portuguese Proverb

There is no pleasure that does not pall, the more so if it costs nothing. – Portuguese Proverb

There is plenty of corn in Castile, but he who has none, starves. – Portuguese Proverb

There is reason in the roasting of eggs. – Portuguese Proverb

There’s no catching trouts with dry breeches. – Portuguese Proverb

There’s no compassion like the penny. – Portuguese Proverb

There’s no handsome woman on the wedding day, except the bride. – Portuguese Proverb

There’s no living without friends. – Portuguese Proverb

They are rich who have friends. – Portuguese Proverb

Thief who steals thief has one hundred years of pardon. – Portuguese Proverb

Think of many things — do one. – Portuguese Proverb

Think of many things, but do just one at a time. – Portuguese Proverb

Think of many things, do one. – Portuguese Proverb

Think of many things, do only one. – Portuguese Proverb

Thinking is not knowing. – Portuguese Proverb

Thinking of where you are going, you forget from whence you came. – Portuguese Proverb

Third time is the charm. – Portuguese Proverb

Third time lucky. – Portuguese Proverb

Third time pays for all. – Portuguese Proverb

Those who are born to be small shit never make it to big shit. – Portuguese Proverb

Those who are born to pennies never make it to pounds. – Portuguese Proverb

Though the heron flied high the falcon kills it. – Portuguese Proverb

Though the mastiff be gentle, yet bite him not by the lip. – Portuguese Proverb

Though we are negroes, we are men, and have souls. – Portuguese Proverb

Though we may pluck flowers by the way we may not sleep among flowers. – Portuguese Proverb

Though your mastiff be gentle, do not bite his lip. – Portuguese Proverb

Threads do not break for being fine, but for being gouty and ill-spun. – Portuguese Proverb

Threatened folks eat bread. – Portuguese Proverb

Three brothers, three fortresses. – Portuguese Proverb

Three or four daily will bring you to the bottom of the sack. – Portuguese Proverb

Throw that bone to another dog. – Portuguese Proverb

Throwing your cap at a bird is not the way to catch it. – Portuguese Proverb

Time and the hour are not to be tied with a rope. – Portuguese Proverb

Time is money. – Portuguese Proverb

Times passes like the wind. – Portuguese Proverb

Times tries a’. – Portuguese Proverb

To a hasty question a leisurely answer. – Portuguese Proverb

To be slow in giving ant to refuse, are alike. – Portuguese Proverb

To change one’s habits has a smell of death. – Portuguese Proverb

To change one’s habits smacks of death. – Portuguese Proverb

To eat and to itch is in the beginning. – Portuguese Proverb

To err is human; to forgive is divine. – Portuguese Proverb

To give is honor, to beg is dishonor. – Portuguese Proverb

To give is honour, to beg is dishonour. – Portuguese Proverb

To lather an ass’s head is only wasting soap. – Portuguese Proverb

To love and be wise is incompatible. – Portuguese Proverb

To make an error is human, keep doing it is foolishness. – Portuguese Proverb

To make an error is human; pushing the same error is dumb. – Portuguese Proverb

To promise much means giving little. – Portuguese Proverb

to sail is necessary, survive is not necessary. – Portuguese Proverb

To sell honey to one who keeps hives. – Portuguese Proverb

To separate the men from the boys. – Portuguese Proverb

To the bold man Fortune holds out her hand. – Portuguese Proverb

To the child and the little bird, God catches the fall. – Portuguese Proverb

To the lean pig a fat acorn. – Portuguese Proverb

Too many candles will burn down the church. – Portuguese Proverb

Too much alms, the saint will be suspicious. – Portuguese Proverb

Too much familiarity breeds contempt. – Portuguese Proverb

Too much wax burns the church. – Portuguese Proverb

Trust not a dog that limps. – Portuguese Proverb

Trust not a horse’s heels. – Portuguese Proverb

Trust not a new friend or an old enemy. – Portuguese Proverb

Trust not tow with firebrands, not a woman with men. – Portuguese Proverb

Trust the virgin and don’t run. – Portuguese Proverb

Truth and oil come to the surface. – Portuguese Proverb

Two eyes see better than only one. – Portuguese Proverb

Two eyes see more than one. – Portuguese Proverb

Under a shabby cloak may be a smart drinker. – Portuguese Proverb

Under fair words beware of fraud. – Portuguese Proverb

Under the sackcloth there is something else. – Portuguese Proverb

Unlucky in gambling, lucky in love. – Portuguese Proverb

Unused iron is ruined by rust. – Portuguese Proverb

Vile let him be who deems himself vile. – Portuguese Proverb

Visits always give a pleasure—if not the arriving, then the departing. – Portuguese Proverb

Visits always give pleasure — if not at the arrival, then at the departure. – Portuguese Proverb

Visits always give pleasure – if not the arrival, the departure. – Portuguese Proverb

Walls have ears. – Portuguese Proverb

Walls sink and dunghills rise. – Portuguese Proverb

Walnuts and pears you plant for your heirs. – Portuguese Proverb

War is sweet to him who does not go to it. – Portuguese Proverb

Water by Saint John’s takes oil and doesn’t give bread. – Portuguese Proverb

Water washes everything. – Portuguese Proverb

We have not saddled and yet we are riding. – Portuguese Proverb

Well begun is half done. – Portuguese Proverb

What can’t be cured, must be endured. – Portuguese Proverb

What doesn’t have any remedy is no longer a problem. – Portuguese Proverb

What is another’s always sighs for its master. – Portuguese Proverb

What is bought is cheaper than a gift. – Portuguese Proverb

What is marriage, mother? Daughter, it is spinning, bearing children, and weeping. – Portuguese Proverb

What the eyes don’t see the heart doesn’t feel. – Portuguese Proverb

What the fool does at last the wise man does at first. – Portuguese Proverb

What was hard to bear is sweet to remember. – Portuguese Proverb

What water gives, water takes away. – Portuguese Proverb

What’s everybody’s work is nobody’s work. – Portuguese Proverb

When bulls fight, woe to the frogs. – Portuguese Proverb

When it is in an unlucky phase, the vulture below, shits on the vulture above. – Portuguese Proverb

When one speaks, the other should listen. – Portuguese Proverb

When the alms is too large, even a saint will be suspicious. – Portuguese Proverb

When the cat’s away the mice will play. – Portuguese Proverb

When the cucumber is small, you can warp it easier. – Portuguese Proverb

When the old dog barks, he gives counsel. – Portuguese Proverb

When the ox falls, there are many that will help to kill him. – Portuguese Proverb

When the wine is in, the wit is out. – Portuguese Proverb

When thieves fall out, their knaveries come to light. – Portuguese Proverb

Where friends, there riches. – Portuguese Proverb

Where shall the ox go but he must labour, since he knows how? – Portuguese Proverb

Where shall the ox go, and not have to plough? – Portuguese Proverb

Where the cock is the hen does not crow. – Portuguese Proverb

Where the river is deepest it makes the least noise. – Portuguese Proverb

Where the wolf gets one lamb he looks for another. – Portuguese Proverb

Where there is life there is hope. – Portuguese Proverb

Where there is little bread, cut first. – Portuguese Proverb

Where there is no fire, no smoke rises. – Portuguese Proverb

Where there is no honour there is no dishonour. – Portuguese Proverb

Where there is smoke there is fire. – Portuguese Proverb

Where there’s no fire there’s no smoke. – Portuguese Proverb

Where there’s no might there’s no right. – Portuguese Proverb

Where you tell your secret you surrender your freedom. – Portuguese Proverb

Where you were a page, be not an esquire. – Portuguese Proverb

While there’s life, there’s hope. – Portuguese Proverb

Whilst the tall maid is stooping, the little one sweeps the house. – Portuguese Proverb

Whilst we drink, prank ourselves, with wenches daily, Old age upon’s at unawares doth sally. – Portuguese Proverb

Whither goest thou, Misfortune? To where there is more. – Portuguese Proverb

Who eats his fowl alone, must saddle his horse alone. – Portuguese Proverb

Who faints not, achieves. – Portuguese Proverb

Who holds his peace and gathers stones, will find a time to throw them. – Portuguese Proverb

Who is hurry, goes walking. – Portuguese Proverb

Who stays quiet agrees. – Portuguese Proverb

Who will not when he can, can’t when he will. – Portuguese Proverb

Will he nill he, the ass must go the fair. – Portuguese Proverb

Win a bet of your friend, and drink it on the spot. – Portuguese Proverb

Wind and fortune are not lasting. – Portuguese Proverb

Wipe the nose of your neighbor’s son, and marry him to your daughter. – Portuguese Proverb

Wipe the nose of your neighbour’s son, and marry him to your daughter. – Portuguese Proverb

Wipe your sore eye with your elbow. – Portuguese Proverb

With iron you hurt, with iron you’ll get hurt. – Portuguese Proverb

Wolf doesn’t eat wolf. – Portuguese Proverb

Woman, wind, and luck soon change. – Portuguese Proverb

Women and glass are always in danger. – Portuguese Proverb

Women and glasses are always in danger. – Portuguese Proverb

Women are always better the following year. – Portuguese Proverb

Women are supernumerary when present, and missed when absent. – Portuguese Proverb

Words fly, writings remain. – Portuguese Proverb

Words, cast them to the wind. – Portuguese Proverb

Work done expects money. – Portuguese Proverb

Work expands so as to fill the time available. – Portuguese Proverb

Would you have me serve you, good king, give me the means of living. – Portuguese Proverb

Would you have potatoes grow by the pot-side? – Portuguese Proverb

Would you know your daughter? See her in company. – Portuguese Proverb

You can only take out of a bag what was already in it. – Brasil 

You can’t make a good shaft of a pig’s tail. – Portuguese Proverb

You can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear. – Portuguese Proverb

You can’t make horn of a pig’s tail. – Portuguese Proverb

You have lent and not recovered; and if recovered, not so much; and if so much, not such; and if such, a mortal enemy. – Portuguese Proverb

You have many strings to your bow. – Portuguese Proverb

You have to suffer a lot or die young. – Portuguese Proverb

You may keep yourself safe from fire, but not from a bad man. – Portuguese Proverb

You need not find a shelter for an old ox. – Portuguese Proverb

You reap what you sow. – Portuguese Proverb

You should not demise what you get for free. – Portuguese Proverb

You tie the horse at the will of the master. – Portuguese Proverb

You will know what something is really worth, when you loose it forever. – Portuguese Proverb

You will not see many with green eyes. – Portuguese Proverb

Your wife and sheep early at home. – Portuguese Proverb

Your windmill dwindles into a nutcrack. – Portuguese Proverb

Portuguese Proverb

Portuguese Proverbs Translation and Meanings

  • Ainda que vistas a mona de seda, mona se queda.
    • English equivalent: A golden bit does not make the horse any better.
    • “To those who are given to virtue, the boast of titles is wholly alien and distasteful.”
    • Petrarch, “On the Various Academic Titles,” De remediis utriusque fortunae, C. Rawski, trans. (1967), p. 73
  • Alcança quem não cansa.
    • English equivalent: Faint heart never won fair lady.
    • “Britain and France had to choose between war and dishonour. They chose dishonour. They will have war.” Winston Churchill to Neville Chamberlain in the House of Commons, after the Munich accords (1938).
  • A caridade começa em casa.
    • English equivalent: Charity begins at home.
    • It is easier to love humanity as a whole than to love one’s neighbor. … Some of the worst tyrannies of our day genuinely are ‘vowed’ to the service of mankind, yet can function only by pitting neighbor against neighbor. The all-seeing eye of a totalitarian regime is usually the watchful eye of the next-door neighbor. In a Communist state love of neighbor may be classed as counter-revolutionary.” Eric Hoffer, The Ordeal of Change (1963), Ch. 11: Brotherhood.
  • A curiosidade matou o gato.
    • English equivalent: Curiosity killed the cat.
    • “Inquisitiveness – or a desire to find about something – can lead you into trouble.”
    • “Remember Lot’s wife.” Luke, XVII. 32. Reported in Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 10-11.
  • A experiência é mãe da ciência.
    • English equivalent: Experience is the mother of wisdom.
  • A mal desesperado, remédio heróico.
    • English equivalent: Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.
    • “Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation.”
  • A melhor defesa é o ataque.
    • English equivalent: The best defence is a good offense.
    • Deolinda Milhano (2008). Dicionário de ditados (provérbios) e frases feitas. Edições Colibri. p. 27. ISBN 978-972-772-813-8. Retrieved on 21 June 2013.
  • A mentiroso, boa mémoria .
    • English equivalent: A liar should have a good memory.
    • “Liars must remember the untruths they have told, to avoid contradicting themselves at some later date.”
  • A necessidade não tem lei, mas a da fome sobre todas pode.
    • English equivalent: Needs must go when the devil drives.
  • A roupa suja lava-se em casa.
    • English Equivalent: Don’t wash your dirty linen in public; It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest.
    • “Why wantonly proclaim one’s own disgrace, or expose the faults or weaknesses of one’s kindred or people?”
    • “It is considered contemptible to defy the rule of solidarity by revealing facts harmful to the group one belongs to.” Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 109.
  • A quem sabe esperar ensejo, tudo vem a seu tempo e desejo.
    • English equivalent: He that can have patience can have what he will.
    • “If it is humanly possible, consider it within your reach.” Antonius, Marcus (180 BC). On Essays and Meditations.
  • A união faz a força.
    • English equivalent: United we stand, divided we fall; Union is strength.
  • Água mole em pedra dura, tanto dá até que fura.
    • English equivalent: Constant dropping wears the stone; Water dropping day by day wears the hardest rock away.
    • “A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books.” (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
  • Ao médico, ao letrado e ao abade, falar verdade.
    • English equivalent: Conceal not the truth from thy physcian and lawyer.
  • As aparências iludem.or, equivalently, As aparências enganam.
    • Translation: Looks can be deceiving.
  • Antes só do que mal acompanhado. (Brazil and Portugal)
    • English equivalent: It’s better to be alone than in bad company.
  • Amigos amigos, negócios à parte.’’
    • English equivalent: In trade there are no friends, nor are there enemies.
  • Amor, fogo, e tosse, A seu dono descobre.
    • English equivalent: Love, smoke and cough are hard to hide.
    • Cherchez la femme.
    • “Find the woman.” Alexandre Dumas, Les Mohicans de Paris (1854), Volume III, Chapter X, 
  • Amor verdadeiro, não envelhece.
    • English equivalent: True love never rusts.
  • Ajuda-te que Deus te ajudará.
    • English equivalent: Heaven help those who help themselves.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Segíts magadon, Isten is megsegít.
    • “When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition.”
  • A sorte favorece os audazes.
    • Translation: Luck favours the bold.
    • Origin: Latin Virgil Audentes fortuna juvat Wikipedia
  • A pressa é inimiga da perfeição.
    • English equivalent: Haste makes waste.
  • A mentira tem perna curta.
    • English equivalent: Lies have short legs..
  • Antes de mil anos todos seremos brancos.
    • English equivalent: It will all be the same a hundred years hence.
    • “Trivial problems or mistakes of the present moment have no lasting significance or effect, so there is no point in worrying about them.”
  • Até ao lavar dos cestos é vindima.
    • English Equivalent: Never say die.
    • “Do not anticipate the end of something; specifically, do not give up hope until you have actually lost or failed.”
  • Ao bom varão, terras alheias pátria são.
    • English equivalent: Great minds agree.
  • Ao homem amado a fortuna lhe dá a mão.
    • English equivalent: Fortune favors the bold.
    • “Those who act boldly or courageously are most likely to succeed.”
  • As paredes têm ouvidos.
    • English equivalent: The walls have ears.
    • “What you say may be overheard; used as a warning.”
  • A noite é boa conselheira.
    • English equivalent: The pillow is a good advisor.
  • A verdade é clara e a mentira sombra.
    • English equivalent: Truth gives a short answer, lies go round about.
    • Quidquid præcipies esto brevis.
    • “Whatever advice you give, be short.” Horace, Ars Poetica (18 BC), CCCXXXV. Reported in Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 10-11.
    • “You do so love to talk in riddles. Do you do that, I wonder as a substitute for having anything interesting to say?” Dan Houser, Michael Unsworth and Christian Cantamessa, Read Dead Redemption (2010)
  • Bem sabe mandar quem bem sabe obedecer.
    • Translation: He who has not obeyed, cannot command.
    • English equivalent: Who has not served cannot command.
    • Meaning: One must have been controlled in the same situation one wishes to properly control others.
  • Boca de mel, coração de fel.
    • English equivalent: A honey tongue and a heart of gall.
    • Note: A hypo proverb of Beware of wolves in sheep’s clothing…
  • Bom exemplo e boas razões avassalam os coracões.
    • English equivalent: Lead by example.
  • Cada cabelo faz sua sombra na terra.
    • English equivalent: A bad bush is better than no shelter; Every hair casts its shadow; There is no little enemy.
  • Cada carneiro por seu pé pende.
    • English equivalent: Each sheep hangs by it’s own foot.
    • Meaning: We must depend on ourselves, financially and in all other matters.
  • Cada coisa a seu tempo.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes, God disposes.
    • “Plans are insulted destinies. I don’t have plans, I only have goals.” Ash Chandler, Freudian Slip, Mumbai Mirror Buzz, April 2006.
  • Cão que ladra não morde.
    • Translation: Barking dog doesn’t bite.
    • Meaning: People who only talk aren’t dangerous.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • Meaning: People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
  • Conforme a pergunta, assim a resposta. Tal voz, tal eco.
    • English equivalent: Just as one calls into the forest, so it echoes back.
    • Meaning: Do not expect friendly reply when being obnoxious.
    • Meaning: Bad language may have other causes than innate bad character.
  • Como canta o abade, assim responde o sacristão.
    • Translation: As the abbot sings, so the sacristan responds.
    • Meaning: Children will become like older generations.
  • Como me medires assim te medirei.
    • English equivalent: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
    • English equivalent: What goes around comes around.
  • De amigo reconciliado e de caldo requentado, nunca bom bocado.
    • English equivalent: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
    • “Life being what it is, one dreams of revenge.” Paul Gauguin, Avant et Après (1903), from Paul Gauguin’s Intimate Journals, trans. (1923) Van Wyck Brooks [Dover, 1997, ISBN 0-486-29441-2], p. 2.
  • De boas intenções está o Inferno cheio.
    • Translation: Hell is full of good intentions.
    • English Equivalent: The road to Hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: A pokolba vezető út jóindulattal van kikövezve.
  • De boi manso me guarde Deus, que de mau eu me guardarei.
    • English equivalent: A man’s worst enemies are often those of his own house.
  • De casta vem ao galgo ter o rabo longo.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
  • De grandes ceias estão as sepulturas cheias.
    • English equivalent: Gluttony kills more than the sword.
  • De maus costumes nascem boas leis.
    • English equivalent: Good laws have sprung from bad customs.
    • “Most things were constructed or established for a purpose, and it is unwise to dismantle or destroy them unless you are certain that they are no longer required”. Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs.
  • De noite todos os gatos são pardos.
    • English equivalent: At night all cats are grey.
  • Dê ao Diabo o que é dele.
    • English equivalent: Give the devil his due.
    • Sansa Stark: You’re awful.
      Sandor Clegane, “The Hound”: I’m honest. It’s the world that’s awful.” George R.R. Martin, A Clash of Kings, (1998)
  • Debaixo de bom saio está o homem mau.
    • English equivalent: Judge not a man and things at first sight.
    • “No good Book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first.” Thomas Carlyle, Essays, “Novalis” (1829)
  • Deitar cedo e cedo erguer dá saúde e faz crescer.
    • Translation: Early sleep and early wake up, gives health and makes you grow.
    • Ironic variant rarely used: Deitar cedo e cedo erguer dá saúde e faz sono. ([…] and makes you sleepy.)
    • English Equivalent: Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
    • Meaning: “A lifestyle that involves neither staying up late nor sleeping late is good for body and mind and leads to financial success.”
  • Deus dá do seu bem.
    • English equivalent: He who serves God has a good master.
    • “The greatest weakness of all weaknesses is to fear too much to appear weak.”
  • “Diz-me com quem andas, dir-te-ei que manhas tens.
    • English equivalent: A man is known by the company he keeps.
  • Do contado come o lobo.
    • English equivalent: Cats eat what hussies spare.
    • “What a person tries to keep back through meanness is just as likely to be wasted anyway.”
  • Do mal, o menos.
    • English equivalent: Of two evils choose the least.
  • Do néscio às vezes bom conselho.
    • English equivalent: A fool may give a wise man counsel.
    • “Even as the fingers of the two hands are equal, so are human beings equal to one another. No one has any right, nor any preference to claim over another. You are brothers.” Muhammad, The Last Sermon of Muhammad delivered on the Ninth Day of Dhul Hijjah 10 A.H (c. 630 AD)
  • È frequente o riso, na boca de quem não tem siso.
    • English equivalent: A fool is ever laughing.
  • Em boca fechada as moscas não têm entrada.
    • Translation: Into a closed mouth no flies ever entered.
    • English equivalent: A close mouth catches no flies.
    • Meaning: It is wise not to speak when it is not necessary.
  • Em casa de ferreiro o pior apeiro.
    • English equivalent: Cobblers’ children are worst shod.
  • Em terra de cegos, quem tem um olho é rei.
    • English equivalent: Among the blind, the one-eyed is king.
    • “People of only limited capability can succeed when surrounded by those who are even less able than themselves.”
  • Entre marido e mulher não se mete a colher.
    • Translation: Between husband and wife, one doesn’t put the spoon.
    • Variant: Entre marido e mulher não metas a colher.
    • English Equivalent: Don’t go between the dog and the tree.
  • Enquanto há vida, há esperança.
    • Translation: While there’s life, there’s hope.
  • É de pequenino que se torce o pepino.
    • Translation: It’s when it’s small that the cucumber gets warped.
    • Meaning: Bad habits acquired during early life last long; Children should learn good habits from a tender age.
    • English Equivalent: Soon crooks the tree that good gambrel would be.
  • Falar, falar não enche barriga.
    • English equivalent: Fine words butter no parsnips.
    • Meaning: Merely talking about a problem will not solve it.
  • Fazei-vos mel, comer-vos-ão as moscas.
    • English equivalent: He that makes himself an ass must not take it ill if men ride him.
    • Meaning: Other people will abuse you, if you let them.
  • Fazer da necessidade virtude.
    • English equivalent: Make a virtue out of necessity.
    • “The best way to handle an undesirable situation is to turn it to your advantage.”
  • Génio e figura, até à sepultura.
    • English equivalent: What is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh.
    • Meaning: You can seldom change core human nature with the help of logic.
  • Guarda moço, acharás velho.
    • English equivalent: Diligent youth makes easy age.
    • Meaning: If you live your youth years diligently, it will save you from regret when you are old. That is, you do things you like that virtually only young people can do; It will be all the things you never did which you will regret.
  • Gostos não se discutem.
    • Translation: You don’t discuss tastes.
    • English Equivalent: There is no accounting for taste.
  • Hoje por mim, amanhã por ti.
    • Translation: Today for me, and tomorrow for you.
    • English equivalent: Today me, tomorrow thee.
  • Homem apercebido , meio combatido.
    • English equivalent: Forewarned is forearmed.
  • Huim roim se toma com outro roim.
    • English equivalent: Set a thief to catch a thief.
  • Longe dos olhos, longe do coração. (can also be Longe da vista (sight), longe do coração)
    • Translation: Far from the eyes, far from the heart.
    • English Equivalent: Out of sight, out of mind.
    • Variation: O que os olhos não vêem, o coração não sente. (What the eyes don’t see, the heart doesn’t feel.)
  • Mais vale andar só que mal acompanhado.
    • Translation: It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.
    • English equivalent: Better be alone than in bad company.
  • Mais vale tarde do que nunca.
    • Translation: Delayed is preferable to never.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Jobb későn, mint soha.
    • Meaning: “It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all.”
  • Mal me querem as comadres porque lhes digo as verdades.
    • English equivalent: All truths are not to be told.
  • Mais vale saber que haver e dar que receber.
    • English equivalent: A good mind possesses a kingdom.
    • “Most writers enjoy two periods of happiness – when a glorious idea comes to mind and, secondly, when its published and you don’t realize how much better it ought to be.” J. B. Priestley in International Herald Tribune, January 3, 1978.
  • Mais vale um pássaro na mão do que dois a voar. (Portugal)
  • Mais vale um pássaro na mão do que dois voando. (Brazil)
    • Translation: A bird in the hand has more worth than two flying.
    • English Equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Jobb ma egy túzok, mint holnap egy veréb.
    • Meaning: “Something you have for certain now is of more value than something better you may get, especially if you risk losing what you have in order to get it.”
  • Mais vale tarde do que nunca.(Portugal)
  • Antes tarde do que nunca. (Brazil)
    • Translation: Better late than never.
    • English Equivalent: Better late than never.
  • Mais vale pão duro que nenhum.
    • English equivalent: Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
  • Mais vale prevenir do que remediar. (Portugal)
  • É melhor prevenir do que remediar. (Brasil)
    • Translation: It’s best to prevent than to have to remedy (or fix).
    • English Equivalent: Better safe than sorry; An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
  • Mãos beija o homem que quisera ver cortadas.
    • English equivalent: Many kiss the hand they wish to see cut off.
  • Melhor é curar goteira, que casa inteira.
    • English equivalent: A stitch in time saves nine.
    • “No one needs to be told that a vast deal of labor is expended unnecessarily. This is occasioned, to a great extent, by the neglect of seasonable repairs.”
  • Mete a mão em teu seio, não dirás do fado alheio.
    • English equivalent: Forget other faults remembering your own; Forgive and forget.
  • Mil amigos, pouco; um inimigo, demais.
    • Translation: Thousand friends, little, an enemy, too much.
    • English equivalent: Do not think that one enemy is insignificant, or that a thousand friends are too many.
    • “A man cannot be too careful in his choice of enemies. I have not got one who is a fool. They are all men of some intellectual power, and consequently they all appreciate me.” Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891)
  • Muita palha e pouco grão.
    • English equivalent: Much bran and little meal.
    • Meaning: “Much ado about nothing.”
  • Não fies, nem porfies, nem filho doutro cries.
    • English equivalent: Diffidence is the right eye of prudence.
    • Meaning: Diffidently pondering something will often lead to a sensible solution.
  • Não chore sobre o leite derramado.
    • Translation: Don’t cry over spilt milk.
    • English equivalent: There is no use crying over spillt milk.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Késő bánat, eb gondolat.
  • Não faças nada sem consultar a almofada.
    • English equivalent: Take counsel of one’s pillow.
  • Não há galinha gorda por pouco dinheiro.
    • Translation: there are no fat chicken for little money (for cheap).
    • Meaning: there are no big bargains. Be suspicious otherwise.
    • English Equivalent: The only free cheese is in the mouse trap.
  • Não há duas sem três.
    • Translation: There’s no two without a three.
    • Meaning: If it happened twice, it will happen again.
    • English equivalent:
  • Não há glória sem inveja.
    • English equivalent: Envy always shoots at a high mark.
  • Não há pior cego que o que não quer ver.
    • English equivalent: There are no worse blinds than those who do not want to see.
  • Não há pior surdo que o que não quer ouvir.
    • English equivalent: None so deaf as those who will not hear.
  • Não há regra sem excepção.
    • Translation: There exists no rule without exceptions.
    • English equivalent: There is no rule without an exception.
  • Não deixes para amanhã o que podes fazer hoje.
    • Translation: Don’t leave for tomorrow what you can do today.
    • Hungarian equivalent: Amit ma megtehetsz, ne halaszd holnapra.
  • Não se atiram pedras senão às árvores que têm fruto.
    • Translation: Rocks are only thrown at the trees who bear fruit.
    • English equivalent: People throw stones only at trees with fruit on them.
    • “It is the practice of the multitude to bark at eminent men, as little dogs do at strangers.” Seneca the Younger, Of a Happy Life (1990)
  • Não se caçam lebres tocando tambor.
    • English equivalent: Drumming is not the way to catch a hare.
    • Meaning: Don’t expect anyone to change his ways by scolding him.
  • Não se muda de cavalo no meio de banhado.
    • Translation: Horses are not to be changed in the middle of the current.
    • Note: When in water it is ardous to mount and dismount.
    • English equivalent: Don’t change horses in midstream.
    • Meaning: It is often wise not to quit an undertaking already begun.
  • Nem tudo que reluz é ouro.
    • Variant: Nem tudo o que brilha é ouro.
    • Translation: Not everything that shines is gold.
    • English equivalent: All that glitters is not gold.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Nem mind arany, ami fénylik.
    • Meaning: An attractive appearance may be deceptive. It may cover or hide a much less favourable content.
  • Nunca Deus fecha uma porta que não abra outra.
    • English equivalent: When one door closes another opens.
    • Meaning: “When baffled in one direction a man of energy will not despair, but will find another way to his object.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 67.
  • O passarinho ama o seu ninho.
    • English equivalent: The bird loves her own nest.
  • Os cães ladram mas a caravana passa.
    • Translation: Dogs bark, but the caravan keeps on.
    • “Woe to you, when all men shall speak well of you! for so did their fathers to the false prophets.” The Bible ◄ Luke 6: 26 ►,
  • Onde se ganha o pão, não se come a carne.
    • Where you earn your bread, you don’t eat the meat.
    • Meaning: Different segments of your life must remain contiguous, such as your love life, business and leisure.
    • English Equivalent: You don’t shit where you eat.
  • Onde vai mais fundo o rio, aí faz menos ruído.
    • English equivalent: Still waters run deep.
  • O que os olhos não vêem, o coração não sente.
    • Translation: What the eyes don’t see the heart doesn’t feel.
    • English Equivalent: Out of sight, out of mind.
    • Variation: Longe dos olhos, longe do coração. (Far from the eyes, far from the heart.)
  • O que se aprende no berço sempre dura.
    • Translation: Old habits die hard.
  • O barato sai caro.
    • Variant: O que é barato sai caro.
    • Translation: What is cheap is costly.
    • Meaning: The cheap things prove to be expensive at the end.
    • English Equivalent: If you buy cheaply, you pay dearly.
  • Ouro é o que ouro vale.
    • English equivalent: Everything is worth its price.
  • Paciência excede sapiência.
    • Translation: With patience you go beyond knowledge.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of patience is worth a pound of brains.
    • Meaning: Patience can often do more than your wits.
  • Pior é ter mau médico que estar enfermo.
    • English equivalent: The remedy is often worse than the disease; Burn not your house to rid it off the mouse.
    • “Action taken to put something right is often more unpleasant or damaging than the original problem.”
  • Primeiro a obrigação, depois a devoção.
    • English Equivalent: Business before pleasure.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Előbb a munka, aztán a szórakozás.
    • “We may, indeed, indulge in sport and jest, but in the same way as we enjoy sleep or other relaxations: only when we have satisfied the claims of our earnest, serious task.”
    • Cicero, On Duties (44 B.C.)
  • Qual é Maria, tal filha cria.
    • Translation: Mary will foster a daughter like herself.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
  • Quando o bem te chegar, mete-o em casa.
    • English equivalent: Opportunity knocks only once.
  • Quem conta um conto, acrescenta um ponto.
    • Translation: Who tells a tale adds on a little.
    • Gallop, Rodney (1994). Portugal: A Book of Folk-ways (CUP Archive ed.). p. 267.
    • Variant translation: “he who tells a tale, adds a detail”. Leal, Ondina Fachel (1989). The Gauchos. University of California, Berkeley. p. 127.
  • Quem espera, desespera.
    • English equivalent: He that lives on hope will die fasting.
    • “The most manifest sign of wisdom is a continual cheerfulness: her state is like that of things in the regions above the moon, always clear and serene.”
    • Michel de Montaigne, Essays, Book I, Chapter XXV
  • Quem ama o Beltrão, ama seu cão (irmão).
    • Translation: He who loves Beltrão, loves his dog (brother).
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my dog.
    • Meaning: If you love someone, you like virtually everything about him.
  • Quem não pode como quer, queira como pode.
    • English equivalent: Do as you may, if you can’t do as you could.
  • Quem se afoga, às palhas se agarra.
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
  • Quem tem telhado de vidro não atira pedras [no telhado do vizinho]. (Portugal)
  • Quem tem telhado de vidro não joga pedra [no telhado do vizinho]. (Brazil)
    • English equivalent: People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.
    • “I am not a critic; to me criticism is so often nothing more than the eye garrulously denouncing the shape of the peephole that gives access to hidden treasure.” Djuna Barnes, in “The Songs of Synge : The Man Who Shaped His Life as He Shaped His Plays”, in New York Morning Telegraph (18 February 1917).
  • Quem muito abarca pouco abraça.
    • Translation: He who grasps at too much loses everything.
    • English Equivalent: Grasp all, lose all.
  • Quem não arrisca não petisca.
    • Translation: He who doesn’t take a chance won’t nibble.
    • Meaning: If you don’t try, or take the risk, you can’t have any profit.
    • English Equivalent: Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Aki nem játszik, az nem is nyer.
    • Meaning: It is necessary to take risks in order to achieve something.
  • Quem não quer ser lobo não lhe vista a pele.
    • Translation: He who doesn’t want to be a wolf shouldn’t wear it’s hide.
    • Meaning: If you don’t want to be treated like a [something], don’t act like one.
  • Quem está no convento é que sabe o que lhe vai dentro.
    • Translation: [Only] He who is in the convent knows what goes on inside.
    • English equivalent: No one knows where the shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
    • Meaning: “Nobody can fully understand another person’s hardship or suffering.”
  • Quem boa cama faz nela se deita.
    • Translation: He who makes a good bed sleeps on it.
    • Meaning: You reap what you sow.
    • Alternative meaning: You did a good thing, now use it.
    • English Equivalent: As you make your bed, so you must lie in it.
  • Quem quando pode não quer, quando quer não pode.
    • English equivalent: He that will not when he may, when he will he may have nay.
    • Meaning: “Take advantage of an opportunity when it presents itself, even if you do not want or need it at the time, because it may no longer be available when you do.”
  • Quanto mais depressa mais devagar.
    • Translation: the faster, the slower.
    • Variation: Quantas mais pressas mais vagares.
    • Usage: About things made fast (or in haste) that end up being done slower than usual.
    • English Equivalent: Make haste slowly.
  • Quando a esmola é demais, até o santo desconfia.
    • Translation: When the alms is too large, even a saint will be suspicious.
    • English equivalent: When something seems too good to be true, usually it is.
    • Variation: Quando a esmola é muita, o pobre desconfia.
      • Translation: When the alms is too much, the poor will be suspicious.
    • Variant: Quando a esmola é grande o santo desconfia.
  • Quem o pássaro quer tomar, não o há-de enxotar.
    • English equivalent: Deal gently with the bird you mean to catch.
    • When people are just, they need friendship in addition. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (c. 325 BC), Book VIII, 1155.a26
  • Quem segura a enguia pelo rabo e a mulher pela palavra, pode dizer que nada segura.
    • English equivalent: You might as well try to hold an eel by the tail.
    • Meaning: Don’t take a man by his word.
  • Quem vê cara não vê coração.
    • Translation: He who looks at the face doesn’t see the heart.
    • Variant: Quem vê caras não vê corações. (Port.)
    • Translation: He who sees faces doesn’t see hearts.
    • Meaning: You can’t know what goes inside people by just looking.
    • English Equivalent: You can’t tell a book by its cover.
  • “Ri melhor quem ri por último.”
    • English equivalent: Let those laugh who win.
  • Se caçares, não te gabes; se não caçares, não te enfades.
    • English equivalent: If fortune favours, beware of being exalted; if fortune thunders, beware of being overwhelmed.
    • “If a man’s fortune does not fit him, it is like the shoe in the story; if too large it trips him up, if too small it pinches him.” Horace, Epistles, I. 10. 42. (14 BCE)
  • Se Maomé não vai à montanha, a montanha vai a Maomé.
    • Translation: If Mohammad won’t go to the mountain, the mountain will go to Mohammad.
    • English equivalent: If the mountain will not come to Mohammed, Mohammed must go to the mountain.
    • Meaning: “If you cannot get what you want, you must adapt yourself to the circumstances or adopt a different approach.”
  • Quem não quer ser lobo não lhe vista a pele.
    • Translation: He who doesn’t want to be a wolf shouldn’t wear it’s hide.
    • Meaning: If you don’t want to be treated like a [something], don’t act like one.
  • Serve o senhor e saberas o que é dor.
    • English equivalent: A king’s favour is no inheritance.
  • Sol que muito madruga, pouco dura.
    • English equivalent: Early ripe, early rotten.
    • Meaning: Precocious children will mean much trouble later on.
  • Tal pai, tal filho.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
  • Tal tronco, tal acha.
    • English equivalent: You must meet roughness with roughness.
    • Example: If someone treats you poorly, you should treat him equally poorly.
  • Tarde dar e negar estão a par
    • English equivalent: He gives twice, who gives in a trice.
  • Tempo e maré, não esperam por ninguém.
    • English equivalent: Time and tide waits for no man.
    • Meaning: “Take, for illustration, the case of the negligent and unreflecting man. He resolves to accomplish a certain important object at some future period; but in the intervening time, some preparatory, though in itself comparatively trifling business, is indispensable. He defers this business; […] At length the period for accomplishing the ultimate object arrives: but, alas! the prerequisite, so absolutely connected and essential, is neglected And then, vain man!
  • Uma ovelha má põe o rebanho a perder.
    • Translation: A bad sheep puts the herd to waste.
    • Meaning: A bad person can influence many others to behave in a bad way.
    • English Equivalent: one bad apple ruins the bunch.
  • Um homem prevenido vale por dois.
    • Translation: A forewarned man is worth two (men).
    • English Equivalent: Forewarned is forearmed.
    • See: Homem prevenido vale por dois.
  • Uma desgraça nunca vem só.
    • Translation: a misfortune never comes alone.
    • English equivalent: Misery loves company.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: A baj nem jár egyedül.
  • Vassoura nova varre sempre bem.
    • English equivalent: New brooms sweep clean.
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
  • Vai muito do dizer ao fazer.
    • Translation: There’s a long way from saying to doing.
    • English Equivalent: Easier said than done.
  • Vida sem amigo, morte sem castigo.
    • English equivalent: Without friendship life is nothing.
    • Mathis: “Surround yourself with human beings, my dear James. They are easier to fight for than principles.”
      He laughed. “But don’t let me down and become human yourself. We would lose a wonderful machine.” Ian Fleming, Casino Royale (1953)
  • Voz do povo, voz de Deus.
    • Translation: The people’s voice is God’s voice.
    • Meaning: You had better heed when many people gather spontaneously about some cause.
    • Meaning: The voices of gossipers in the marketplace are God’s own
    • Meaning: what you can hear here and there is unquestionable because everybody is saying it.
  • A necessidade é a mãe da invenção
    • Meaning: This means necessity is the mother of invention i.e. the adverse circumstances make you creative and enable you to dig out creative solutions for your needs.
  • Passarinho que come pimenta sabe o cu que tem
    • Meaning: The bird that eats peppers knows his own ass. You should keep yourself ready to face the consequences of what you have done.
  • O pior cego é aquele que não quer ver
    • Meaning: One who doesn’t want to see is the blindest of the blind. In many organizations, you may find some people who are sycophant. They shut their eyes to the hide the truth just for their own benefits.
  • Não se come a carne onde se ganha o pão
    • Meaning: One shouldn’t eat meat where one earns his bread. In Portuguese language, the words pao and carne have symbolism. Pão means “bread” and “loaf” too. It is countable. It means also “food” in general. “Carne” means “meat” (for eating) and “flesh” (in a religious and metaphorical sense). People from Japan, China and Korea can recognize the metaphor if they replace bread for rice.
    • This is a very whimsical proverb that plays on the religious implications of the words for stating a very humdrum saying: that you should not take a lover for a co-worker.
    • You should remember that the word “comer” (to eat) comes with double meanings: in informal slang it means to have sex.
  • As paredes têm ouvidos
    • Meaning: The walls have ears. This phrase is used as a warning. It means what you say may be overheard.
  • Armar-se em carapau de corrida
    • English: He’s like a racing mackerel
      Meaning: The mackerel is not exactly a noble fish. So a racing mackerel – a mackerel who’s swimming faster than the others – is a person who thinks he’s a big shot but, in fact, is a nobody.
  • Águas passadas não movem moinhos
    • English: Past waters don’t power mills
      Meaning: Mills are usually located and powered by rivers. The water that has passed the mill will not make it work again. So this means that you shouldn’t worry about things of the past.
  • De pequenino é que se torce o pepino
    • English: From very small the cucumber is bent
      Meaning: Farmers cultivate their cucumbers from the moment they start to grow so to give them the proper, best shape. If this isn’t done in an early stage, the cucumber will not be as good. So the expression is meant to express that certain traits, skills, characteristics are practiced in an early stage of our lives, during our childhood.
  • Quem não tem cão, caça com gato.
    • English: Those who don’t have a dog, hunt with a cat.
      Meaning: Actually, the original saying was ‘caça como gato’, meaning ‘hunts like a cat’. Dogs help humans in their hunting, but cats are lone hunters. The saying originally meant that those who do not have a companion to do what they need should go on doing it alone. Eventually, the language distorted the saying and today the expression is used to mean that those who are not in possession of the necessary means to do what they need should find other means. Like a Portuguese McGuyver.
  • De Espanha, nem bom vento nem bom casamento.
    • English: From Spain, neither good winds nor good marriage [will come].
      Meaning: This is very related to our history. As a small country, Portugal has always suffered the impacts of having a rather large, sometimes more powerful neighbour. Naturally, the ‘marriages’ bit refers to the number of failed or simply tragic marriages between crowns. As for the winds, it is meant to explain that winds coming from the East are usually bad winds, either very cold or very hot, depending on the season.
  • Demasiada areia para o meu camião.
    • English: This is too much sand for my truck.
      Meaning: It means you’re probably taking a task that you can’t handle, that it’s too exhausting or demanding of you or you simply have no knowledge of it whatsoever.
  • Fia-te na virgem e não corras…
    • English: Trust the virgen and don’t run…
      Meaning: This is said with a very sarcastic tone. It is usually said at people who, for example, are in trouble but do nothing to come out of trouble. As if they are waiting for a miracle, people say this meaning they shouldn’t trust a miracle from the virgin and in fact do run.
  • Dá Deus nozes a quem não tem dentes.
    • English: God gives nuts to those who don’t have teeth.
      Meaning: When things are given to someone who cannot appreciate or give good usage to the things they are given.
  • Em casa onde não há pão, todos berram e ninguém tem razão.
    • English: In a house with no bread, everyone screams and nobody is right.
      Meaning: Hunger makes people lose their reason, so in a household where food is lacking, everyone argues for no reason. The expression is commonly used for other situations where something is lacking and an argument settles.
  • O hábito faz o monge
    • English: The habit makes the monk
      Meaning: People sometimes used the opposite: o hábito não faz o monge (the habit DOESN’T make the monk). Meaning someone is easily defined by what they wear.
  • Para bom entendedor, meia-palavra basta.
    • English: To an understanding person, half a word is enough.
      Meaning: For someone who can easily comprehend others, they don’t need the overall picture or situation to understand the full picture.
  • Agora é tarde e Inês morta.
    • English: Now it’s late and Inês is dead.
      Meaning: Yes, this is an expression. It refers to the famous Inês de Castro, and her immortalized love story with D. Pedro I. Inês was a handmaiden of Pedro’s wife, Constança, who fell in love with so intensely he claimed (although never proven) to have married her in secrecy. His father, Afonso IV, terrified of a union between Portuguese and Spanish crown (the Castros were a noble Spanish family) had Inês murdered, which eventually raised a war between father and son. Legend says that Pedro had the Portuguese nobles kiss the dead body of Inês after he exhumed her body to crown her Queen of Portugal. The expression is usually used when something has no hope. Like when you try to solve something that has no possible solution anymore.
  • Não ponhas o carro à frente dos bois!
    • English: Don’t put the bulls in front of the carriage!
      Meaning: Used as a warning to someone who is acting to excited on something that is not certain. You cannot put the bulls before the carriage as it won’t move, considering it is the bulls that pull the carriage. We usually say that’you’re putting the bulls before the carriage’ when you’re acting without predicting or ahead of things. Another variation is “Não lances os foguetes antes da festa” (don’t throw fireworks before the party).
  • Pior a emenda que o soneto.
    • English: Worst the corrections than the sonnet.
      Meaning: The story of this proverb dates back to the infamous Portuguese poet Maria Manuel Barbosa du Bocage. Story has it a poet asked Bocage to read his poem and make some corrections. Bocage agreed but the next day, when the other poet came back, Bocage had done no alterations. So he said to him that the poem was so bad there was no correction possible, and if he did make some alterations, the poem would actually become worse. The meaning of the proverb is that sometimes when something is indeed terrible, it will do much worse to try and correct it, and it is better to start from scratch.
  • Foi de cavalo para a burro.
    • English: He went from horse to donkey.
      Meaning: Usually said when someone downgrades. When someone makes a decision that is considerably worse than their previous condition (like changing to a worse college, moving to a worse house, start wearing ugly clothes) we say you went from riding on a horse to a donkey. The donkey, of course, was not a nobility’s ride back in the day, hence the downgrade.
  • De bem intencionados está o inferno cheio.
    • English: Hell is filled with well-intentioned.
      Meaning: Usually said at someone who is trying to justify a wrongdoing or an overall bad action through the doer’s well intentions. It means that no matter how well intentioned someone might be, it is still a bad action and thus one to be taken to hell (this is the type of expression that is very typical of catholic countries)
  • Tira o cavalo da chuva.
    • English: Move your horse out of the rain.
      Meaning: In the 19th century, when nobles did quick visits to someone’s house, their horses would wait outside. But if it happened to take too long and it started raining, their horses would then be moved inside to this sort of horse-garage that existed in these buildings. When someone tells someone else to ‘take their horse out of the rain’ it means that might just wait because whatever they are waiting for is not going to happen.
  • Onde Judas perdeu as botas.
    • English: Where Judas lost his boots.
      Meaning: When Judas denounced Jesus to Pilatos’ troops, he saved the money he got as a reward in his boots, and when he hung himself, he was found with no boots. So the soldiers searched extensively for his boots, but never found him. We usually say this for example when we lose something or referring to a place we don’t know where it is.
  • Quem vê cara não vê coração.
    • Literal meaning: “Who sees face does not see heart.”
    • Meaning: Do not judge a book by its cover.
    • A person might look or seem unattractive or boring on the outside but have a fantastic heart. For those moments, we might use this expression in Portuguese.
    • For example, if a friend of yours rejects a potential date based on how they look, you might say Quem vê cara não vê coração.
    • However, much more often Portuguese speakers will use this expression with the opposite meaning and a negative connotation—just because somebody looks rich, powerful, attractive and friendly, does not mean their heart is aligned with the rest!
    • As human beings, we sometimes tend to trust people we should not—especially if they look particularly sweet, innocent, rich or successful! This expression is often used as cautionary advice when one sees a person they care about place way too much trust or value in someone else’s image.
    • Other expressions that have a similar meaning are Aparências enganam” (“Appearances deceive”) and Nem tudo o que reluz é ouro (“Not everything that shines is gold”). These are also used when a person is attracted to an opportunity that seems shiny and promising, but is way too blind to see the risks!
    • By the way, if you find yourself in Portugal, this expression will often be heard in its plural version: “Quem vê caras não vê corações.”
    • Example: “Você diz que ela parece uma pessoa fantástica, mas eu digo que quem vê cara não vê coração.” (“You say she looks like a fantastic person, but I say that those who see a face do not see a heart.”)
  • Quem não arrisca não petisca.
    • Literal meaning: “Those who do not risk, do not have a snack.”
    • Meaning: If you do not take a risk, you will not get the benefits.
    • Looking for a new job, but feel too unprepared to try applying?
    • Not quite sure whether you should change your major halfway through the semester for something more satisfying?
    • Dreaming of participating in a talent show, contest or event, but fear you might make a fool out of yourself?
    • Portuguese speakers have a saying for these occasions!
    • Usually used as advice to somebody who is in doubt on whether they should make a risky move, such as changing careers, moving abroad or even just dating somebody new, Quem não arrisca não petisca means you should definitely make that move.
    • Indeed, you will never get a sim (yes) if you do not even try, right?
    • Example: “Você deveria pedir um aumento de salário! Quem não arrisca não petisca!” (“You should ask for a raise! Those who don’t risk it, don’t have a snack!”)
  • Aqui se faz, aqui se paga.
    • Literal meaning: “Here it is done, here it is paid.”
    • Meaning: Bad actions lead to bad karma.
    • In need of some revenge? Oh, have we got a good one for you!
    • Also known in Portugal as “Cá se fazem, cá se pagam” (“here they are done, here they are paid”), this expression is usually used when we come to know that somebody who hurt us or hurt somebody we know had a misfortune in life or got what they deserved.
    • If you hear this expression immediately after the person saying it has been hurt, it is probably a promise of revenge.
    • Example: “Eu bem disse que um dia ela iria sofrer as consequências pelo que fez. Aqui se faz, aqui se paga!” (“I did say that one day she would suffer the consequences for what she had done. Here it is done, here it is paid!”)
  • Cada macaco no seu galho.
    • Literal meaning: “Each monkey to its own branch.”
    • Meaning: Each person should be responsible for a particular task, function or topic, and not interfere with other people’s work or life when they are not asked to.
    • If you are tired of those nosy neighbors, sick of your colleagues giving you unsolicited advice or fed up with your brother claiming it is your turn to do the dishes when it clearly is not, use this phrase.
    • Usually used when boundaries seem unclear, it is time to say it out loud: “Cada macaco no seu galho!”
    • You might hear this expression more often in relation to business and work, but it can also sometimes be used in relationships when one sees boundaries are lacking and the situation seems to be all over the place.
    • When one individual is messing with another person’s business, it is time to tell the monkeys were they belong!
    • Example: “Não quero que controlem o meu trabalho. Eu sou do departamento de marketing, vocês são do departamento de contabilidade. Cada macaco no seu galho!” (“I don’t want people controlling my work. I am from the marketing department, you are from the accounting department. Each monkey to its own branch!”)
  • Mais vale um pássaro na mão do que dois voando.
    • Literal meaning: “It is worth more to have one bird in hand than two flying.”
    • Meaning: It is better to successfully retain one good thing than to lose two or more options due to being greedy.
    • At one time or another, all of us have to make difficult choices.
    • And sometimes it feels like for every good thing that comes along, we are presented with something that might be even better and forced to choose.
    • Usually spoken as advice when somebody is tempted to risk one opportunity in order to later get benefits that are not certain yet, this expression is used to warn somebody against being greedy. For instance, someone who decides to cheat on their spouse risks losing both loves!
    • Anybody who uses this expression clearly prefers safety to risk, and will often tell you it is better to choose one thing and stick with it, rather than risk losing both.
    • Be careful! This expression also exists in Portugal, but you will often hear it as “Mais vale um pássaro na mão do que dois a voar,” since the present continuous is very different in Brazilian and European Portuguese.
    • Example: “Não pode mais esperar para aceitar essa oportunidade só porque está esperando a outra. Mais vale um pássaro na mão do que dois voando!” (“You cannot take any longer to accept this opportunity, just because you are waiting for the other one. It is better to have one bird in your hand than two flying!”)
  • Quem ri por último ri melhor.
    • Literal meaning: “He who laughs last laughs best.”
    • Meaning: Watch out for the consequences of your bad actions.
    • Some people just seem to get on our nerves when they act in selfish ways and hurt others in their carelessness. Some might even do it on purpose!
    • When you use this expression, you mean these people should be careful because the one who gets revenge at the last moment will be in the best situation… and we all know by now that “Aqui se faz, aqui se paga!”
    • Make sure to use this expression only when talking to very close friends about a third person to express anger, and always be careful when using this directly to someone’s face—it is often interpreted as promising revenge!
    • Example: “Ele pensa mesmo que pode fazer isso e não sofrer nenhuma consequência? Não se esqueça que quem ri por último ri melhor!” (“He really thinks that he can do that and not suffer any consequence? Do not forget that the one who laughs last, laughs best!”)
  • Cão que ladra não morde.
    • Literal meaning: “Dog that barks does not bite.”
    • Meaning: Usually, the people who are the loudest, most obnoxious, threatening or arrogant are the ones who do not have the guts to actually take action.
    • If you have ever felt intimidated by your boss, your arrogant neighbor, a controlling friend or just an unpleasant person on the street, know that a dog that barks usually does not bite!
    • At least, that is what Portuguese speakers sometimes say.
    • This expression could be used either to calm somebody down after they have been confronted by an aggressive or unpleasant person, or directly as a way of mocking somebody who is acting arrogant and threatening.
    • Example: “Não tenha medo dele. Ele sempre fala desse jeito, mas não faz nada. Cão que ladra não morde.” (“Do not be afraid of him. He always speaks that way, but he doesn’t do anything. Dog that barks does not bite.”
  • É melhor prevenir do que remediar.
    • Literal meaning: “It is better to prevent than to mend.”
    • Meaning: It is always better to avoid a problem by being careful than having to solve it afterwards.
    • Remember “Quem não arrisca, não petisca?” Well, what if you do not believe taking risks is a positive thing?
    • Perhaps you are the type of person who prefers safety and comfort over taking unnecessary risks. In that case, we have an expression for you, too: “É melhor prevenir do que remediar!”
    • This is usually used as advice to somebody who is taking a risk that could be avoided, or proudly used by oneself after doing something clever that could avoid future problems.
    • A variation may include “Antes prevenir do que remediar,” literally “Before to prevent than to mend.”
    • Example: “Decidi procurar seguro. É melhor prevenir do que remediar!” (“I decided to seek insurance. It is better to prevent than to mend!”)
  • A mentira tem pernas curtas.
    • Literal meaning: “The lie has short legs.”
    • Meaning: Lies do not go far—they are easily discovered and exposed.
    • Is a family member or friend confessing they have told a lie and do not want to be discovered?
    • Have you come to know that a colleague at work is lying to everybody?
    • Then now is the time to say “A mentira tem pernas curtas.” After all, truth is often uncovered sooner or later, so we might as well just avoid lies.
    • This expression is usually used either to advise somebody not to lie after they have confessed that intention to us, or immediately after uncovering a lie.
    • Example: “Eu sabia que estava escondendo alguma coisa! Você esqueceu? A mentira tem pernas curtas!” (“I knew you were hiding something! Did you forget? The lie has short legs!”)
  • Para bom entendedor, meia palavra basta.
    • Literal meaning: “To a good ‘understander,’ half a word is enough.”
    • Meaning: Clever people do not need everything to be told directly to them—they are sensible enough to realize and understand situations without an obvious explanation.
    • If you have ever felt tempted to talk too much or oversimplify things, this saying is for you.
    • It is used to advise somebody not to oversimplify the message when the audience is clever, or to pay attention to something that might not be said directly but might easily be understood by an intelligent bystander.
    • The irony? When people use this expression, they usually leave it incomplete on purpose. They will say “Para bom entendedor…” and not actually finish, which is quite interesting considering the message.
    • That is because if you are knowledgeable and clever, you will already know what follows!
    • Example: “Não precisa explicar tudo para ela. Nem terminou a frase e ela já sabe o que você quer. Para bom entendedor, meia palavra basta.” (“You don’t need to explain everything to her. You haven’t even finished your sentence and she already knows what you want. To a good ‘understander,’ half a word is enough.”)
  • Quem não arrisca, não petisca
    • The equivalent in English: Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
    • Literally Meaning: “He who does not risk it, does not snack”, which does not make much sense when translated this way, but it rhymes in Portuguese so it works perfectly! What does this proverb mean? It simply means that if a person is not adventurous, doesn’t take any actions or doesn’t take any risks, he may lose the opportunity to reach his goals.
  • Mais vale um passarinho na mão do que dois a voar
    • Translation: One bird in the hand is more worthy than two flying birds.
    • The equivalent in English: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • For this proverb, we compare the value of one bird with two birds. Two birds would normally be more valuable than just one, because there’s two of them! But if one has to choose between one bird they already have and the possibility of catching two that are still flying, it is advised to stick with the one they already possess rather than risking to lose it because they were too greedy trying to catch the two others. It is uncertain we will be able to catch the two flying birds.
    • Meaning: What this proverb intends to say is that it is wiser to value reliability over uncertainty, facts over hypothesis, reality over promises. It is advised to cherish what we already have, even though it is less valuable, rather than to risk losing it for something that is not secure.
  • Na cama que farás, nela te deitarás
    • Translation: In the bed which thou shalt make, thou shalt lie therein.
    • The equivalent in English: As you make your bed, so you must lie on
    • This popular Portuguese proverb wants to remind us that all our actions have consequences. The way we build our present will have an impact on our future. A bed that is poorly made won’t provide an health sleep, while a well done bed will allow you to have a pleasant and restful night.
    • Meaning: If one is responsible, careful day by day, they won’t get bad surprises in the future. Our present actions determine the success of the outcoming situations.
  • Quem brinca com fogo, queima-se
    • Translation: “Those who play with fire will get burnt” or also commonly known as “instant karma”.
    • Meaning: This proverb simply means that if one exposes themselves to danger, they may suffer severe consequences. For instance, if you provoke an animal, it might attack you for self defense. Animals are unpredictable human beings. This is why we have to respect them and leave them be.
  • Em terra de cego, quem tem olho é rei
    • Translation: In the land of the blind, the eye is king
    • The equivalent in English: Among the blind, a one-eyed man is king.
    • While the majority of people is distracted, doesn’t care about important issues or does not pay attention to details, the one person that manages to identify a good opportunity will be at an advantage!
    • Meaning: My second interpretation about this proverb is about opening people’s eyes. For instance, while the vast majority of people are blinded by media or by the industries, if one person digs a little deeper, gets informed, they will be more aware of the world we live in. A great example is, for example, veganism. While most of people still believe that eating animals does not harm the planet, vegan people are informed and understand that a plant-based diet is much more beneficial for the earth.
  • De pequenino é que se torce o pepino
    • Translation: The little one twists the cucumber
    • In English, it can be translated as “Of teeny of it twists the cucumber”.
    • Farmers that cultivate cucumbers need to give the best shape to these plants for them to grow in the best conditions. To stimulate cucumbers growth and development, farmers need to cut cucumbers edges at a certain time of the year. If the pruning of cucumbers is not made, cucumbers won’t grow as expected and will taste funny. This is the origin of the proverb “de pequenino é que se torce o pepino“. 
    • Meaning: This proverb can be used for many situations. It can be related to children education, because we shape children personality and education while they’re still young, when they’re still “little cucumbers”. But it can also be applied for someone who’s beginning a new project or a new activity, because no one begins at the top. Everyone starts from the bottom!
  • Águas passadas não movem moinho
    • Translation: Past waters do not move mill
    • English expressions: “it’s just water under the bridge”, “let bygones be bygones” or “what’s done is done”. In Portuguese, we have a proverb to express this idea. It is very old and is used for people who want to overcome the past and move on with their lives. In Portugal, we say “águas passadas não movem moinho“, which means that past waters don’t move the mill.
    • Meaning: This proverb refers to the mechanism of a water mill that functions thanks to the water that goes through it. The water only moves the mill while it’s there. Once it passes, it only serves for functioning the movement of the mill. This proverb is a very deep one, because it expresses the idea that all that’s past won’t change the present, which means that whoever lives in the past, ends up not enjoying the present and building the future. The morale of the proverb “águas passadas não movem moinho” is that holding on to the past won’t bring you any good.
  • Mãos frias, coração quente
    • Translation: Cold hands, warm heart
    • The equivalent in English: A cold hand, a warm heart.
    • Meaning: When someone has cold hand, they can be perceived as being a cold-hearted person, when in reality, they have a good heart and are very friendly. Cold-handed persons are the best friends and lovers! I always tease people with this proverb.

Portuguese Proverb

Portuguese Proverbs and Translation

  • Mais vale prevenir do que remediar. 
    • It’s best to prevent than to have to remedy.
      English Equivalent: Better safe than sorry; An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
  • Não fies, nem porfies, nem filho doutro cries.
    • Diffidence is the right eye of prudence.
      Meaning: Diffidently pondering something will often lead to a sensible solution.
    • Mais vale andar só que mal acompanhado.
      It is better to be alone than to be in bad company. 
  • Não chore sobre o leite derramado.
    • Don’t cry over spilt milk.
      English equivalent: There is no use crying over spilt milk.
  • Mais vale um pássaro na mão do que dois a voar.
    • Translation: A bird in the hand has more worth than two flying.
      English Equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
  • Quem está no convento é que sabe o que lhe vai dentro.
    • [Only] she who is in the convent knows what goes on inside.
      English Equivalent: No one knows where the Shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
      Meaning: Only people going through a problem know how it is.
  • Quem o pássaro quer tomar, não o há-de enxotar.
    • Idiomatic translation: Deal gently with the bird you mean to catch.
  • Digas com quem andas e eu te direi quem és
    • Translation: Tell me who you are and I’ll tell you who you are
      English Equivalent: A man is judged by the company he keeps. Perfect for a quick toast when out with friends.
  • Alegria de uns, tristeza de outros
    • Translation: One man’s happiness is another man’s sadness.
  • Antes só do que mal acompanhado 
    • Translation: Better alone than in bad company. – 
  • Cavalo dado não se olha os dentes
    • Translation: Do not look a gift horse in the mouth
  • Faça como eu digo e não como eu faço.
    • Translation: Do as I say, not as I do.
  • Quem ri por último, ri melhor.
    • Translation: He who laughs last, laughs best.
  • Quem dá recebe.
    • Translation: Give and you shall receive.
  • Quem ama o feio, bonito lhe parece.
    • Translation: Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
  • O amor é cego.
    • Translation: Love is blind.

Funny Portuguese Idioms and Phrases

  • Ir com os porcos
    • Translation: Go with the pigs
      Meaning: To pass away, die
  • Pulga atrás da orelha
    • Translation: Flea behind the ear
      Meaning: To look/feel suspicious
  • Queimar as pestanas
    • Translation: Burn the eyelashes
      Meaning: To read a lot
  • Barata tonta
    • Translation: Silly cockroach
      Meaning: To be clumsy, silly, scared, disoriented
  • Acordar com os pés de fora
    • Translation: Wake up with the feet outside
      Meaning: Wake up in a bad mood, to be grumpy
  • Estar com os azeites
    • Translation: Be with the olive oils
      Meaning: To be in a bad mood, irritated, angry
  • Muitos anos a virar frangos
    • Translation: Many years turning chickens
      Meaning: Someone who has a lot of experience
  • Macaquinhos na cabeça
    • Translation: Have little monkeys in the head
      Meaning: To have reason to be suspicious or distrust
  • Vai pentear macacos!
    • Translation: Go comb monkeys!
      Meaning: To tell someone to get lost, or drop dead.
  • Engolir sapos
  • Translation: Swallow frogs
    Meaning: To do something you don’t want to do
  • Tirar o cavalinho da chuva
    • Translation: Take the horse from the rain
      Meaning: Don’t hold your breath! Don’t count on it!
  • Partir a loiça toda
    • Translation: Breaking all the dishes
      Meaning: To be amazing, used when someone has exceeded expectations
  • Chatear camões
    • Translation: Go bother Camões
      Meaning: Go bother someone else, bugger off
  • Água pela barba
    • Translation: Water in the beard
      Meaning: Something that requires a lot of work
  • Ter muita lata
    • Translation: A lot of cans
      Meaning: To have a lot of nerve
  • Pão pão queijo queijo
    • Translation: Bread bread, cheese cheese
      Meaning: It is what it is, to call a spade a spade
  • À sombra da bananeira
    • Translation: Under the shade of a Banana Tree
      Meaning: No worries
  • Cabeça d’Alho Chocho
    • Translation: A head of dry garlic
      Meaning: To de distracted
  • Estou-me nas tintas
    • Translation: I’m in the inks
      Meaning: I don’t give a damn.
  • Estás aqui estás a comer!
    • Translation: You’re here to eat!
      Meaning: If you don’t behave, I’ll slap you
  • Estás a meter água
    • Translation: You’re letting water in
      Meaning: To make a fool of yourself
  • Macacos me mordam!
    • Translation: Monkeys are biting me!
      Meaning: To be intrigued or surprised
  • Dá Deus nozes a quem não tem dentes
    • Translation: God gives nuts to those who don’t have teeth
      Meaning: What a waste! Used when an opportunity isn’t seized
  • Falar pelos cotovelos
    • Translation: To speak by the elbows
      Meaning: To speak too much, talk nineteen to the dozen
  • João sem braço
    • Translation: John without arms
      Meaning: To play dumb

Portuguese Proverb

Portuguese Words and Phrases

  • audade
    • Without a doubt one of the most beautiful words in the world, saudade symbolizes a mixture of a few emotions: longing, melancholy, incompleteness, and love. The word holds a lot of weight, and saudade can apply to a person, place, or another time.
    • “I feel saudades for Lisboa.”
  • Apaixonar
    • Apaixonar signifies the action of falling in love and the feeling of falling in love. It’s like saying, “I’m in that place of falling in love.”
  • Gostosa
    • The literal translation is “delicious,” but gostosa can mean “super attractive.” To call a woman gostosa is saying that she is sexy or hot.
  • Desabafar
    • Every once in a while, people need to vent or let off steam. In Portuguese, the word desabafar is used to express a need to talk about problems or forget about it in another way (running, walking, drinking, etc.).
  • Mágoa
    • Mágoa means to feel hurt physically or emotionally, sadness, grief, and/or sorrow.
  • Lindeza
    • Lindeza is a term to describe someone; it can mean niceness and/or prettiness. It’s more than physical beauty.
  • Combinado
    • The word combinado translates to “combined” but is really a confirmation that something has been arranged. It’s the term used after making plans. For example, after someone states a plan of action, simply saying “combinado!” can mean “ok!”.
  • Espelhar
    • Espelho is the Portuguese word for “mirror,” so espelhar is the word for “to mirror” or “to copy” and can also mean “reflect.” Removing the “r” at the end of the word and replacing it with –mento is the same as appending –ing in English, thereby, creating the word espelhamento, which translates to “mirroring” or “copying.”
  • Fado
    • In Portuguese culture, fado is the name for a traditional form of music. What many people don’t realize is that it also means fate and destiny, something that is supposed to happen no matter what actions occur beforehand
  • Águas passadas, não movem moinhos
    • Idioms are beautiful in every language, and this Portuguese idiom literally translates to “water under the bridge do not move mills.” In English, this phrase is like saying “what’s done is done.”
  • Beijinho
    • When the Portuguese greet someone or say goodbye, they kiss one another on each cheek. Beijinho is a combination of beijo (meaning kiss) and the suffix –inho (which symbolizes little or cute), meaning “little kiss,” and represents that action but can be used to finish an email or text message in place of “goodbye.”
  • Pois é
    • Pois é is a positive confirmation that is usually injected into a conversation. It’s also something people say when they don’t know what else to say.
    • “It’s a beautiful day out. Pois é.”
  • Engraçado/a
    • Engraçado/a is an adjective that can be used for a person, place, or thing. Calling someone engraçado (or engraçada, when referring to a female or a feminine word) is definitely positive, but it can mean attractive, funny, cool, or any other compliment.
  • Fofo
    • When something is fofo, it is cute or soft. A puppy or a child can both be fofo. Adding –inho to the end of the word, like fofinho, adds an element that represents extra cute or cuddly.
  • Desenrascanço
    • To disentangle oneself from an undesirable situation is to desenrascanço.
  • Cafuné
    • Cafuné is the one word on this list that’s more Brazilian than European Portuguese, and it represents the loving action of petting, caressing, or simply running fingers through hair (or fur, when petting an animal).

Portuguese Proverb

Expressions and Proverbs about the Weather in Portuguese

Now that outono, fall, has arrived in the hemisfério norte, northern hemisphere, it is primavera, spring, in Brazil and other countries in the hemisfério sul, southern hemisphere. 

But no matter what part of the world you live in, one thing is for sure, once a new estação, season, arrives, everybody starts talking about the tempo, weather. So here are some common expressions in Brazilian Portuguese to help you join in.

Palavras (Words)

calor, heat / chuva, rain / frio, cold / gelo, ice / granizo, hail

inverno, winter / lua, moon / nublado, overcast / neve, snow

nuvem, cloud / névoa, fog / tempestade, storm / trovão, thunder / relâmpago, lightning / sol, sun  temperatura, temperature /  vento, wind / tempo, weather / verão, summer

Expressões (Expressions)

Como está o tempo? How’s the weather?

Qual a temperatura? What’s the temperature?

Está calor/frio. It’s hot/cold.

Está ensolarado, chovendo, nevando. It’s sunny, raining, snowing.

Qual a previsão do tempo para hoje? What’s today’s weather forecast?

Que tempo vai fazer amanhã? What’s the weather going to be like tomorrow?

Amanhã vai fazer sol com pancadas de chuvas isoladas à tarde. Tomorrow is going to be sunny with isolated rain showers in the afternoon.

Sábado vai amanhecer com nevoeiro mas vai clarear à tarde. Saturday morning is going to be foggy but it is going to clear out in the afternoon.

A umidade relativa do ar será de oitenta e um por cento. The relative humidity is going to be 80%.

Os voos foram cancelados por causa de intensa neblina. Flights were cancelled due to intense fog.

Notice that most weather forecasts use vai+infinitive of the verb (going to + infinitive).

Amanhã vai fazer tempo bom? Sim, amanhã vai estar ensolarado o dia todo. Não vai chover. Is the weather going to be nice tomorrow? Yes, tomorrow is going to be sunny all day. It is not going to rain.

Provérbios e ditos populares sobre o tempo Proverbs and sayings about the weather

Está chovendo canivetes. The same meaning as it’s raining cats and dogs. Literally it’s raining jackknives. 

Quem sai na chuva é para se molhar. If you take risks, you’ll suffer the consequences.

Não adianta tapar o sol com a peneira. You can’t conceal something that is evident.

Quem semeia ventos, colhe tempestades. Similar meaning to you sow what you reap. Literally, He who sows winds, reaps storms.

Depois da tempestade vem a bonança. After the storm comes the calm.

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