Spanish Proverbs

Spanish proverbs are a subset of proverbs that are used in Western cultures in general; there are many that have essentially the same form and content as their counterparts in other Western languages. Proverbs that have their origin in Spanish have migrated to and from English, French, Flemish, German and other languages.

Many Spanish proverbs have a long history of cultural diffusion; there are proverbs, for example, that have their origin traced to Babylon and that have come down to us through Greece and Rome; equivalents of the Spanish proverb “En boca cerrada no entran moscas” (Silence is golden) belong to the cultural tradition of many north-African countries as far as Ethiopia; having gone through multiple languages and millennia, this proverb can be traced back to an ancient Babylonian proverb.

A collection of Spanish Proverbs to inspire you. Wise Spanish Sayings in the form of proverbs that have been passed down for generations. Proverbs from all Spanish-speaking parts of the whole world.

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Spanish Proverbs

“If the devil is going to take me,” said the courtesan, “let it be in a coach.” – Spanish Proverb

A bad compromise is better than a successful suit. – Spanish Proverb

A bad day never hath a good night. – Spanish Proverb

A bad excuse is better than none. – Spanish Proverb

A bad labour, and a daughter after all. – Spanish Proverb

A bad man’s gift is like his master. – Spanish Proverb

A bad mother wishes for good children. – Spanish Proverb

A bad thing never dies. – Spanish Proverb

A barking dog was never a good biter. – Spanish Proverb

A beard well lathered is half shaved. – Spanish Proverb

A beautiful wife without money is like a fine house without furniture. – Spanish Proverb

A bespattered hog tries to bespatter another. – Spanish Proverb

A blind man’s stroke, which raises a dust from beneath water. – Spanish Proverb

A blind man’s wife needs no paint. – Spanish Proverb

A blow from a frying-pan, if it does not hurt, smuts. – Spanish Proverb

A blow with a reed makes a noise but hurts not. – Spanish Proverb

A blustering night, a fair day follows. – Spanish Proverb

A boaster and a liar are cousins. – Spanish Proverb

A boy’s love is water in a sieve. – Spanish Proverb

A buffeting threatened is never well given. – Spanish Proverb

A bully is always a coward. – Spanish Proverb

A buxom widow must be married, buried, or cloistered. – Spanish Proverb

A capon eight months old is fit for a king’s table. – Spanish Proverb

A change is as good as a rest. – Spanish Proverb

A child of a year old sucks milk from the heel. – Spanish Proverb

A constant guest is never welcome. – Spanish Proverb

A covetous abbot for one offering loses a hundred. – Spanish Proverb

A cracked bell will never be sound. – Spanish Proverb

A crazy vessel never falls from the hand. – Spanish Proverb

A creaking door hangs longest. – Spanish Proverb

A daily guest is a thief in the kitchen. – Spanish Proverb

A day of fasting is the eve of a feast. – Spanish Proverb

A day without bread lasts long. – Spanish Proverb

A determined heart will not be counselled. – Spanish Proverb

A devotee’s face, and a cat’s claws. – Spanish Proverb

A dog does not always bark at the front gate. – Spanish Proverb

A dog won’t bite you if you are carrying a stick. – Spanish Proverb

A donkey decked in gold is better than an over-laden horse. – Spanish Proverb

A fair-weather friend changes with the wind. – Spanish Proverb

A fast day is the eve of a feast day. – Spanish Proverb

A father’s love, for all other is air. – Spanish Proverb

A few germs never hurt anyone. – Spanish Proverb

A fifth wheel to a cart is but an encumbrance. – Spanish Proverb

A fool and his money are soon parted. – Spanish Proverb

A fool is someone who trusts another fool. – Spanish Proverb

A fool sometimes gives good counsel. – Spanish Proverb

A fool who knows Latin is never a real fool. – Spanish Proverb

A fool, if he holds his tongue, passes for wise. – Spanish Proverb

A fool, unless he know Latin, is never a great fool. – Spanish Proverb

A fortress on its guard is not surprised. – Spanish Proverb

A fortunate man may be anywhere. – Spanish Proverb

A friend in need is a friend indeed. – Spanish Proverb

A friend to everybody and to nobody is the same thing. – Spanish Proverb

A friend to everybody is a friend to nobody. – Spanish Proverb

A full belly is neither good for flight, nor for fighting. 

A gentle breeze blowing in the right direction is better than a pair of strong oars. – Spanish Proverb (Canary Islands)

A girl draws more than a rope. – Spanish Proverb

A good grievance is better than bad payment. – Spanish Proverb

A good heart breaks bad fortune. – Spanish Proverb

A good hope is better than a bad possession. – Spanish Proverb

A good lawyer is a bad neighbour. – Spanish Proverb

A good life defers wrinkles. – Spanish Proverb

A good life is the best sermon. – Spanish Proverb

A good life, they say, keeps wrinkles at bay. – Spanish Proverb

A good listener is a silent flatterer. – Spanish Proverb

A good man’s pedigree is little hunted up. – Spanish Proverb

A good name covers theft. – Spanish Proverb

A good payer will not object to leaving a deposit. – Spanish Proverb

A good paymaster is keeper of other men’s purses. – Spanish Proverb

A good paymaster needs no security. – Spanish Proverb

A good thing lost is a good thing valued. – Spanish Proverb

A good word extinguishes more than a pailful of water. – Spanish Proverb

A grain does not fill a sieve, but it helps its fellow. – Spanish Proverb

A grand eloquence, little conscience. – Spanish Proverb

A great lance-thrust to a dead Moor. – Spanish Proverb

A great leap gives a great shake. – Spanish Proverb

A great man’s entreaty is a command. – Spanish Proverb

A great position entails great responsibility. – Spanish Proverb

A guest and a fish stink in three days. – Spanish Proverb

A hair casts its shadow on the ground. – Spanish Proverb

A handful of motherwit is worth a bushel of learning. – Spanish Proverb

A handsome hostess is bad for the purse. – Spanish Proverb

A handsome man is not quite poor. – Spanish Proverb

A handsome woman is either silly or vain. – Spanish Proverb

A hangman is a good trade, he doth his work by daylight. – Spanish Proverb

A hidden fire is discovered by its smoke. – Spanish Proverb

A house filled with guests is eaten up and ill spoken of. – Spanish Proverb

A house ready built and a vineyard ready planted. – Spanish Proverb

A hundred tailors, a hundred millers, and a hundred weavers, are three hundred thieves. – Spanish Proverb

A hundred years hence we shall all be bald. – Spanish Proverb

A hungry belly listens to no one. – Spanish Proverb

A hungry man discovers more than a hundred lawyers. – Spanish Proverb

A hungry man is an angry man. – Spanish Proverb

A husband with one eye rather than with a son. – Spanish Proverb

A kitchen-dog is never a good rabbit-hunter. – Spanish Proverb

A lame goat will not sleep by day. – Spanish Proverb

A lawsuit for a maravedi consumes a real’s worth of paper. – Spanish Proverb

A lazy ox is little the better for the goad. – Spanish Proverb

A lazy youth, a lousy age. – Spanish Proverb

A little gall embitters much honey. – Spanish Proverb

A little loss frightens, a great one tames. – Spanish Proverb

A little spark kindles a great fire. – Spanish Proverb

A little thing in hand is worth more than a great thing in prospect. – Spanish Proverb

A long tongue betokens a short hand. – Spanish Proverb

A looker on sees more of the game than a player. – Spanish Proverb

A lot of weeds will grow in a stagnant pond. – Spanish Proverb

A malicious man is like a coal sack — black on the outside and even blacker inside. – Spanish Proverb

A man forewarned is as good as two. – Spanish Proverb

A man gains nothing by vain glory but contempt and hatred. – Spanish Proverb

A man in love schemes more than a hundred lawyers. – Spanish Proverb

A man may hap to bring home with him what makes him weep. – Spanish Proverb

A man may learn wit every day. – Spanish Proverb

A man may lose his goods for want of demanding them. – Spanish Proverb

A man that has had his fill is no eater. – Spanish Proverb

A man that is lean, not from hunger, is harder than brass. – Spanish Proverb

A man too busy to take care of his health is like a mechanic too busy to take care of his tools. – Spanish Proverb

A man who prides himself on his ancestry is like the potato plant, the best part of which is underground. – Spanish Proverb

A man without honor smells worse than a corpse. – Spanish Proverb

A measly hog infects the whole sty. – Spanish Proverb

A melon and a woman are hard to know. – Spanish Proverb

A meowing cat is never a good mouse catcher. – Spanish Proverb

A mewing cat is never a good mouser. – Spanish Proverb

A miss is as good as a mile. – Spanish Proverb

A moneyless man goes fast through the market. – Spanish Proverb

A monkey remains a monkey, though dressed in silk. – Spanish Proverb

A morsel eaten selfishly does not gain a friend. – Spanish Proverb

A mule and a woman do what is expected of them. – Spanish Proverb

A mute bird makes no omen. – Spanish Proverb

A north wind has no corn, and a poor man no friend. – Spanish Proverb

A peasant between two lawyers is like a fish between two cats. – Spanish Proverb

A peasant will stand on the top of a hill for a very long time with his mouth open before a roast duck will fly in. – Spanish Proverb

A peck of March dust is worth a king’s ransom. – Spanish Proverb

A penny spared is a penny saved. – Spanish Proverb

A person who talks a lot is bound to be right sometimes. – Spanish Proverb

A person who talks a lot is sometimes right. – Spanish Proverb

A pig bought on credit grunts all the year. – Spanish Proverb

A pig bought on credit is forever grunting. – Spanish Proverb

A pig’s tail will never make a good arrow. – Spanish Proverb

A poor man is all schemes. – Spanish Proverb

A Portuguese apprentice who can’t sew, yet would be cutting out. – Spanish Proverb

A postern door makes a thief. – Spanish Proverb

A pound of care will not pay a pound of debt. – Spanish Proverb

A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience. – Spanish Proverb

A reconciled friend is a double enemy. – Spanish Proverb

A rich man is either a scoundrel or the heir of a scoundrel. – Spanish Proverb

A rich man’s foolish sayings pass for wise ones. – Spanish Proverb

A rolling stone gathers no moss. – Spanish Proverb

A rose too often smelled loses its fragrance. – Spanish Proverb

A rule isn’t unfair if it applies to everyone. – Spanish Proverb

A scabby colt may make a good horse. – Spanish Proverb

A secret between two is God’s secret, a secret between three is everybody’s. – Spanish Proverb

A sharp tooth for hard bread. – Spanish Proverb

A shock dog is starved and nobody believes it. – Spanish Proverb

A shoemaker’s wife and a smith’s mare are always the worst shod. – Spanish Proverb

A short halter for a greedy horse. – Spanish Proverb

A short horse is soon curried. – Spanish Proverb

A sick man sleeps, but not a debtor. – Spanish Proverb

A soft answer turneth away wrath. – Spanish Proverb

A solitary ox shits more than a hundred swallows. – Spanish Proverb

A son-in-law and a pig will show you the way only once. – Spanish Proverb

A son-in-law’s friendship is a winter’s sun. – Spanish Proverb

A sooty chimney costs many a beef-steak. – Spanish Proverb

A sparrow in the hand is better than a bustard on the wing. – Spanish Proverb

A spot shows most on the finest cloth. – Spanish Proverb

A strong attack is half the battle won. – Spanish Proverb

A tree often transplanted neither grows nor thrives. – Spanish Proverb

A true gentleman would rather have his clothes torn than mended. – Spanish Proverb

A turn of the key is better than the conscience of a friar. – Spanish Proverb

A turtle makes progress when it sticks its neck out. – Spanish Proverb

A well-wisher sees from afar. – Spanish Proverb

A wise man changes his mind, a fool never will. – Spanish Proverb

A wolf’s mourning is the fox’s feast. – Spanish Proverb

A woman and a glass are always in danger. – Spanish Proverb

A woman’s advice is of little value, but he who does not take it is a fool. – Spanish Proverb

A woman’s belly is a garden with many fruits. – Spanish Proverb

A woman’s place is in the home. – Spanish Proverb

A woman’s tears and a log’s limping are not real. – Spanish Proverb

A woman’s tears are worth a lot, but cost little. – Spanish Proverb

A word and a stone let go cannot be recalled. – Spanish Proverb

A word and a stone once launched cannot be recalled. – Spanish Proverb

A word from the mouth is like a stone from a sling. – Spanish Proverb

A word from the mouth, a stone from a sling. – Spanish Proverb

A young woman is to an old man the horse that he rides to hell. – Spanish Proverb

Abbot of Carcuela, you eat up the pot and ask for the pipkin. – Spanish Proverb

About the King and the Inquisition, hush. – Spanish Proverb

Absence is a foe to love; away from the eyes, away from the heart. – Spanish Proverb

Absence makes the heart grow fonder. – Spanish Proverb

Absent, none without blame; present, none without excuse. – Spanish Proverb

Abundance of things engenders disdainfulness. – Spanish Proverb

According to the custom of Aragon, good service, bad guerdon. – Spanish Proverb

Actions speak louder than words. – Spanish Proverb

Advise no one to go to war or to marry. – Spanish Proverb

After a thrifty father, a prodigal son. – Spanish Proverb

After breaking my head you bring plaister. – Spanish Proverb

After dinner rest a while, after supper walk a mile. – Spanish Proverb

After one vice a greater follows. – Spanish Proverb

After stuffing pears within, drink old wine until they swim. – Spanish Proverb

After the house is finished, he deserts it. – Spanish Proverb

After the vintage, baskets. – Spanish Proverb

Alas! father, another daughter is born to you. – Spanish Proverb

All are not soldiers who go to the wars. – Spanish Proverb

All do not beg for one saint. – Spanish Proverb

All griefs with bread are less. – Spanish Proverb

All in the way of joke the wolf goes to the ass. – Spanish Proverb

All is fair in love and war. – Spanish Proverb

All is not lost that is in danger. – Spanish Proverb

All mouth and no trousers. All talk and no action. – Spanish Proverb

All things are easy that are done willingly. – Spanish Proverb

All things of this world are nothing, unless they have reference to the next. – Spanish Proverb

All work and no play make Jack a dull boy. – Spanish Proverb

All’s fish that comes to the net. – Spanish Proverb

All’s for the best in the best of all possible worlds. – Spanish Proverb

All’s lost that’s put in a riven dish. – Spanish Proverb

All’s not lost that’s in danger. – Spanish Proverb

Always be patient with the rich and powerful. – Spanish Proverb

Always taking out and never putting in, soon reaches the bottom. – Spanish Proverb

An absent saint gets no candles. – Spanish Proverb

An ailing woman lives forever. – Spanish Proverb

An apple a day keeps the doctor away. – Spanish Proverb

An ass let him be who brays at an ass. – Spanish Proverb

An ass with her colt goes not straight to the mill. – Spanish Proverb

An empty stomach will not listen to anything. – Spanish Proverb

An inch in a sword, or a palm in a lance, is a great advantage. – Spanish Proverb

An oak is not felled at one blow. – Spanish Proverb

An oak is not felled at one stroke. – Spanish Proverb

An old ox makes a straight furrow. – Spanish Proverb

An old poacher makes the best gamekeeper. – Spanish Proverb

An open door tempts a saint. – Spanish Proverb

An ounce of blood is worth more than a pound of friendship. – Spanish Proverb

An ounce of mother is worth a pound of priests. – Spanish Proverb

An ounce of state to a pound of gold. – Spanish Proverb

An ounce of wit that’s bought Is worth a pound that’s taught. – Spanish Proverb

Anger and hate hinder good counsel. – Spanish Proverb

Anger is a short madeness. – Spanish Proverb

Another’s bread costs dear. – Spanish Proverb

Another’s care hangs by a hair. – Spanish Proverb

Any port in a storm. – Spanish Proverb

Appetite comes with eating. – Spanish Proverb

April and May make meal for the whole year. – Spanish Proverb

Arms and money require good hands. – Spanish Proverb

As are the times, so are the manners. – Spanish Proverb

As for friars, live with them, eat with them, and walk with them; then sell them as they do themselves. – Spanish Proverb

As is the king, so are his people. – Spanish Proverb

As is the master, so is his dog. – Spanish Proverb

As long as I was a daughter-in-law I never had a good mother-in-law, and as long as I was a mother-in-law I never had a good daughter-in-law. – Spanish Proverb

As mony heads, as mony wits. – Spanish Proverb

As soon as one goes out the window, another comes in the door. – Spanish Proverb

As the abbot sings the sacristan responds. – Spanish Proverb

As the best wine makes the sharpest vinegar, so the deepest love turns to the deadliest hatred. – Spanish Proverb

As the call, so the echo. – Spanish Proverb

As the day lengthens, so the cold strengthens. – Spanish Proverb

As you make your bed so you must lie upon it. – Spanish Proverb

As you sow, you shall reap. – Spanish Proverb

Ask for too much in order to get enough. – Spanish Proverb

Ask for too much so that you can get enough. – Spanish Proverb

Ask for too much so that you can get enough. – Spanish Proverb

Ask not after a good man’s pedigree. – Spanish Proverb

Ask too much to get enough. – Spanish Proverb

Associate with the good and you will be one of them. – Spanish Proverb

Assurance is two-thirds success. – Spanish Proverb

At an ambuscade of villains a man does better with his feet than his hands. – Spanish Proverb

At an auction keep your mouth shut. – Spanish Proverb

At her wedding, the bride eats the least. – Spanish Proverb (Catalonia)

At night all cats are grey. – Spanish Proverb

At the end the Gloria is chanted. – Spanish Proverb

At the game’s end we shall see who gains. – Spanish Proverb

At the wedding-feast the least eater is the bride. – Spanish Proverb

At twenty a man will be a peacock, at thirty a lion, at forty a camel, at fifty a serpent, at sixty a dog, at seventy a monkey, and at eighty nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Attack is the best form of defence. – Spanish Proverb

Avoid a friend who covers you with his wings and destroys you with his beak. – Spanish Proverb

Away with thee, sickness, to where they make a good pillow for thee. – Spanish Proverb

Bachelor, a peacock; betrothed, a lion; married, an ass. – Spanish Proverb

Bad news is always true. – Spanish Proverb

Bargains are dear. – Spanish Proverb

Be a custom good or bad, a peasant will have it continue in force. – Spanish Proverb

Be merry, Shrovetide, for to-morrow thou wilt be ashes. – Spanish Proverb

Be my enemy and go to my mill. – Spanish Proverb

Be not a baker if your head is butter. – Spanish Proverb

Be not an esquire where you were a page. – Spanish Proverb

Beads about the neck, and the devil in the heart. – Spanish Proverb

Bear and forbear. – Spanish Proverb

Beauty and chastity are always quarreling. – Spanish Proverb

Beauty draws more than oxen. – Spanish Proverb

Before the time, great courage; when at the point, great fear. – Spanish Proverb

Before you marry, beware, for it is a knot difficult to untie. – Spanish Proverb

Before you marry, have a house to live in, fields to till, and vines to cut. – Spanish Proverb

Beggars can’t be choosers. For a good appetite there is no hard bread. – Spanish Proverb

Beggars must not be choosers. – Spanish Proverb

Begin in other people’s way so as to end by having your own way. – Spanish Proverb

Better a friendly refusal than an unwilling consent. – Spanish Proverb

Better a good hope than a bad possession. – Spanish Proverb

Better a quiet death than a public misfortune. – Spanish Proverb

Better alone than in bad company. – Spanish Proverb

Better be the head of a rat than the tail of a lion. – Spanish Proverb

Better go about than be drowned. – Spanish Proverb

Better go about than fall into the ditch. – Spanish Proverb

Better have a bad ass than be your own ass. – Spanish Proverb

Better is rule than rent. – Spanish Proverb

Better is the smoke of my own house than the fire of another’s. – Spanish Proverb

Better joy in a cottage than sorrow in a palace. – Spanish Proverb

Better late than never. – Spanish Proverb

Better later than never. – Spanish Proverb

Better lose a supper than have a hundred physicians. – Spanish Proverb

Better one “Take this,” than two “I will give you.” – Spanish Proverb

Better one-eyed than stone blind. – Spanish Proverb

Better play at small game than stand out. – Spanish Proverb

Better rule in hell, than serve in heaven. – Spanish Proverb

Better sit idle than work for naught. – Spanish Proverb

Better suffer a known evil than change for uncertain good. – Spanish Proverb

Better there should be too much than too little. – Spanish Proverb

Better they should say, “There he ran away,” than “There he died.” – Spanish Proverb

Better to ask the way than to go astray. – Spanish Proverb

Better to bend than break. – Spanish Proverb

Better visit hell in your lifetime than after you’re dead. – Spanish Proverb

Between brothers, two witnesses and a notary. – Spanish Proverb

Between saying and doing there is a long road. – Spanish Proverb

Between smith and smith no money passes. – Spanish Proverb

Between the “yes” and “no” of a woman you can’t place a pin. – Spanish Proverb

Between the hand and the mouth the soup is lost. – Spanish Proverb

Between two friends a notary and two witnesses. – Spanish Proverb

Between two Saturdays happen many marvels. – Spanish Proverb

Between two sharpers, the sharpest. – Spanish Proverb

Between two stools one falls to the ground. – Spanish Proverb

Beware of a bad woman, and put no trust in a good one. – Spanish Proverb

Beware of a reconciled friend as of the devil. – Spanish Proverb

Birth is much, but breeding is more. – Spanish Proverb

Bleed him, purge him, and if he dies, bury him. – Spanish Proverb

Blessed are the dead that the rain rains on. – Spanish Proverb

Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. – Spanish Proverb

Blessings on him that said, Face about. – Spanish Proverb

Blood boils without fire. – Spanish Proverb

Blow, smith, and you’ll get money. – Spanish Proverb

Blue eyes say, Love me or I die; black eyes say, Love me or I kill thee. – Spanish Proverb

Books are hindrances to persisting stupidity. – Spanish Proverb

Brain is better than brawn. – Spanish Proverb

Buy from desperate people, and sell to newlyweds. – Spanish Proverb

Buy from people who are desperate, and sell to newlyweds. – Spanish Proverb

By always taking out and never putting in, the bottom is soon reached. – Spanish Proverb

By the street of “By-and-By” one arrives at the house of “Never.” – Spanish Proverb

By the thread we unwind the skein. – Spanish Proverb

Call me not fortunate till you see me buried. – Spanish Proverb

Call me not olive before you see me gathered. – Spanish Proverb

Call no man happy till he dies. – Spanish Proverb

Call not a surgeon before you are wounded. – Spanish Proverb

Carry bread in your hood to Don Garcia’s wedding. – Spanish Proverb

Changing one’s mind is more often a sign of prudence than of ignorance. – Spanish Proverb

Charity well regulated begins at home. – Spanish Proverb

Chastise one that is worthless, and he will presently hate you. – Spanish Proverb

Cheap things cost a lot of money. – Spanish Proverb

Cheat me in the price and not in the goods. – Spanish Proverb

Cheat me with the price, but not with the goods I buy. – Spanish Proverb

Cheese from the ewe, milk from the goat, butter from the cow. – Spanish Proverb

Children and fools speak the truth. – Spanish Proverb

Children and fools tell the truth. – Spanish Proverb

Chins without beards deserve no honor. – Spanish Proverb

Choose neither a woman nor linen by candlelight. – Spanish Proverb

Clay and lime conceal much evil. – Spanish Proverb

Cleaning a blot with blotted fingers maketh a greater. – Spanish Proverb

Cleanliness is next to godliness. – Spanish Proverb

Clergymen’s sons always turn out badly. – Spanish Proverb

Colts by falling, and lads by losing, grow prudent. – Spanish Proverb

Come fish, come frog, all goes into the basket. – Spanish Proverb

Come live with me and you’ll know me. – Spanish Proverb

Comes in at the end with a wet sail. – Spanish Proverb

Coming events cast their shadow before. – Spanish Proverb

Command your wealth, else that will command you. – Spanish Proverb

Communism is a cow of many; well milked and badly fed. – Spanish Proverb

Compare your griefs with those of other men and they will seem less. – Spanish Proverb

Compare your grieves with other men’s and they will seem less. – Spanish Proverb

Confide in a woman and a magpie if you want something to be broadcast. – Spanish Proverb

Conscience is what tells you not to do what you have just done. – Spanish Proverb

Copper begets copper, and not the labour of men’s bones. – Spanish Proverb

Corsair against corsair nothing is got but empty casks. – Spanish Proverb

Covetousness bursts the bag. – Spanish Proverb

Cow of many — well milked and badly fed. – Spanish Proverb

Coward against coward, the assailant conquers. – Spanish Proverb

Cowards die many times. – Spanish Proverb

Cuando amor no es locura, no es amor. – Spanish Proverb

Curses on accounts with relations. – Spanish Proverb

Curses, like chickens, always come home to roost. – Spanish Proverb

Curses, like chickens, come home to roost. – Spanish Proverb

Custom becomes law. – Spanish Proverb

Custom in infancy becomes nature in old age. – Spanish Proverb

Custom makes all things easy. – Spanish Proverb

Cut your coat according to your cloth. – Spanish Proverb

Cut your coat to suit your cloth. – Spanish Proverb

Dance to the tune that is played. – Spanish Proverb

Dead men have no friends. – Spanish Proverb

Death is the reaper who doesn’t take a midday nap. – Spanish Proverb

Debts are like children: the smaller they are the more noise they make. – Spanish Proverb

Deceive not thy physician, confessor, or lawyer. – Spanish Proverb

Deeds are love, and not fine phrases. – Spanish Proverb

Desire beautifies what is ugly. – Spanish Proverb

Desperation is the mistress of the impossible. – Spanish Proverb

Different strokes for different folks. – Spanish Proverb

Dine with arrogance, sleep with shame. – Spanish Proverb

Dios tarda pero no olvida — God delays but doesn’t forget. – Spanish Proverb

Discover not your silent money to anybody. – Spanish Proverb

Discreet stops make speedy journeys. – Spanish Proverb

Discretion is a way of hiding what you cannot help. – Spanish Proverb

Discretion is knowing how to hide that which we cannot remedy. – Spanish Proverb

Do not buy a carrier’s ass, or marry an innkeeper’s daughter. – Spanish Proverb

Do not fret for news, it will grow old and you will know it. – Spanish Proverb

Do not lose honour through fear. – Spanish Proverb

Do not rejoice at my grief, for when mine is old, yours will be new. – Spanish Proverb

Do not steal a loaf from him that kneads and bakes. – Spanish Proverb

Do not stuff your servant with bread, and he won’t ask for cheese. – Spanish Proverb

Do not talk Arabic in the house of a Moor. – Spanish Proverb

Do not tell your secrets behind a wall or a hedge. – Spanish Proverb

Do not throw a stone at the mouse and break the precious vase. – Spanish Proverb

Do not throw pearls to swine. – Spanish Proverb

Do what I say well, and not what I do ill. – Spanish Proverb

Do what is right, come what may. – Spanish Proverb

Do what the friar says, and not what he does. – Spanish Proverb

Do you carry the trough, husband, and I will carry the sieve, which is as heavy as the devil. – Spanish Proverb

Do you want to buy cheap? Buy of a needy fool. – Spanish Proverb

Do you want to see a wolf with young? Marry your daughter. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t believe what you see, but only what I tell you. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t bite off more than you can chew. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t leave for tomorrow that which you can do today. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t let anyone know about your silent [secret] money. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t sign a paper without reading it, or drink water without seeing it. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t speak unless you can improve on the silence. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t talk too much—your ignorance exceeds your knowledge. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t be afraid of a spot that can be removed with water. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t believe what you see, husband, but only what I tell you. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t bet more than you can afford to lose. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t bite off more than you can chew. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t call me a little olive until you’ve picked me. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t kill the man at the count’s desire. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t let anyone know about your secret money. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t offer me advice; give me money. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t refuse a wing to the one who gave you the chicken. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t scuffle with the potter, for he makes money by the damage. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t send away your cat for being a thief. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t sign a paper without reading it, or drink water without seeing it. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t speak unless you can improve on the silence. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t spoil the ship for a halfpenny-worth of tar. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t stop the way of a bull or of a current of air. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t take any wooden nickles. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t talk too much — your ignorance exceeds your knowledge. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t talk too much, because your ignorance is greater than your knowledge. – Spanish Proverb

Don’t worry if people call you ordinary — only if you are ordinary. – Spanish Proverb

Drink nothing with out seeing it; sign nothing without reading it. – Spanish Proverb

Drink wine upon figs. – Spanish Proverb

Dung is no saint, but where it falls it works miracles. – Spanish Proverb

Each of us must face our own responsibilities. – Spanish Proverb

Each person knows where problems lie. – Spanish Proverb

Each to his own and God watching over everyone. – Spanish Proverb

Early flowers give no seed. – Spanish Proverb

Eat, drink and be merry. – Spanish Proverb

Eating sets the head to rights. – Spanish Proverb

Either rich or hanged. – Spanish Proverb

Either the ass will die, or he that goads it. – Spanish Proverb

Either you sink or you swim. – Spanish Proverb

Elm trees have beautiful branches but hardly ever bear fruit. – Spanish Proverb

Enjoy your little while the fool seeks for more. – Spanish Proverb

Entreaties to get him to sing, and entreaties to leave off. – Spanish Proverb

Entreaty and right do the deed. – Spanish Proverb

Even a sugar mother-in-law tastes bitter. – Spanish Proverb

Even the best writer has to erase sometimes. – Spanish Proverb

Every cask smells of the wine it contains. – Spanish Proverb

Every cloud has a silver lining. – Spanish Proverb

Every cock crows on his own dunghill. – Spanish Proverb

Every cock is proud on his own dung hill. – Spanish Proverb

Every country has its custom. – Spanish Proverb

Every dog has its day. – Spanish Proverb

Every fool is pleased with his bauble. – Spanish Proverb

Every hair casts its shadow. – Spanish Proverb

Every law has its loophole. – Spanish Proverb

Every law is broken to become a king. – Spanish Proverb

Every man for himself and God for us all. – Spanish Proverb

Every man is a fool in some man’s opinion. – Spanish Proverb

Every man is the son of his own works. – Spanish Proverb

Every man should support himself, and not hang upon another. – Spanish Proverb

Every one feels the cold according as he is clad. – Spanish Proverb

Every one for himself, and God for us all. – Spanish Proverb

Every one in his own house, and God in all men’s. – Spanish Proverb

Every one is wise when the mischief is done. – Spanish Proverb

Every one knows best where the shoe pinches him. – Spanish Proverb

Every one sneezes as God pleases. – Spanish Proverb

Every one speaks of the fair as he himself finds it. – Spanish Proverb

Every one stretches his legs according to the length of his coverlet. – Spanish Proverb

Every one wishes to bring water to his own mill, and leave his neighbour’s dry. – Spanish Proverb

Every pedlar praises his own needles. – Spanish Proverb

Every person is a fool in some person’s opinion. – Spanish Proverb

Every potter praises his pot, especially if cracked. – Spanish Proverb

Every road leads to Rome. – Spanish Proverb

Every season brings its joy. – Spanish Proverb

Every woman has something of a witch about her. – Spanish Proverb

Everybody’s friends and nobody’s friend is all one. – Spanish Proverb

Everything in its season, and turnips in Advent. – Spanish Proverb

Evildoers always think the worst of others. – Spanish Proverb

Expect not at another’s hand what you can do by your own. – Spanish Proverb

Experience is not always the kindest of teachers, but it is surely the best. – Spanish Proverb

Faint heart never won fair lady. – Spanish Proverb

Fall sick, and you will see who is your friend and who not. – Spanish Proverb

Fancy surpasses beauty. – Spanish Proverb

Fast as the hare runs, the greyhound outruns her, since he catches her. – Spanish Proverb

Fate sends almonds to toothless people. – Spanish Proverb

Fear and love never eat from the same plate. – Spanish Proverb

Fear guards the vineyard. – Spanish Proverb

Fear the man of one book. – Spanish Proverb

Feed the raven and he’ll peck out your eyes. – Spanish Proverb

Feet that are used to move cannot remain quiet. – Spanish Proverb

Fine words butter no parsnips. – Spanish Proverb

Fire and love do not say “Go to your work.” – Spanish Proverb

Fire, fire, many pots on. and one pea in them all. – Spanish Proverb

First cobwebs, then chains. – Spanish Proverb

First come to the mill, first grind. – Spanish Proverb

Flattery makes friends and truth makes enemies. – Spanish Proverb

Flying from the bull he fell into the river. – Spanish Proverb

Folly is the most incurable of maladies. – Spanish Proverb

Folly is the product of all countries and ages. – Spanish Proverb

Fond of lawsuits, little wealth; fond of doctors, little health; fond of friars, little honour. – Spanish Proverb

Fond pride of dress is sure a very curse; Ere fancy you consult, consult your purse. – Spanish Proverb

Fools and bairns should never see half-done work. – Spanish Proverb

Fools and obstinate men make rich lawyers. – Spanish Proverb

Fools and the perverse fill the lawyers’ purse. – Spanish Proverb

Fools rush in where angels fear to tread. – Spanish Proverb

For a bad night, a mattress of wine. – Spanish Proverb

For a chaste woman God is enough. – Spanish Proverb

For a good companion good company. – Spanish Proverb

For all one’s early rising, it dawns none the sooner. – Spanish Proverb

For better for worse they have married me. – Spanish Proverb

For evil tongues, scissors. – Spanish Proverb

For the want of worthy men they made my father alcade. – Spanish Proverb

For want of a nail the shoe is lost. – Spanish Proverb

For whom does the blind man’s wife adorn herself? – Spanish Proverb

For whom sword and courage are not enough, corslet and lance will not be enough. – Spanish Proverb

Forewarned is forearmed. – Spanish Proverb

Fortune aids the bold. – Spanish Proverb

Foster a raven and it will peck out your eyes. – Spanish Proverb

Four eyes see more than two. – Spanish Proverb

Four things put a man beside himself–women, tobacco, cards, and wine. – Spanish Proverb

Fox’s broth, cold and scalding. – Spanish Proverb

Fresh port and new wine, send a Christian to the churchyard. – Spanish Proverb

Friday pretexts for not fasting. – Spanish Proverb

Friendless in life, friendless in death. – Spanish Proverb

Friendly words gain much and cost nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Friends and wine should be old. – Spanish Proverb

Friendship broken may be soldered, but never made whole. – Spanish Proverb

Frivolous talk is like shooting without aiming. – Spanish Proverb

From a fallen tree, all make kindling. – Spanish Proverb

From a praying young man, and a fasting old man, God preserve my cloak. – Spanish Proverb

From a silent man, and a dog that does not bark, deliver us. – Spanish Proverb

From a silent person remove your dwelling. – Spanish Proverb

From long journeys long lies. – Spanish Proverb

From my gossip’s bread a large piece for my godson. – Spanish Proverb

From smooth water God preserve me, from rough I will preserve myself. – Spanish Proverb

From snow, whether baked or boiled, you will get nothing but water. – Spanish Proverb

From that dust comes this mud. – Spanish Proverb

From the leather of others you can cut long strips. – Spanish Proverb

Get a good name and go to sleep. – Spanish Proverb

Get a name to rise early, and you may lie all day. – Spanish Proverb

Gifts break rocks. – Spanish Proverb

Give a clown your foot, and he’ll take your hand. – Spanish Proverb

Give a dog a bad name and hang him. – Spanish Proverb

Give a dog a bad name and hang it. – Spanish Proverb

Give a thing and take a thing, to wear the devil’s gold ring. – Spanish Proverb

Give a traitor good words and you make him loyal. – Spanish Proverb

Give me a seat, and I will make myself room to lie down. – Spanish Proverb

Give me the ass that carries me in preference to the horse that throws me. – Spanish Proverb

Give orders and do no more, and nothing will come of it. – Spanish Proverb

Give the grateful man more than he asks for. – Spanish Proverb

Giving alms never lessens the purse. – Spanish Proverb

Go in God’s name, for he takes a loaf of mine. – Spanish Proverb

Go not every evening to your brother’s house. – Spanish Proverb

Go not with every ailment to the doctor, with every plea to the lawyer, or with every thirst to the can. – Spanish Proverb

Go to bed supperless and you will wake without debt. – Spanish Proverb

Go to bed with the lamb, and rise with the lark. – Spanish Proverb

Go to friends for advice, woman for love, strangers for charity and relatives for nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Go to friends for advice; to women for pity; to strangers for charity; to relatives for nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Go to your aunt’s house, but not every day. – Spanish Proverb

God comes to see without ringing the bell. – Spanish Proverb

God cures, and the doctor takes the fee. – Spanish Proverb

God defend you from the devil, the eye of a harlot, and the turn of a die. – Spanish Proverb

God delays but doesn’t forget. – Spanish Proverb

God deliver me from a man of one book. – Spanish Proverb

God deliver us from a gentleman by day and a friar by night. – Spanish Proverb

God does not smite with both hands. – Spanish Proverb

God give you luck, my son, for little wit must serve your turn. – Spanish Proverb

God gives almonds to one who has no teeth. – Spanish Proverb

God gives wings to the ant that she may perish the sooner. – Spanish Proverb

God grant me to argue with those who understand me. – Spanish Proverb

God grant me to contend with those that understand me. – Spanish Proverb

God grant you good fortune, my son, for knowledge avails you little. – Spanish Proverb

God grant, dear wife, that this son be ours. – Spanish Proverb

God helps him who helps himself. – Spanish Proverb

God helps the early riser. – Spanish Proverb

God is a good worker but He loves to be helped. – Spanish Proverb

God keep you from “It is too late.” – Spanish Proverb

God made us, and we admire ourselves. – Spanish Proverb

God makes the back to the burden. – Spanish Proverb

God sends cold after clothes. – Spanish Proverb

God take you, pound, drunk out and not yet spun. – Spanish Proverb

God will listen to you whatever cloak you wear. – Spanish Proverb

God will provide, but a good bundle of straw will not be amiss. – Spanish Proverb

God writes straight with crooked lines. – Spanish Proverb

God, healeth, and the physician hath the thanks. – Spanish Proverb

Good is the fowl which another rears. – Spanish Proverb

Good luck makes its way in by elbowing. – Spanish Proverb

Good men must die, but death cannot kill their names. – Spanish Proverb

Good news is rumoured and bad news flies. – Spanish Proverb

Good wine needs no crier. – Spanish Proverb

Good wine sells itself. – Spanish Proverb

Good wines needs no bush. – Spanish Proverb

Good words and bad deeds deceive both wise and simple. – Spanish Proverb

Good words and no deeds are rushes and reeds. – Spanish Proverb

Good words fill not a sack. – Spanish Proverb

Good, good, good, but God keep my ass out of his rye. – Spanish Proverb

Good, that comes too late, is good as nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Grain by grain the hen fills her crop. – Spanish Proverb

Grasp all, lose all. – Spanish Proverb

Grasp no more than thy hand will hold. – Spanish Proverb

Grass doesn’t grow on a busy street. – Spanish Proverb

Great minds think alike. – Spanish Proverb

Growing old is no more than another bad habit. – Spanish Proverb

Guests always have nice backs. – Spanish Proverb

Habits are first cobwebs, then cables. – Spanish Proverb

Habits are first gossamer then cables. – Spanish Proverb

Half a loaf is better than no bread. – Spanish Proverb

Half the truth is often a whole lie. – Spanish Proverb

Halfway is twelve miles when you have fourteen miles to go. – Spanish Proverb

Happiness itself does not stay — only moments of happiness do. – Spanish Proverb

Happy the house in which there is no shaven crown. – Spanish Proverb

Harm watch, harm catch. – Spanish Proverb

Have a bill to pay at Easter, and your Lent will be short. – Spanish Proverb

Have patience and the mulberry leaf will become satin. – Spanish Proverb

He buys well who is not called a donkey. – Spanish Proverb

He can do but little who cannot threaten another. – Spanish Proverb

He cannot find water in the sea. – Spanish Proverb

He did not invent gunpowder. – Spanish Proverb

He does not a little who burns his house: he frightens the rats, and warms himself. – Spanish Proverb

He expects to find water at the first stroke of the spade. – Spanish Proverb

He falls into the pit who leads another into it. – Spanish Proverb

He gathers up ashes and scatters flour. – Spanish Proverb

He gives twice who gives in a trice. – Spanish Proverb

He goes safely to trial whose father is a judge. – Spanish Proverb

He has much to do who would please everybody. – Spanish Proverb

He is a fool who thinks that another does not think. – Spanish Proverb

He is a good dog who goes to church. – Spanish Proverb

He is a great simpleton who starves himself to feed another. – Spanish Proverb

He is always right who suspects that he is always wrong. – Spanish Proverb

He is blind enough who cannot see through a sieve. – Spanish Proverb

He is in safety who rings the tocsin. – Spanish Proverb

He is my friend who grinds at my mill. – Spanish Proverb

He is out of danger who rings the alarm-bell. – Spanish Proverb

He is your friend who gets you out of a fray. – Spanish Proverb

He knows it as well as his Lord’s Prayer. – Spanish Proverb

He loses his market who has nothing to sell. – Spanish Proverb

He loves well who never forgets. – Spanish Proverb

He made a pit and digged it, and has fallen into the ditch which he made. – Spanish Proverb

He made me mad To see him shine so brisk and smell so sweet. – Spanish Proverb

He preaches well who lives well. – Spanish Proverb

He that blames would buy. – Spanish Proverb

He that chastens one chastens twenty. – Spanish Proverb

He that does not lie, does not come of good blood. – Spanish Proverb

He that does not show himself is overlooked. – Spanish Proverb

He that eats his fowl alone may saddle his horse alone. – Spanish Proverb

He that eats the king’s geese shall be choked with the feathers. – Spanish Proverb

He that eats till he is sick must fast till he is well. – Spanish Proverb

He that fights and runs away, lives to fight another day. – Spanish Proverb

He that has a good harvest must be able to endure a few thistles. – Spanish Proverb

He that has an hour’s start will not be hanged. – Spanish Proverb

He that has an ill name is half hanged. – Spanish Proverb

He that has no ill luck grows weary of good luck. – Spanish Proverb

He that is born to be hanged shall never be drowned. You can’t escape your destiny. – Spanish Proverb

He that is more civil than usual, either wants to cozen you or has need of you. – Spanish Proverb

He that is not gallant at twenty, strong at thirty, rich at forty, or experienced at fifty, will never be gallant, strong, rich, or prudent. – Spanish Proverb

He that is not sensible of his loss has lost nothing. – Spanish Proverb

He that is rich will not be called a fool. – Spanish Proverb

He that makes one basket can make a hundred. – Spanish Proverb

He that marries a widow will often have a dead man’s head thrown into the dish. – Spanish Proverb

He that minds his business at home, will not be accused of taking part in the fray. – Spanish Proverb

He that neglects time, time will neglect. – Spanish Proverb

He that stirs honey will have some of it stick to him. – Spanish Proverb

He that ties well, unties well. – Spanish Proverb

He that trusts a faithless friend, has a good witness against him. – Spanish Proverb

He that will not when he can, cannot when he will. – Spanish Proverb

He that will not when he may, when he will he shall have nay. – Spanish Proverb

He that would be healthy must wear his winter clothes in summer. – Spanish Proverb

He that would have a beautiful wife should choose her on a Saturday. – Spanish Proverb

He that would have the fruit must climb the tree. – Spanish Proverb

He to whom God gives no sons, the devil gives nephews. – Spanish Proverb

He who always tells me a lie never cheats me. – Spanish Proverb

He who asks the fewest favors is the best received. – Spanish Proverb

He who asks the fewest favours is the best received. – Spanish Proverb

He who at thirty has no brains, will never purchase an estate. – Spanish Proverb

Spanish Proverbs

He who at twenty understands nothing, at thirty knows nothing, and at forty has nothing, will lead a wretched old age. – Spanish Proverb

He who avoids the temptation avoids the sin. – Spanish Proverb

He who begins badly, ends badly. – Spanish Proverb

He who builds a house, or marries, is left with a lank purse. – Spanish Proverb

He who buts a horse buys care. – Spanish Proverb

He who buys and sells does not feel what he spends. – Spanish Proverb

He who catches one fish is a fisherman. – Spanish Proverb

He who comes first grinds first. – Spanish Proverb

He who dances well goes from wedding to wedding. – Spanish Proverb

He who deals with a blockhead will need a lot of brains. – Spanish Proverb

He who delays, gathers. – Spanish Proverb

He who denies all confesses all. – Spanish Proverb

He who denies everything confesses everything. – Spanish Proverb

He who divides gets the worst share. – Spanish Proverb

He who does good to you either dies or goes away. – Spanish Proverb

He who does no more than another is no better than another. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not honour his wife, dishonours himself. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not look before lags behind. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not mix with the crowd knows nothing. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not pick up a pin cares nothing for his wife. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not repair his gutter has a whole house to repair. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not show himself, is overlooked. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not speak, God does not hear. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not tire, achieves. – Spanish Proverb

He who does not whip the child does not mend the youth. – Spanish Proverb

He who does what he likes, does not what he ought. – Spanish Proverb

He who doubts nothing knows nothing. – Spanish Proverb

He who dresses ion others’ clothes will be undressed on the highway. – Spanish Proverb

He who eats a partridge in his youth will only be left with feathers in his old age. – Spanish Proverb

He who eats alone chokes alone. – Spanish Proverb

He who eats and puts by, has sufficient for two meals. – Spanish Proverb

He who eats the king’s cow lean, pays for it fat. – Spanish Proverb

He who eats the meat let him pick the bone. – Spanish Proverb

He who excuses himself accuses himself. – Spanish Proverb

He who fears death cannot enjoy life. – Spanish Proverb

He who finds fault wants to buy. – Spanish Proverb

He who follows his own advice must take the consequences. – Spanish Proverb

He who forgives a thief is a thief himself. – Spanish Proverb

He who gives to the public, gives to no one. – Spanish Proverb

He who gives when he is asked has waited too long. – Spanish Proverb

He who goes far from home to marry, goes either to deceive or be deceived. – Spanish Proverb

He who goes to law for a sheep loses his cow. – Spanish Proverb

He who goes with wolves learns to howl. – Spanish Proverb

He who grasps all loses all. – Spanish Proverb

He who grasps at much holds fast little. – Spanish Proverb

He who greases his cart-wheels helps his oxen. – Spanish Proverb

He who greases his wheels, helps his oxen. – Spanish Proverb

He who hangs out a branch wants to sell his wine. – Spanish Proverb

He who has a bad wife can expect no happiness that can be so called. – Spanish Proverb

He who has a glass roof should not throw stones at his neighbour’s. – Spanish Proverb

He who has a good looking wife, a castle on the river, or a vineyard on the roadside is never without war. – Spanish Proverb

He who has a good wife can bear any evil. – Spanish Proverb

He who has a handsome wife, a castle on the frontier, or a vineyard on the roadside, is never without war. – Spanish Proverb

He who has a son grown up should not call another a thief. – Spanish Proverb

He who has a tongue goes to Rome. – Spanish Proverb

He who has a trade may travel through the world. – Spanish Proverb

He who has been first a novice and then an abbot, knows what the boys do behind the altar. – Spanish Proverb

He who has been stung by the scorpion is frightened at its shadow. – Spanish Proverb

He who has both money and bread, may choose with whom his daughter to wed. – Spanish Proverb

He who has but one coat cannot lend it. – Spanish Proverb

He who has daughters to marry, let him give them silk to spin. – Spanish Proverb

He who has enemies, let him not sleep. – Spanish Proverb

He who has got four and spends five, has no occasion for a purse. – Spanish Proverb

He who has lost his oxen is always hearing bells. – Spanish Proverb

He who has lost his reputation is a dead man among the living. – Spanish Proverb

He who has no head wants no hat. – Spanish Proverb

He who has no house of his own is everywhere at home. – Spanish Proverb

He who has no shame has no conscience. – Spanish Proverb

He who has no voice in the valley, will have none in the council. – Spanish Proverb

He who has no wife, is for thrashing her daily; but he that has one, takes care of her. – Spanish Proverb

He who has servants has unavoidable enemies. – Spanish Proverb

He who has sheep has fleeces. – Spanish Proverb

He who has shipped the devil, must carry him over the sound. – Spanish Proverb

He who has to deal with a blockhead has need of much brains. – Spanish Proverb

He who has two masters to serve must lie to one of them. – Spanish Proverb

He who helps everybody, helps nobody. – Spanish Proverb

He who inherits a hill must climb it. – Spanish Proverb

He who is a Basque, a good Christian and has two mules, needs nothing more. – Spanish Proverb

He who is afraid of a thing gives it power over him. – Spanish Proverb

He who is caught in a lie is not believed when he tells the truth. – Spanish Proverb

He who is contented is not always rich. – Spanish Proverb

He who is everybody’s friend is either very poor or very rich. – Spanish Proverb

He who is feared gets more than his own. – Spanish Proverb

He who is in the mud likes to get another into it. – Spanish Proverb

He who is proud of his sins, sins twice as much. – Spanish Proverb

He who is silent gains store. – Spanish Proverb

He who keeps his own secret avoids much mischief. – Spanish Proverb

He who knows how to live, knows enough. – Spanish Proverb

He who knows little soon tells it. – Spanish Proverb

He who knows nothing is as blind as him who cannot see. – Spanish Proverb

He who knows nothing, doubts nothing. – Spanish Proverb

He who laid a snare for me has fallen into it. – Spanish Proverb

He who leaves his people will be left by God. – Spanish Proverb

He who lies down with dogs gets up with fleas. – Spanish Proverb

He who lives a long life must pass through much evil. – Spanish Proverb

He who lives in hopes, breakfasts ill and sups worse. – Spanish Proverb

He who looks demurely trust not with your money. – Spanish Proverb

He who lost his faith, has nothing more to lose. – Spanish Proverb

He who loves Bertrand loves his dog. – Spanish Proverb

He who loves me loves my dog too. – Spanish Proverb

He who loves Peter won’t harm his dog. – Spanish Proverb

He who loves well is slow to forget. – Spanish Proverb

He who loves well, obeys well. – Spanish Proverb

He who made fun of the old man, laughed at first and cried afterwards. – Spanish Proverb

He who makes a law should keep it. – Spanish Proverb

He who makes light of his enemy dies by his hand. – Spanish Proverb

He who marries a widow will often have a dead man’s head thrown in his dish. – Spanish Proverb

He who marries ill, is long in becoming widowed. – Spanish Proverb

He who marrieth does well, but he who marrieth not, better. – Spanish Proverb

He who measures oil greases his hands. – Spanish Proverb

He who never has enough, never has anything. – Spanish Proverb

He who pays the piper calls the tune. – Spanish Proverb

He who peeps through a hole may see what will vex him. – Spanish Proverb

He who plants the lettuce doesn’t always eat the salad. – Spanish Proverb

He who pledges or promises runs in debt. – Spanish Proverb

He who pours water hastily into a bottle spills more than goes in. – Spanish Proverb

He who promises incurs a debt. – Spanish Proverb

He who receives the offerings let him ring the bells. – Spanish Proverb

He who reforms, God assists. – Spanish Proverb

He who remains in the mill grinds, not he who goes to and fro. – Spanish Proverb

He who rides behind another does not saddle when he will. – Spanish Proverb

He who runs in his youth, trots in his old age. – Spanish Proverb

He who saves, finds. – Spanish Proverb

He who says what he likes, hears what he does not like. – Spanish Proverb

He who seeks, finds. – Spanish Proverb

He who serves is not free. – Spanish Proverb

He who serves many masters must neglect some of them. – Spanish Proverb

He who shelters under a tree gets twice as wet. – Spanish Proverb

He who sleeps much, learns little. – Spanish Proverb

He who sows brambles must not go barefoot. – Spanish Proverb

He who sows brambles reaps thorns. – Spanish Proverb

He who sows courtesy reaps friendship, and he who plants kindness gathers love. – Spanish Proverb

He who sows well, reaps well. – Spanish Proverb

He who spits above himself will have it fall on his face. – Spanish Proverb

He who steals once is always a thief. – Spanish Proverb

He who steals once is never trusty. – Spanish Proverb

He who strives to do, does more than he who has the power. – Spanish Proverb

He who stumbles and does not fall mends his pace. – Spanish Proverb

He who stumbles twice over one stone deserves to break his shins. – Spanish Proverb

He who takes the wrong road must make his journey twice over. – Spanish Proverb

He who talks a lot is bound to be right sometimes. – Spanish Proverb

He who talks much is sometimes right. – Spanish Proverb

He who talks to a mule is one himself. – Spanish Proverb

He who tells his own secret will hardly keep another’s. – Spanish Proverb

He who threatens to strike, and does not, is afraid. – Spanish Proverb

He who trifles with his enemy dies by his hand. – Spanish Proverb

He who wants a mule without fault must walk on foot. – Spanish Proverb

He who wants to be rich in a year comes to the gallows in half a year. – Spanish Proverb

He who wants to bring home the riches of India, he must have them within himself. – Spanish Proverb

He who wants to catch fish must not mind a wetting. – Spanish Proverb

He who wants to kill his dog only has to say he is mad. – Spanish Proverb

He who was first an acolyte, and afterwards an abbot or curate, knows what the boys do behind the altar. – Spanish Proverb

He who works on the highway will have many advisers. – Spanish Proverb

He who would be rich should not collect money, but reduce his needs. – Spanish Proverb

He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies must carry the wealth of the Indies with him. – Spanish Proverb

He who would cheat the fox must rise early. – Spanish Proverb

He who would take must give. – Spanish Proverb

He who would thrive must follow the church, the sea, or the king’s service. – Spanish Proverb

He whose house is tiled with glass should not throw stones at his neighbour’s. – Spanish Proverb

He will never worship well the image on the altar who knew it when it was a trunk of wood in the garden. – Spanish Proverb

Health and cheerfulness make beauty; finery and cosmetics cost money and lie. – Spanish Proverb

Health is better than wealth. – Spanish Proverb

Hear first, and speak afterwards. – Spanish Proverb

Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil. – Spanish Proverb

Hell has no fury like a woman scorned. – Spanish Proverb

Hell is full of the ungrateful. – Spanish Proverb

Her father’s fortune will make the ugliest girl attractive. – Spanish Proverb

Her left hand doesn’t know what her right hand is doing. – Spanish Proverb

Hidden joy is an extinguished candle. – Spanish Proverb

Him who errs, forgive once, but never twice. – Spanish Proverb

His bread fell into the honey. – Spanish Proverb

His courage oozed out at his fingers’ ends. – Spanish Proverb

Home is where he hangs his hat. – Spanish Proverb

Home is where the heart is. – Spanish Proverb

Honesty is the best policy. – Spanish Proverb

Honey was not made for the mouth of the ass. – Spanish Proverb

Honor and money cannot go in the same sack. – Spanish Proverb

Honor buys no meat in the market. Hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper. – Spanish Proverb

Hope deferred makes the heart sick. – Spanish Proverb

Hope for the best and prepare for the worst. – Spanish Proverb

How beautiful it is to do nothing, and then rest afterward. – Spanish Proverb

How nice it is to see the rain without getting wet. – Spanish Proverb

How shall the enemy of the bride speak well of the wedding? – Spanish Proverb

However bright the sun may shine, leave not your cloak at home. – Spanish Proverb

However early you get up you cannot hasten the dawn. – Spanish Proverb

However foul it be, never say, Of this water I will not drink. – Spanish Proverb

Hunger and cold give a man up to his enemy. – Spanish Proverb

Hunger drives the wolf out of the woods. – Spanish Proverb

Hunger is good kitchen. – Spanish Proverb

Hunger is the best sauce. – Spanish Proverb

Hunger never saw bad bread. – Spanish Proverb

Husband, don’t see;
Wife, be blind. – Spanish Proverb

Husband, you are a cuckold;
Wife, who told you so? – Spanish Proverb

Hush, brideswoman, I knew all that before. – Spanish Proverb

I a lazy lout, you a lazy lout, marry me, Antonia. – Spanish Proverb

I am like you and you like me. the devil united us. – Spanish Proverb

I am neither at the ford nor the bridge. – Spanish Proverb

I broke my leg, perhaps for my good. – Spanish Proverb

I cried when I was born and as each day passes I know why. – Spanish Proverb

I dance to the tune that is played. – Spanish Proverb

I do not tell thee what thou art, thou wilt tell it thyself. – Spanish Proverb

I don’t care what people say as long as I get what want. – Spanish Proverb

I don’t count them to you, wife, but a hog makes twelve puddings. – Spanish Proverb

I don’t want it, I don’t want it, but put it into my hood. – Spanish Proverb

I don’t want the cheese; I just want out of the trap. – Spanish Proverb

I have a good jacket in France. – Spanish Proverb

I know they are all honest men, but my cloak is nowhere to be found. – Spanish Proverb

I know well what I say when I ask for bread. – Spanish Proverb

I know what I know, but will say nothing about it. – Spanish Proverb

I left what I knew for what I heard praised, and repented. – Spanish Proverb

I like not fair terms and a villain’s mind. – Spanish Proverb

I mistress and you miss, who is to sweep the house? – Spanish Proverb

I neither give nor take, like a Jew on the Sabbath. – Spanish Proverb

I never was satisfied with “I will, I will.” One “take this” is better than two “I will give you.” – Spanish Proverb

I perfectly feel even at my fingers end. – Spanish Proverb

I say it to you, daughter; hear it, daughter-in-law. – Spanish Proverb

I stubborn and you stubborn, who is to carry the load? – Spanish Proverb

I thought I had made the sign of the cross — and I hurt my eye. – Spanish Proverb

I thought I had no husband, and I eat up the stew. – Spanish Proverb

I thought to cross myself, and I put out my eye. – Spanish Proverb

I wept when I was born and every day explains why. – Spanish Proverb

I would rather have a donkey that can carry me than a horse that throws me. – Spanish Proverb

Idiots can sometimes give good advice. – Spanish Proverb

If a job is worth doing, it’s worth doing well. – Spanish Proverb

If a person is away, his right is away. – Spanish Proverb

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Never say die. – Spanish Proverb

If folly were a pain, there would be groaning in every house. – Spanish Proverb

If fools went not to market, bad wares would not be sold. – Spanish Proverb

If I am a fool, put your finger in my mouth. – Spanish Proverb

If I die, I forgive you. If I live we shall see. – Spanish Proverb

If I die, I forgive you; if I recover, we shall see. – Spanish Proverb

If it is good then the deed is more important than the intention; if it’s bad then the intention is worse than the deed. – Spanish Proverb

If love be timid it is not true. – Spanish Proverb

If lying were a capital crime, the hangman would work overtime. – Spanish Proverb

If one, two, three say you are an ass, put on a tail. – Spanish Proverb

If only I were a bird! Ah, but eating caterpillars? – Spanish Proverb

If people lead, the leaders will follow. – Spanish Proverb

If someone cannot even keep his own secrets, don’t count on him to keep someone else’s. – Spanish Proverb

If the child cries let the mother hush it, and if it will not be hushed let it cry. – Spanish Proverb

If the devil is going to disguise himself, it will be as a monk or a lawyer. – Spanish Proverb

If the doctor is fasting it is bad for the priest. – Spanish Proverb

If the eyes don’t see, the heart won’t break. – Spanish Proverb

If the mountain will not go to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain. – Spanish Proverb

If the peacock were to look at its feet, it would stop him strutting. – Spanish Proverb

If the pitcher knocks against a stone, woe to the pitcher; and if the stone knocks against the pitcher, woe to the pitcher. – Spanish Proverb

If the rings are lost, here are the fingers still. – Spanish Proverb

If the sky falls there will be pots broken. – Spanish Proverb

If the sky falls we shall catch larks. – Spanish Proverb

If the sky falls, hold up your hands. – Spanish Proverb

If there be no remedy, why worry? – Spanish Proverb

If there is still doubt do not accuse. – Spanish Proverb

If there were no receivers, there would be no thieves. – Spanish Proverb

If there’s no bread, cakes are very good. – Spanish Proverb

If they say you are good, ask you self if it be true. – Spanish Proverb

If this ball does not stick to the wall it will at least leave a mark. – Spanish Proverb

If three people say you are an ass, put on a bridle. – Spanish Proverb

If thy heart fail thee, why then climb at all? – Spanish Proverb

If two doctors visit a sick man, the sexton rings the bells. – Spanish Proverb

If wishes were horses, then beggars would ride. – Spanish Proverb

If you are choosing between bad company and loneliness, choose the second option. – Spanish Proverb

If you are not good for yourself, how can you be good for others? – Spanish Proverb

If you cannot be chaste, be cautious. – Spanish Proverb

If you can’t bite, don’t show your teeth. – Spanish Proverb

If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. – Spanish Proverb

If you don’t pay a servant his wages, then he will pay himself. – Spanish Proverb

If you don’t have what it takes you won’t get on in the world. – Spanish Proverb

If you eat it up at supper, you cannot have it for breakfast. – Spanish Proverb

If you go away, you can’t expect people to keep your place for you. – Spanish Proverb

If you have a friend who is a doctor, make your bow and send him to the house of your enemy. – Spanish Proverb

If you have a loitering servant, set his dinner before him and send him on an errand. – Spanish Proverb

If you have nothing better to do, go to bed with your own wife. – Spanish Proverb

If you leave your place, you lose it. – Spanish Proverb

If you lie down with dogs, you’ll get up with fleas. – Spanish Proverb

If you listen at a hole, you will hear ill of yourself as well as others. – Spanish Proverb

If you live like that, you’re bound to come to a bad end. – Spanish Proverb

If you live with wolves learn to howl. – Spanish Proverb

If you love me, John, your acts will tell me so. – Spanish Proverb

If you must battle your enemy, hit him where it hurts him most. – Spanish Proverb

If you pay not a servant his wages then he will pay himself. – Spanish Proverb

If you pay what you owe, what you’re worth you’ll know. – Spanish Proverb

If you play with fire you get burnt. – Spanish Proverb

If you talk too much you’re likely to give yourself away. – Spanish Proverb

If you tell your secret to your friend, you will make him your master. – Spanish Proverb

If you think the worst, you won’t be far wrong. – Spanish Proverb

If you want a fine wife, don’t pick her on a Sunday. – Spanish Proverb

If you want good service, serve yourself. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to be dead, wash your head and go to bed. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to be respected, you must respect yourself. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to be revenged, hold your tongue. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to beat a dog, say he eat your iron. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to know secrets, seek for them in trouble or in pleasure. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to know the value of money, go and borrow some. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to know what a ducat is worth, try to borrow one. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to know what a man is really like, notice how he acts when he loses money. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to live and thrive, let the spider run alive. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to marry wisely, marry your equal. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to sleep well, buy the bed of a bankrupt. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to thrash your wife, ask her for a drink of water in the sun. – Spanish Proverb

If you want to watch, you’d better keep quiet. – Spanish Proverb

If you wish good advice, consult an old man. – Spanish Proverb

If you wish to be well served, serve yourself. – Spanish Proverb

If you would acquire fame, let not the sun shine on you in bed. – Spanish Proverb

If you would be pope, you must think of nothing else. – Spanish Proverb

If you would be well served, serve yourself. – Spanish Proverb

If you would have the dog follow you, give him bread. – Spanish Proverb

If you would live healthy, be old early. – Spanish Proverb

If you would live in health, grow old early. – Spanish Proverb

If you would make a thief honest, trust him. – Spanish Proverb

If youhave the moon, ignore the stars. – Spanish Proverb

If your enemy is up to his waist in water, give him your hand; if the water reaches his shoulders, stand on his head. – Spanish Proverb

If your roof is made of glass, don’t throw stones at your neighbor’s house. – Spanish Proverb

If your wife tells you to throw yourself off a cliff, pray to God that it is a low one. – Spanish Proverb

Ill luck enters by fathoms and departs by inches. – Spanish Proverb

I’ll marry, and eat the prime of the pot, and sit down first. – Spanish Proverb

Ill weeds are not hurt by frost. – Spanish Proverb

Ill-luck upon ill-luck, and a stone for a pillow. – Spanish Proverb

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. – Spanish Proverb

In a calm sea every man is a pilot. – Spanish Proverb

In a choice between bad company and loneliness — the second is preferable. – Spanish Proverb

In a smith’s house the knife is wooden. – Spanish Proverb

In a soap maker’s house, a person who doesn’t fall, slips. – Spanish Proverb

In a wood don’t walk behind another. – Spanish Proverb

In for a penny, in for a pound. – Spanish Proverb

In frosty weather a nail is worth a horse. – Spanish Proverb

In hunting and in love you begin when you like and leave off when you can. – Spanish Proverb

In large rivers one finds big fish but one may also be drowned. – Spanish Proverb

In less than a thousand years we shall all be bald. – Spanish Proverb

In my own house I am a king. – Spanish Proverb

In the absence of honest men, they made my father mayor. – Spanish Proverb

In the bagpiper’s house they are all dancers. – Spanish Proverb

In the face of love and death, courage is useless. – Spanish Proverb

In the garden more grows, than the gardener sows. – Spanish Proverb

In the long run, the greyhound kills the hare. – Spanish Proverb

In the presence of your neighbor don’t praise your wife or his. – Spanish Proverb

In the report, of riches and goodness always bate one half. – Spanish Proverb

In the rich woman’s house she always commands; he never. – Spanish Proverb

In trouble to be troubled is to have your trouble doubled. – Spanish Proverb

In wartime no sweets are given out. – Spanish Proverb

Indiscreet questions must be answered with a lie. – Spanish Proverb

Ingratitude is the daughter of pride. – Spanish Proverb

Insults should be well avenged or well endured. – Spanish Proverb

Invite your son-in-law to a fowl, and he will take away the lemon. – Spanish Proverb

It fares ill with the house where the spinning-wheel commands the sword. – Spanish Proverb

It goes ill in the house where the hen sings and the cock is silent. – Spanish Proverb

It is a bad hen that eats at your house and lays at another’s. – Spanish Proverb

It is a loss of soap to wash the ass’s head. – Spanish Proverb

It is a wise son that knows his own father. – Spanish Proverb

It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest. – Spanish Proverb

It is approved alchemy to have an income and spend nothing. – Spanish Proverb

It is beautiful to do nothing and then rest afterwards. – Spanish Proverb

It is better if they say “He ran away here” than “He died here.” – Spanish Proverb

It is better to be a mouse in a cat’s mouth than a man in a lawyer’s hands.

It is better to be born a beggar than a fool. – Spanish Proverb

It is better to conceal one’s knowledge than to reveal one’s ignorance. – Spanish Proverb

It is better to have bread left over than to run short of wine. – Spanish Proverb

It is better to leap over the ditch than trust to the pleadings of good men. – Spanish Proverb

It is better to lose than lose more. – Spanish Proverb

It is better to skip one meal than to consult a hundred doctors. – Spanish Proverb

It is better to strive with a stubborn ass than to carry the wood on one’s back. – Spanish Proverb

It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive. – Spanish Proverb

It is better to weep with wise men than to laugh with fools. – Spanish Proverb

It is courage that vanquishes in war, and not good weapons. – Spanish Proverb

It is fair and just to cheat the cheater. – Spanish Proverb

It is good fishing in troubled waters. – Spanish Proverb

It is good to have friends, even in hell. – Spanish Proverb

It is in putting it into the oven that the loaf is made crooked. – Spanish Proverb

It is in vain to cast nets in a river where there are no fish. – Spanish Proverb

It is no fun to guard a house with two doors. – Spanish Proverb

It is not in the pilot’s power to prevent the wind from blowing. – Spanish Proverb

It is not necessary to fall into a well to know its depth. – Spanish Proverb

It is not the fine, but the coarse and ill-spun that breaks. – Spanish Proverb

It is not the hook or the rod, but the bait that lures. – Spanish Proverb

It is not the load but the overload that kills. – Spanish Proverb

It is not the same thing to talk of bulls as to be in the bullring. – Spanish Proverb

It is nothing, they are only thrashing my husband. – Spanish Proverb

It is the bait that lures, not the fisherman or the rod. – Spanish Proverb

It is the truth that irritates a person. – Spanish Proverb

It is very savoury to eat scot free. – Spanish Proverb

It just makes things worse. – Spanish Proverb

It little avails the unfortunate to be brave. – Spanish Proverb

It makes no difference. It’s as broad as it is long. – Spanish Proverb

It never rains, but it pours. – Spanish Proverb

It rains sorrow on him who is already wet. – Spanish Proverb

It takes taste to account for taste. – Spanish Proverb

It takes two to quarrel, but only one to end it. – Spanish Proverb

It will all come out in the soap-suds. – Spanish Proverb

Italians talk to women, Frenchmen to the learned, and the Spaniard talks to God. – Spanish Proverb

It’s a Small world. – Spanish Proverb

It’s better to arrive on time than to be invited. – Spanish Proverb

It’s better to be on your own than with people you don’t like. – Spanish Proverb

It’s dogged as does it. – Spanish Proverb

It’s enough to make a parson swear, or a Quaker kick his mother. – Spanish Proverb

It’s just a question of putting two and two together. – Spanish Proverb

It’s like talking to a brick wall. – Spanish Proverb

It’s like water off a duck’s back. – Spanish Proverb

It’s more blessed to give than to receive. – Spanish Proverb

It’s no crime to steal from a thief. – Spanish Proverb

It’s not the end of the world. Worse things happened at sea. – Spanish Proverb

It’s not the same to talk of bulls as to be in the bullring. – Spanish Proverb

It’s not worth crying over spilt milk. – Spanish Proverb

It’s the grinding of his teeth that awakes the blacksmith’s dog, not the noise of the hammer. – Spanish Proverb

I’ve fried my sausage in better pans than these. – Spanish Proverb

Jest so that it may not turn to earnest. – Spanish Proverb

Jesting costs money. – Spanish Proverb

Justice, but not in my own house. – Spanish Proverb

Keeping a woman to her word is like trying to hold an eel by its tail. – Spanish Proverb

Kill and thou wilt be killed, and he will be killed who kills thee. – Spanish Proverb

Know, cabbages, that there is spinach in the stew. – Spanish Proverb

Large thongs of another man’s leather. – Spanish Proverb

Late children are early orphans. – Spanish Proverb

Laughter is the best medicine. – Spanish Proverb

Laws go the way kings direct. – Spanish Proverb

Laws, like the spider’s web, catch the fly and let the hawk go free. – Spanish Proverb

Laws, like the spider’s webs, catch the flies and let the hawk go free. – Spanish Proverb

Learn from your tears and you will win laughing. – Spanish Proverb

Learning is better than house and land. – Spanish Proverb

Least said, soonest mended. – Spanish Proverb

Leave the jest at its best. – Spanish Proverb

Let bygones be bygones. – Spanish Proverb

Let every man mind his own business. – Spanish Proverb

Let every sheep hang by it own foot. – Spanish Proverb

Let every tub stand on its own bottom. – Spanish Proverb

Let fools and wind pass. – Spanish Proverb

Let him not complain of being cheated who buys cloth by the pattern. – Spanish Proverb

Let him play the instrument who knows how. – Spanish Proverb

Let him that has a mouth not say to another, Blow. – Spanish Proverb

Let him who does not know you buy you. – Spanish Proverb

Let it be a husband, though it be but a log. – Spanish Proverb

Let me go warm, and folks may laugh. – Spanish Proverb

Let no one say, “Of this water I will not drink.” – Spanish Proverb

Let no one take a pawn that eats. – Spanish Proverb

Let no shovel-beaked bird ever enter your yard. – Spanish Proverb

Let not the tongue utter what the head must pay for. – Spanish Proverb

Let sleeping dogs lie. – Spanish Proverb

Let the dog bark so he don’t bite me. – Spanish Proverb

Let the dogs bark; it’s a sign that we are galloping ahead. – Spanish Proverb

Let the guts be full, for it is they that carry the legs. – Spanish Proverb

Let the miracle be wrought, though it be by the devil. – Spanish Proverb

Let the salad-maker be a spendthrift for oil, a miser for vinegar, a statesman for salt, and a madman for tossing. – Spanish Proverb

Let the sun shine on me, for I care not for the moon. – Spanish Proverb

Let them be birds. – Spanish Proverb

Let them talk of men, and beg of me. – Spanish Proverb

Let them whip me in the market-place, provided it be not known at home. – Spanish Proverb

Let there be food in the pigeon-house, and the pigeons will come to it. – Spanish Proverb

Let there be no lack of food in the pigeon-house, and the pigeons will come to it. – Spanish Proverb

Let there be writing before you pay, and receipt before you write. – Spanish Proverb

Let those pater nosters be for your own soul. – Spanish Proverb

Let what is lost go for God’s sake. – Spanish Proverb

Let your heart guide your head in evil matters. – Spanish Proverb

Let’s get things clear. – Spanish Proverb

Liberty has no price. – Spanish Proverb

Life is a gift for which we pay dearly. – Spanish Proverb

Life without a friend is death without a witness. – Spanish Proverb

Lightning never strikes twice in the same place. – Spanish Proverb

Like a collier’s sack, bad without and worse within. – Spanish Proverb

Like a parakeet that says what he knows but doesn’t know what he says. – Spanish Proverb

Like Banbury tinkers that in mending one hole make three. – Spanish Proverb

Like blood, like good, and like age, make the happiest marriage. – Spanish Proverb

Like breeds like. – Spanish Proverb

Limit your desires and you will improve your health. – Spanish Proverb

Lip courtesy avails much and costs little. – Spanish Proverb

Listeners hear no good of themselves. – Spanish Proverb

Listeners never hear any good of themselves. – Spanish Proverb

Little and often fills the purse. – Spanish Proverb

Little beard, little modesty. – Spanish Proverb

Little bird, little nest. – Spanish Proverb

Little birds may pick a dead lion. – Spanish Proverb

Little birds that can sing and won’t sing must be made to sing. – Spanish Proverb

Little by little one goes far. – Spanish Proverb

Little strokes fell great oaks. – Spanish Proverb

Live and let live. There’s nothing so queer as folk. – Spanish Proverb

Live with wolves, and you learn to howl. – Spanish Proverb

Long absent, soon forgotten. – Spanish Proverb

Long life to the conqueror. – Spanish Proverb

Look after the pennies, and the pounds will look after themselves. – Spanish Proverb

Look for the good and let the bad things come on their own. – Spanish Proverb

Look for the good, and let the bad come on its own. – Spanish Proverb

Look not a gift horse in the mouth. – Spanish Proverb

Look not out for dead men’s shoes. – Spanish Proverb

Lose no rights, and commit no extortions. – Spanish Proverb

Losers are always in the wrong. – Spanish Proverb

Love and faith are seen in works. – Spanish Proverb

Love can do much, money can do everything. – Spanish Proverb

Love does much, money does everything. – Spanish Proverb

Love is like a mousetrap: you go in when you want, but you don’t get out when you like. – Spanish Proverb

Love is like war, begin when you like and leave off when you can. – Spanish Proverb

Love is like war: you begin when you like and leave off when you can. – Spanish Proverb

Love kills with golden arrows. – Spanish Proverb

Love laughs at locksmiths. – Spanish Proverb

Love me love my dog. – Spanish Proverb

Love one that does not love you, answer one that does not call you, and you will run a fruitless race. – Spanish Proverb

Love will find a way. – Spanish Proverb

Love, grief, and money cannot be kept secret. – Spanish Proverb

Love, pain, and money cannot be kept secret; they soon betray themselves. – Spanish Proverb

Lovers always think that other people are blind. – Spanish Proverb

Lovers quarrels are soon mended. – Spanish Proverb

Lovers think that others have no eyes. – Spanish Proverb

Luck comes to those who look after it. – Spanish Proverb

Lying and gossiping go hand in hand. – Spanish Proverb

Mad love–I for you, and you for another. – Spanish Proverb

Make a bridge of silver for the flying enemy. – Spanish Proverb

Make good flour, and do not blow the trumpet. – Spanish Proverb

Make sure you have many books and many friends—as long as they are good ones. – Spanish Proverb

Make way for a madman and a bull. – Spanish Proverb

Make your affairs known in the marketplace, and one will call them black and another white. – Spanish Proverb

Make your bargain before beginning to plow. – Spanish Proverb

Man cannot live by bread alone. – Spanish Proverb

Man is fire, woman is tow; the devil comes with a bellows. – Spanish Proverb

Man proposes, God disposes. – Spanish Proverb

Man punishes the action, but God the intention. – Spanish Proverb

Man, woman, and love created fire. – Spanish Proverb

Manana is often the busiest day of the week. – Spanish Proverb

Manual jokes are clown’s jokes. – Spanish Proverb

Manual play, clown’s play. – Spanish Proverb

Many hands make light work. – Spanish Proverb

Many kiss hands they would fain see chopped off. – Spanish Proverb

Many things grow in the garden that were never sown there. – Spanish Proverb

Marriage is a little bit like buying melons, you need a little luck. – Spanish Proverb

Marriage is a sack full of ninety-nine snakes and one eel. – Spanish Proverb

Married people need a home of their own. – Spanish Proverb

Marry you son when you will, and your daughter when you can. – Spanish Proverb

Marry, and grow tame. – Spanish Proverb

Mary Busybody never wants a bad day, and Mary Drone has God to give and bring to her. – Spanish Proverb

May God not so prosper our friends that they forget us. – Spanish Proverb

May the man be damned and never grow fat, Who wears two faces under one hat. – Spanish Proverb

Memory is everyone’s friend — it leaves you when you need it most. – Spanish Proverb

Memory is life’s clock. – Spanish Proverb

Men are just as God made them — and a little worse. – Spanish Proverb

Men can acquire knowledge, but not wisdom. Some of the greatest fools ever known were learned men. – Spanish Proverb

Michael is quits; he lost a ducat and gained a rabbit. – Spanish Proverb

Miguel, Miguel, you have no bees, and yet sell honey. – Spanish Proverb

Mildness governs more than anger. – Spanish Proverb

Milk the cow that standeth still. – Spanish Proverb

Mirrors were not made for the blind. – Spanish Proverb

Mischief comes by the pound and goes away by the ounce. – Spanish Proverb

Misers’ money goes twice to market. – Spanish Proverb

Misery loves company. – Spanish Proverb

Misfortunes always come in threes. These things always come in threes. – Spanish Proverb

Money gets money. – Spanish Proverb

Money goes where money is. – Spanish Proverb

Money soothes more than a gentleman’s words. – Spanish Proverb

Money turns bad into good. – Spanish Proverb

Money will do more than my lord’s letter. – Spanish Proverb

More grows in the garden than the gardener knows he has sown. – Spanish Proverb

More than enough is too much.

More things grow in the garden than the gardener sows. – Spanish Proverb

Moses does not play because he has not the means. – Spanish Proverb

Mother, marry me, marry me, or the gull will fly away with me. – Spanish Proverb

Mother, what is marrying? Spinning, bearing children, and crying, daughter. – Spanish Proverb

Much never cost little. – Spanish Proverb

Much pleasure and little grief is every man’s desire. – Spanish Proverb

Much talking, much erring. – Spanish Proverb

My daughter-in-law tucked up her sleeves, and upset the kettle into the fire. – Spanish Proverb

My gossips don’t like me because I tell them truths. – Spanish Proverb

My life and soul, but not my pack-saddle. – Spanish Proverb

My neighbour’s goat gives more milk than mine. – Spanish Proverb

My neighbour’s hen lays more eggs than mine. – Spanish Proverb

My sister’s son is a kinsman beyond dispute. – Spanish Proverb

My teeth are nearer than my kindred. – Spanish Proverb

My teeth before my relations. – Spanish Proverb

My word is my bond. – Spanish Proverb

Nae man can baith sup an’ blaw thegither. – Spanish Proverb

Name not a rope in his house that hanged himself. – Spanish Proverb

Necessity is the mother of invention. – Spanish Proverb

Need makes the old woman trot. – Spanish Proverb

Needle and thread are half clothing. – Spanish Proverb

Needs must when the devil drives. – Spanish Proverb

Neither a good friar for friend, nor a bad one for enemy. – Spanish Proverb

Neither handsome enough to kill, nor ugly enough to frighten. – Spanish Proverb

Neither serve one who has been a servant, nor beg of one who has been a beggar. – Spanish Proverb

Neither sign a paper without reading it, nor drink water without seeing it. – Spanish Proverb

Never advise a man to go to the wars, or to marry. – Spanish Proverb

Never advise anyone to go to war or to get married. Write down the advice of him who loves you, though you like it not at present. He that has no children brings them up well. – Spanish Proverb

Never advise someone to go to war or to get married. – Spanish Proverb

Never ask of him who has, but of him you know wishes you well. – Spanish Proverb

Never ask pardon before you are accused. – Spanish Proverb

Never beg from one who was a beggar. – Spanish Proverb

Never by-pass a town where a friend lives. – Spanish Proverb

Never give advice unasked. – Spanish Proverb

Never let a poor man advise you on investments. – Spanish Proverb

Never marry a widow unless her first husband was hanged. – Spanish Proverb

Never offer your hen for sale on a rainy day. – Spanish Proverb

Never praise life in front of death, nor the beautiful day in front of night. – Spanish Proverb

Never put off today what you can put off tomorrow. – Spanish Proverb

Never put your thumbs between two grinders. – Spanish Proverb

Never show the truth naked — just in its shirt. – Spanish Proverb

Never speak of a rope in the house of one who was hanged. – Spanish Proverb

Never spend your money before you have it. – Spanish Proverb

Never spread your corn to dry before the door of a saintly man. – Spanish Proverb

Never too late to do well. – Spanish Proverb

New loves drive out the old. – Spanish Proverb

New trappings to an old mule. – Spanish Proverb

Night brings counsel. – Spanish Proverb

No bees, no honey. – Spanish Proverb

No flies light on a boiling pot. – Spanish Proverb

No fly gets into a shut mouth. – Spanish Proverb

No Jew a fool; no hare lazy. – Spanish Proverb

No joy without alloy. – Spanish Proverb

No king was ever a traitor, or pope excommunicated. – Spanish Proverb

No man is quick enough to enjoy life to the full. – Spanish Proverb

No mirror ever reflected an ugly woman. – Spanish Proverb

No need to seek shelter for an old ox. – Spanish Proverb

No offense taken when none is meant. – Spanish Proverb

No one will notice in the dark. – Spanish Proverb

No one would be an innkeeper but for money. – Spanish Proverb

No relation is poor. – Spanish Proverb

No revenge is more honorable than the one not taken. – Spanish Proverb

No revenge is more honourable than the one not taken. – Spanish Proverb

No rogue like the godly rogue. – Spanish Proverb

No woman is ugly when she is dressed. – Spanish Proverb

No wonder if he breaks his head who stumbles twice over one stone. – Spanish Proverb

No work, no money. – Spanish Proverb

Nobody sows a thing that will not sell. – Spanish Proverb

None so deaf as he that will not hear. – Spanish Proverb

Not all things have to be scrutinized, nor all friends tested, not all enemies exposed and denounced. – Spanish Proverb

Not everyone who wears spurs owns a horse. – Spanish Proverb

Not he gives who likes, but who has. – Spanish Proverb

Not the cry, but the flight of the wild duck, leads the flock to fly and follow. – Spanish Proverb

Not to watch your workmen is to lose your money. – Spanish Proverb

Not to wish to recover is a mortal symptom. – Spanish Proverb

Nothing falls into the mouth of a sleeping fox. – Spanish Proverb

Nothing goes on for ever. – Spanish Proverb

Nothing is gained without taking risks. – Spanish Proverb

Nothing is lost on a journey by stopping to pray or to feed your horse. – Spanish Proverb

Nothing succeeds like success. – Spanish Proverb

Nothing venture, nothing have. – Spanish Proverb

Now that I have an ewe and a lamb, every one says to me: Good morrow, Peter. – Spanish Proverb

Nurse, you are mistress whilst the child sucks, and after that nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Of all pains, the greatest pain, is to love, but love in vain. – Spanish Proverb

Of brothers-in-law and red dogs few are good. – Spanish Proverb

Of evils, the least. – Spanish Proverb

Of other men’s leather large thongs. – Spanish Proverb

Of soups and loves the first are the best. – Spanish Proverb

Of the malady a man fears, he dies. – Spanish Proverb

Of two evils choose the least. – Spanish Proverb

Of what you see, believe very little, of what you are told, nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Of your wife and your tried friend believe nothing but what you know for certain. – Spanish Proverb

Old age is cruel for whores and magicians. – Spanish Proverb

Old as is the boat it may cross the ferry once. – Spanish Proverb

Old friends and old wine and old gold are best. – Spanish Proverb

Old reckonings breed new disputes. – Spanish Proverb

On a fool’s beard all learn to shave. – Spanish Proverb

On a hot day muffle yourself more. – Spanish Proverb

On a long journey, even a straw weighs heavy. – Spanish Proverb

On dry land even brackish water is good. – Spanish Proverb

Once a thief, always a thief. – Spanish Proverb

One ass among many monkeys is grinned at by all. – Spanish Proverb

One bee is better than a thousand flies. – Spanish Proverb

One can never know too much. – Spanish Proverb

One cannot blow and swallow at the same time. – Spanish Proverb

One cannot learn to swim in a field. – Spanish Proverb

One can’t ring the bells and walk in the procession. – Spanish Proverb

One drink is just right; two is too many; three are too few. – Spanish Proverb

One enemy is too many; and a hundred friends too few. – Spanish Proverb

One eye on the frying-pan and the other on the cat. – Spanish Proverb

One falsehood leads to another. – Spanish Proverb

One fool makes a hundred. – Spanish Proverb

One good forewit is worth two afterwits. – Spanish Proverb

One grievance borne, another follows. – Spanish Proverb

One hand washes the other, and both the face. – Spanish Proverb

One knavery is met by another. – Spanish Proverb

One love drives out another. – Spanish Proverb

One man beats the bush, another catcheth the bird. – Spanish Proverb

One man’s meat is another man’s poison. – Spanish Proverb

One man’s punishment is a deterrent to many. – Spanish Proverb

One should eat sand rather than fall to villainy. – Spanish Proverb

One starts the game and another bags it. – Spanish Proverb

One stroke on the nail and a hundred on the horseshoe. – Spanish Proverb

One swallow does not make a summer. – Spanish Proverb

One takes care of the horse, another rides it. – Spanish Proverb

One trick is met by another. – Spanish Proverb

One volunteer is worth two pressed men. – Spanish Proverb

One wedding brings another. – Spanish Proverb

One wolf does not bite another. – Spanish Proverb

One’s prog does not clog. – Spanish Proverb

Only God helps the badly dressed. – Spanish Proverb

Opportunity makes the thief. – Spanish Proverb

Opportunity never knocks twice at any man’s door. – Spanish Proverb

Opportunity only knocks once. – Spanish Proverb

Order and do it, and you will be rid of anxiety. – Spanish Proverb

Other folks’ cares kill the ass. – Spanish Proverb

Out of debt, out of danger. – Spanish Proverb

Out of love for the ox, the wolf licks the yoke. – Spanish Proverb

Out of sight out of mind. – Spanish Proverb

Out of the fullness of the heart the mouth speaks. – Spanish Proverb

Out of the fulness of the heart the mouth speaketh. – Spanish Proverb

Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee. – Spanish Proverb

Paid workmen have no arms. – Spanish Proverb

Painted flowers have no scent. – Spanish Proverb

Paper and ink and little justice. – Spanish Proverb

Patched trousers, healthy testicles. – Spanish Proverb

Patience begins with tears and ends with a smile. – Spanish Proverb

Patience, time, and money accommodate all things. – Spanish Proverb

Pay me back what you owe me; we’ll talk later about what I owe you. – Spanish Proverb

Pay what you owe, and be cured of your complaint. – Spanish Proverb

Peace and patience, and death with penitence. – Spanish Proverb

People are the architects of their own fortune. – Spanish Proverb

Peralvillo justice: hang a man first and try him afterwards. – Spanish Proverb

Perseverance kills the game. – Spanish Proverb

Peter is so godly that God does not improve his condition. – Spanish Proverb

Peter pinches me, and I like it. – Spanish Proverb

Play with an ass and he will flirt his tail in your face. – Spanish Proverb

Play with the fool at home, and he will play with you abroad. – Spanish Proverb

Play’s gude, while it is play. – Spanish Proverb

Please the eye, and pick the purse. – Spanish Proverb

Please your eye and plague your heart. – Spanish Proverb

Plenty breed pride. – Spanish Proverb

Plough deep and you will have plenty of corn. – Spanish Proverb

Plough deep whilst sluggards sleep, And you shall have corn to sell and to keep. – Spanish Proverb

Plough or not plough, you must pay your rent. – Spanish Proverb

Plough wet or dry, and you will not have to kiss your neighbour’s breech. – Spanish Proverb

Pluck it from among the thistles, and we will take it off your hands. – Spanish Proverb

Possession and good right, with lance in hand. – Spanish Proverb

Pound the garlic, Pedro, whilst I grate the cheese. – Spanish Proverb

Pour not water on a drowned mouse. – Spanish Proverb

Poverty breeds discontent. – Spanish Proverb

Poverty does not destroy virtue, nor does wealth bestow it. – Spanish Proverb

Poverty is even worse if you have to sleep on the edge of a crowded bed. – Spanish Proverb

Poverty is no sin, but it is a branch of roguery. – Spanish Proverb

Poverty is not a crime. – Spanish Proverb

Practice makes perfect. – Spanish Proverb

Praise yourself, basket, for I want to sell you. – Spanish Proverb

Pray to God, but hammer away. – Spanish Proverb

Prison and Lent were made for the poor. – Spanish Proverb

Problems don’t seem so bad if you keep cheerful. – Spanish Proverb

Procrastination is the thief of time. – Spanish Proverb

Prosperity forgets father and mother. – Spanish Proverb

Punishment is a cripple, but it arrives. – Spanish Proverb

Put a beggar into your barn and he will make himself your heir. – Spanish Proverb

Raise ravens and they will peck our your eye. – Spanish Proverb

Rather mulberry than almond. – Spanish Proverb

Rats do not play tricks with kittens. – Spanish Proverb

Renounce the devil, and thou shalt wear a shabby coat. – Spanish Proverb

Repentance costs dear. – Spanish Proverb

Repentance for silence is better than repentance for speaking. – Spanish Proverb

Retreating is not the same as fleeing. – Spanish Proverb

Right or wrong, God aid our purpose. – Spanish Proverb

Right or wrong, ’tis our house up to the roof. – Spanish Proverb

Right overstrained turns to wrong. – Spanish Proverb

Rise early and watch, labour and catch. – Spanish Proverb

Said the frying pay to the kettle, Stand off, black bottom. – Spanish Proverb

Salt split is never all gathered. – Spanish Proverb

Say before they say. – Spanish Proverb

Say nothing when you are giving—only say something when you are receiving. – Spanish Proverb

Say nothing when you give — only when you receive. – Spanish Proverb

Seat yourself in your place and you will not be made to quit it. – Spanish Proverb

Secret of patience is to do something else in the meantime. – Spanish Proverb

See how he has risen from a mayor to a hangman. – Spanish Proverb

See that you tie so that you can untie. – Spanish Proverb

See to it that you have many books and many friends — but be sure they are good ones. – Spanish Proverb

See, hear, and hold your tongue. – Spanish Proverb

Self-knowledge is the beginning of self-improvement. – Spanish Proverb

Sell publicly and buy privately. – Spanish Proverb

Sense comes with age. – Spanish Proverb

Servants make the worst masters. – Spanish Proverb

Serve a lord and you’ll know what is grief. – Spanish Proverb

Set a peasant on horseback, and he forgets both God and man. – Spanish Proverb

Set a sprat to catch a mackerel. – Spanish Proverb

Set a thief to catch a thief. – Spanish Proverb

Seven brothers in a council make wrong right. – Spanish Proverb

Seven is company, and nine confusion. – Spanish Proverb

She is fond of greens who kisses the gardener. – Spanish Proverb

She is good and honoured who is dead and buried. – Spanish Proverb

She is good who is close to the fire and does not burn. – Spanish Proverb

She is nether fish nor fowl. – Spanish Proverb

She is well married who has neither mother-in-law nor sister-in-law. – Spanish Proverb

She stoops to conquer. – Spanish Proverb

She who loves an ugly man thinks him handsome. – Spanish Proverb

Shoemaker stick to your last. – Spanish Proverb

Shoemakers go to mass and pray that sheep may die. – Spanish Proverb

Shoot at a pigeon and kill a crow. – Spanish Proverb

Short hose must have long points. – Spanish Proverb

Shut your door, and you will make your neighbour a good woman. – Spanish Proverb

Shyness is the prison of the heart. – Spanish Proverb

Sickly women live longer. – Spanish Proverb

Silence and look out, we shall catch both hen and chicks. – Spanish Proverb

Silent water is dangerous water. – Spanish Proverb

Silly sheep, where one goes, all go. – Spanish Proverb

Since I wronged you, I have never liked you. – Spanish Proverb

Since the house is on fire, let us warm ourselves. – Spanish Proverb

Since we cannot get what we like, let us like what we can get. – Spanish Proverb

Since we have loaves let us not look for cakes. – Spanish Proverb

Since you have scolding me, I have counted a hundred and twenty holes in that nutmeg grater. – Spanish Proverb

Skilled hands eat trouts. – Spanish Proverb

Sleep is the best cure for waking troubles. – Spanish Proverb

Sleep over it, and you will come to a resolution. – Spanish Proverb

Sloth is the key to poverty. – Spanish Proverb

Sloth is the mother of poverty. – Spanish Proverb

Slow but sure. – Spanish Proverb

Slow help is no help. – Spanish Proverb

Small choice in rotten apples. – Spanish Proverb

Smoke, a dripping roof, and a scolding wife, are enough to drive a man out of his life. – Spanish Proverb

So money gets money. – Spanish Proverb

So wise, so young, they say, do ne’er live long. – Spanish Proverb

So you tell me there are wolves on the mountain, and foxes in the valley. – Spanish Proverb

So yourself be good, a fig for your grandfather. – Spanish Proverb

Soft and fair goes far. – Spanish Proverb

Some day Peter will command as much as his master. – Spanish Proverb

Some go to law, for the wagging of a straw. – Spanish Proverb

Some have the fame, and other card the wool. – Spanish Proverb

Sometimes the remedy is worse than the disease. – Spanish Proverb

Sorrows are valuable treasures that you only show to your friends. – Spanish Proverb

Soup must be hot — insults cold. – Spanish Proverb

Sour wine, old bacon, and rye bread keep a house rich. – Spanish Proverb

Sow corn in clay, and plant vines in sand. – Spanish Proverb

Sow dry and set wet. – Spanish Proverb

Sow much, reap much; sow little, reap little. – Spanish Proverb

Spanish is the language of lovers, Italian is for the singer, French for diplomats, and German for horses. – Spanish Proverb

Speak not ill of the year until it is past. – Spanish Proverb

Speak not of my debts unless you mean to pay them. – Spanish Proverb

Speaking without thinking is shooting without taking aim. – Spanish Proverb

Spilled wine is a sign of happiness, but break the bed and all will have long faces. – Spanish Proverb

Spring is in the air. The sap rises in the spring. – Spanish Proverb

Stars are not seen by sunshine. – Spanish Proverb

Stealing would be a nice thing, if thieves were hanged by the girdle. – Spanish Proverb

Steel whets steel. – Spanish Proverb

Store is no sore. – Spanish Proverb

Stubborn men make lawyers. – Spanish Proverb

Such awkward things will happen as going into the great square and coming back without ears. – Spanish Proverb

Sugared words generally prove bitter. – Spanish Proverb

Suppers have killed more than doctors have ever cured. – Spanish Proverb

Take away the motive, and the sin is taken away. – Spanish Proverb

Take hold lightly; let go lightly. This is one of the great secrets of felicity in love. – Spanish Proverb

Take hold of a good minute. – Spanish Proverb

Take in laundry before you take in partners. – Spanish Proverb

Take no notice of the stupid things people say. – Spanish Proverb

Take the middle of the way and thou wilt not fall. – Spanish Proverb

Take the will for the deed. – Spanish Proverb

Take what you want, God said to man, and pay for it. – Spanish Proverb

Take what you want, then pay for it. – Spanish Proverb

Taking out and not putting in soon reaches the bottom. – Spanish Proverb

Talk as you go, husband, to the gallows. – Spanish Proverb

Talk little and well, and you will be looked upon as somebody. – Spanish Proverb

Talk much, and err much. – Spanish Proverb

Talk of sporting, and buy game in the market. – Spanish Proverb

Talking about bulls is altogether different from being in the arena. 

Talking about bulls is not the same thing as being in the bullring. – Spanish Proverb

Talking is easy, action difficult. – Spanish Proverb

Talking is easy, action is difficult. – Spanish Proverb

Talking of bulls is not the same as being in the bullring. – Spanish Proverb

Tell a lie and find the truth. – Spanish Proverb

Tell a lie, and you will bring out the truth. – Spanish Proverb

Tell her she is handsome, and you will turn her head. – Spanish Proverb

Tell it her once, and the devil will tell it her ten times. – Spanish Proverb

Tell it well, or say nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Tell me the company you keep, and I will tell you who you are. – Spanish Proverb

Tell me who you live with and I will tell you who you are. – Spanish Proverb

Tell me who you live with, and I will tell you who you are. – Spanish Proverb

Tell not all you know, nor judge of all you see, if you would live in peace. – Spanish Proverb

Tell your affairs in the market-place, and one will call them black and another white. – Spanish Proverb

Tell your friend a lie — and if he keeps it a secret, tell him the truth. – Spanish Proverb

Tell your friend a lie; and if he keeps it secret, tell him the truth. – Spanish Proverb

Tell your friend your secret, and he will set his foot on your neck. – Spanish Proverb

Tell your own story first. – Spanish Proverb

That which covers thee discovers thee. – Spanish Proverb

That which is cheap is dear. – Spanish Proverb

That’s a wise delay which makes the road safe. – Spanish Proverb

The absent are always at fault. – Spanish Proverb

The absent were never in the right. – Spanish Proverb

The account is correct, but not a sixpense appears. – Spanish Proverb

The act of treachery is liked, but not he that does it. – Spanish Proverb

The advice of foxes is dangerous for chickens. – Spanish Proverb

The ant gets wings that she may perish sooner. – Spanish Proverb

The archer that shoots badly has a lie ready. – Spanish Proverb

The art of doing business lies more in paying than in buying. – Spanish Proverb

The ass dead, the barley at his tail. – Spanish Proverb

The ass knows well in whose face be brays. – Spanish Proverb

The ass of many owners is food for wolves. – Spanish Proverb

The bachelor is a peacock, the fiance is a lion and the married man a mule. – Spanish Proverb

The bacon of paradise for the married man that does not repent. – Spanish Proverb

The bad barber leaves neither hair nor skin. – Spanish Proverb

The bad man always suspects knavery. – Spanish Proverb

The bath has sworn not to whiten the blackamoor. – Spanish Proverb

The beast that goes well is never without some one to try his paces. – Spanish Proverb

The beginning of health is to know the disease. – Spanish Proverb

The bell does not go to mass, and yet calls every one to it. – Spanish Proverb

The best cast at dice is not to play. – Spanish Proverb

The best cloth has uneven threads. – Spanish Proverb

The best cook drops a whole tomato. – Spanish Proverb

The best feed of a horse is his master’s eye. – Spanish Proverb

The best mirror is an old friend. – Spanish Proverb

The best or the worst for a man is his wife. – Spanish Proverb

The best way to solve a problem is to attack the cause of it. – Spanish Proverb

The best word still has to be spoken. – Spanish Proverb

The better day the better deed. – Spanish Proverb

The body of the pope takes up no more room than the sexton’s. – Spanish Proverb

The bow that is always bent slackens or breaks. – Spanish Proverb

The bowels support the heart, and not the heart the bowels. – Spanish Proverb

The boy is father to the man. – Spanish Proverb

The brain, that sows not corn, plants thistles. – Spanish Proverb

The bread eaten, the company departs. – Spanish Proverb

The bread never falls but on its buttered side. – Spanish Proverb

The busy fly is in every man’s dish. – Spanish Proverb

The busy man is troubled with but one devil, the idle man by a thousand. – Spanish Proverb

The buyer has need of a hundred eyes. the seller but one. – Spanish Proverb

The buyer needs a hundred eyes, the seller but one. – Spanish Proverb

The cask full, the mother-in-law drunk. – Spanish Proverb

The cask smells of the wine it contains. – Spanish Proverb

The cat always leaves her mark upon her friend. – Spanish Proverb

The cat is friendly, but scratches. – Spanish Proverb

The chickens have come home to roost. You’re suffering the consequences now. – Spanish Proverb

The child is the father of the man. – Spanish Proverb

The church, the sea, or the royal household, for whoever would thrive. – Spanish Proverb

The cross on his breast, and the devil in his heart. – Spanish Proverb

The day I did not make my toilette, there came to my house one I did not expect. – Spanish Proverb

The day I did not sweep the house, there came to it one I did not expect. – Spanish Proverb

The day you marry ’tis either kill or cure. – Spanish Proverb

The day you marry, it is either kill or cure. – Spanish Proverb

The dead and the absent have no friends. – Spanish Proverb

The dead open the eyes of the living. – Spanish Proverb

The dearest child of all is the dead one. – Spanish Proverb

The deceived sheep that went for wool and came back shorn. – Spanish Proverb

The devil climbs the bell tower in a priest’s cassock. – Spanish Proverb

The devil gets into the belfry by the vicar’s skirts. – Spanish Proverb

The devil hides behind the cross. – Spanish Proverb

The devil is so fond of his son that he put out his eye. – Spanish Proverb

The devil looks after himself. – Spanish Proverb

The devil lurks behind the cross. – Spanish Proverb

The devil makes his Christmas pies of lawyers’ tongues and clerk’s fingers. – Spanish Proverb

The devil turns away from a closed door. – Spanish Proverb

The die is cast. – Spanish Proverb

The dog that has its bitch in town never barks well. – Spanish Proverb

The dog that kills wolves, is killed by wolves. – Spanish Proverb

The dog wags his tail, not for you, but for your bread. – Spanish Proverb

The dress does not make the friar. – Spanish Proverb

The drowning man is not troubled by rain. – Spanish Proverb

The drunkard and the glutton come to poverty, and drowsiness clothes a man with rags. – Spanish Proverb

The early bird catches the worm. – Spanish Proverb

The earth hides as it takes, the physician’s mistakes. – Spanish Proverb

The earth produces all things and receives all again. – Spanish Proverb

The empty purse says she is made of leather. – Spanish Proverb

The envious man’s face grows sharp and his eyes big. – Spanish Proverb

The epicure puts his purse into his belly. – Spanish Proverb

The evil which issues from thy mouth falls into thy bosom. – Spanish Proverb

The evil wound is cured, but not the evil name. – Spanish Proverb

The exception proves the rule. – Spanish Proverb

The exception which proves the rule. – Spanish Proverb

The eye of the master fattens the steed. – Spanish Proverb

The father a saint, the son a sinner. – Spanish Proverb

The father of a saint, the son of a sinner. – Spanish Proverb

The fault is as great as he that commits it. – Spanish Proverb

The fear of women is the basis of good health. – Spanish Proverb

The feast passes and the fool remains. – Spanish Proverb

The fertile field becomes sterile without rest. – Spanish Proverb

The fierce ox becomes tame on strange ground. – Spanish Proverb

The fire well knows whose cloak burns. – Spanish Proverb

The first drink with water, the second without water, the third like water. – Spanish Proverb

The first duty of a soldier is obedience. – Spanish Proverb

The first faults are theirs that commit them, the second theirs that permit them. – Spanish Proverb

The first one to eat, the last one to work. – Spanish Proverb

The first wife is a broom, and the second a lady. – Spanish Proverb

The fist loss is the best. – Spanish Proverb

The foolish sayings of a rich man pass for wise ones. – Spanish Proverb

The fox does not do as much mischief in a year as it pays for in an hour. – Spanish Proverb

The fox is knowing, but more knowing he who catches him. – Spanish Proverb

The fox knows a lot, but a woman in love knows even more. – Spanish Proverb

The fox knows well with whom he plays tricks. – Spanish Proverb

The fox that tarries long is on the watch for prey. – Spanish Proverb

The friar who begs for God begs for two. – Spanish Proverb

The friar who prays in god’s name prays for two. – Spanish Proverb

The full-fed cow makes company of her tail. – Spanish Proverb

The full-fed sheep is frightened at its own tail. – Spanish Proverb

The gallows takes its own. – Spanish Proverb

The gallows was made for the unlucky. – Spanish Proverb

The gallows will have its own at last. – Spanish Proverb

The gardener’s dog neither eats greens not lets any one else eat them. – Spanish Proverb

The gardener’s feet do no harm to the garden. – Spanish Proverb

The gentle lamb sucks any ewe as well as its mother; the surly lamb sucks neither its own nor another. – Spanish Proverb

The girl as she is taught, the flax as it is wrought. – Spanish Proverb

The glass-dealer’s horses fell out, and he looked on to see which kicked hardest. – Spanish Proverb

The goat can’t well cover herself with her tail. – Spanish Proverb

The golden ass passes everywhere. – Spanish Proverb

The gossips fall out and tell each other truths. – Spanish Proverb

The grapes are sour, said the fox, when he could not get at them. – Spanish Proverb

The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. – Spanish Proverb

The grass looks greener on the other side of the fence. – Spanish Proverb

The greatest hate springs from the greatest love. – Spanish Proverb

The greatest victory is a bloodless victory. – Spanish Proverb

The green burns for the dry, and the righteous pay for sinners. – Spanish Proverb

The grey mare is the better horse. – Spanish Proverb

The greyhound that starts many hares kills none. – Spanish Proverb

The gutter by dropping wears the stone. – Spanish Proverb

The hare starts from where it is least expected. – Spanish Proverb

The heart is like the astrologer who guesses at the truth. – Spanish Proverb

The heart is no traitor. – Spanish Proverb

The hen lays upon an egg. – Spanish Proverb

The higher the rise the greater the fall. – Spanish Proverb

The highest branch is not the safest roost. – Spanish Proverb

The hole invites the thief. – Spanish Proverb

The honest man enjoys the theft. – Spanish Proverb

The horse may wish to do one thing, but he who saddles him another. – Spanish Proverb

The horse thinks one thing, and his rider another. – Spanish Proverb

The horseshoe that clatters wants a nail. – Spanish Proverb

The hunchback does not see his own hump, but sees his companion’s. – Spanish Proverb

The Jew ruins himself with passovers, the Moor with wedding feasts, and the Christian with lawsuits. – Spanish Proverb

The judge’s son goes into the courtroom without fear. – Spanish Proverb

The keys at the girdle, the dog in the larder. – Spanish Proverb

The king goes as far as he can, not so far as he would. – Spanish Proverb

The king goes as far as he may, not as far as he could. – Spanish Proverb

The king likes the treachery, but not the traitor. – Spanish Proverb

The kite’s malady, its wings broken and its beak sound. – Spanish Proverb

The land a man knows is his mother. – Spanish Proverb

The lazy man always does twice the work. – Spanish Proverb

The lazy servant to save one step takes eight. – Spanish Proverb

The leader follows in front. – Spanish Proverb

The lean dog is all fleas. – Spanish Proverb

The letter enters with blood. – Spanish Proverb

The liar is sooner caught than the cripple. – Spanish Proverb

The lion is not so fierce as he is painted. – Spanish Proverb

The lion’s not half so fierce as he’s painted. – Spanish Proverb

The loyal man lives no longer than the traitor pleases. – Spanish Proverb

The lucky man has a daughter for his first-born. – Spanish Proverb

The magistrate’s son gets out of every scrape. – Spanish Proverb

The man deliberates, the woman decides. – Spanish Proverb

The man who does not love a horse cannot love a woman. – Spanish Proverb

The mare’s kick does not harm the colt. – Spanish Proverb

The mare’s kicks are caresses to the horse. – Spanish Proverb

The master’s foot is manure for the estate. – Spanish Proverb

The mice will never play with the kittens. – Spanish Proverb

The mill does not grind with water that is past. – Spanish Proverb

The mill gains by gong, and not by standing still. – Spanish Proverb

The miser will stubbornly live poorly in order to die rich. – Spanish Proverb

The month loses its own, but not the year. – Spanish Proverb

The more a woman admires her face, the more she ruins her house. – Spanish Proverb

The more danger, the more honor. – Spanish Proverb

The more haste, the less speed. – Spanish Proverb

The more one has the more one wants. – Spanish Proverb

The more riches a fool hath, the greater fool he is. – Spanish Proverb

The more you court a clown the statelier he grows. – Spanish Proverb

The more you flatter a fool, the more seriously he plays his game. – Spanish Proverb

The more you get the more you want. – Spanish Proverb

The most cautious passes for the most chaste. – Spanish Proverb

The most faithful mirror is an old friend. – Spanish Proverb

The Mother of God appears to fools. – Spanish Proverb

The mother of mischief is no bigger than a midge’s wing. – Spanish Proverb

The mother reckons well, but the child reckons better. – Spanish Proverb

The mother who spoils her child, fattens a serpent. – Spanish Proverb

The mother-in-law does not remember that she was once a daughter-in-law. – Spanish Proverb

The mother-in-law must be entreated, and the pot must be let stand. – Spanish Proverb

The mountain labored and brought forth a mouse. – Spanish Proverb

The mouse does not leave the cat’s house with a bellyful. – Spanish Proverb

The mouse that knows but one hole is soon caught by the cat. – Spanish Proverb

The mouse that only trusts to one poor hole, Can never be a mouse of any soul. – Spanish Proverb

The mouth and the purse, shut. – Spanish Proverb

The mouth that says yes says no. – Spanish Proverb

The nightingale will run out of songs before a woman runs out of conversation. – Spanish Proverb

The oaths of one who loves a woman are not to be believed. – Spanish Proverb

The obscure we see eventually; the completely apparent takes longer. – Spanish Proverb

The official who can’t lie may as well be out of the world. – Spanish Proverb

The old for want of ability, and the young for want of knowledge, let things be lost. – Spanish Proverb

The old man at home, and the young abroad, lie after the same fashion. – Spanish Proverb

The old wife, if she does not serve for a pot, serves for a cover. – Spanish Proverb

The one who rings the fire bell is safe. – Spanish Proverb

The one-eyed man is a king in the country of the blind. – Spanish Proverb

The only chaste woman is the one who has not been asked. – Spanish Proverb

The open house makes a good man of the thief. – Spanish Proverb

The ox comes to the yoke at the call of his feeder. – Spanish Proverb

The ox spoke and said “Moo.” – Spanish Proverb

The ox that butted me tossed me into a good place. – Spanish Proverb

The ox without a bell is soon lost. – Spanish Proverb

The patient who names a doctor his heir makes a big mistake. – Spanish Proverb

The paunch warm, the foot sleepy. – Spanish Proverb

The pearls of a bride on her wedding day are the tears that will be shed later. – Spanish Proverb

The pen is mightier than the sword. – Spanish Proverb

The person seeking India’s riches must have them within himself. – Spanish Proverb

The person that makes one basket can make a hundred. – Spanish Proverb

The person who plants the lettuce does not always eat the salad. – Spanish Proverb

The pig’s tail will never make a good arrow. – Spanish Proverb

The pitcher goes so often to the well, that it leaves its handle or its mouth. – Spanish Proverb

The pitcher that goes often to the well leaves either its handle or its spout there. – Spanish Proverb

The poor man has his crop destroyed by hail every year. – Spanish Proverb

The poor writer blames the pen. – Spanish Proverb

The poor-houses are filled with the honestest people. – Spanish Proverb

The proof of the pudding is in the eating. – Spanish Proverb

The rat that has but one hole is soon caught. – Spanish Proverb

The rat that knows but one hole is soon caught by the cat. – Spanish Proverb

The rich man transgresses the law, and the poor man is punished. – Spanish Proverb

The righteous man sins before an open chest. – Spanish Proverb

The road of “about,” leads only to the house of “never.” Near the spring nobody dies of thirst. – Spanish Proverb

the rotten apple spoils its companion. – Spanish Proverb

The scalded cat dreads cold water. – Spanish Proverb

The secret in swimming is to know how to take care of your clothes. – Spanish Proverb

The secret of patience is to do something else in the meantime. – Spanish Proverb

The secret of two no further will go; the secret of three a hundred will know. – Spanish Proverb

The servant wench that has a mother in town swoons seven times a day. – Spanish Proverb

The sharper soon cheats the covetous man. – Spanish Proverb

The sharper the storm, the sooner it’s over. – Spanish Proverb

The sheep that bleats loses a mouthful. – Spanish Proverb

The shirt is nearer than the frock. – Spanish Proverb

The shoemaker’s son always goes barefoot. – Spanish Proverb

The smith’s dog sleeps at the noise of the hammer, and wakes at the grinding of teeth. – Spanish Proverb

The snail, to be rid of annoyances, bartered its eyes for horns. – Spanish Proverb

The snake that seduced Eve spoke Spanish. – Spanish Proverb

The son of an ass brays twice a day. – Spanish Proverb

The spider’s web lets the rat escape and catches the fly. – Spanish Proverb

The spoken word sometimes loses what silence has won. – Spanish Proverb

The spot will come out in the washing. – Spanish Proverb

The squeaking wheel gets the grease. – Spanish Proverb

The stew mixed by many is ill-seasoned and worse cooked. – Spanish Proverb

The stew that boils much loses flavour. – Spanish Proverb

The stolen ox sometimes puts his head out of the stall. – Spanish Proverb

The stone is hard and the drop is small, but a hole is made by the constant fall. – Spanish Proverb

The sword and the ring according to the hand that bears them. – Spanish Proverb

The thief thinks that all are like himself. – Spanish Proverb

The thorn comes into the world point foremost. – Spanish Proverb

The thread breaks where it is thinnest. – Spanish Proverb

The threatener loses the opportunity of vengeance. – Spanish Proverb

The threshold says nothing but what it hears of the hinge. – Spanish Proverb

The tide will fetch away what the ebb brings. – Spanish Proverb

The tiger that has once tasted blood is never sated with the taste of it. – Spanish Proverb

The tired ox plants his foot firmly. – Spanish Proverb

The tongue goes to where the tooth aches. – Spanish Proverb

The tongue of a bad friend cuts more than a knife. – Spanish Proverb

The treason pleases, but the traitors are odious. – Spanish Proverb

The Truth will out. – Spanish Proverb

The turd is proud that the river will carry it. – Spanish Proverb

The voice of the people is the voice of God. – Spanish Proverb

The wages of sin is death. – Spanish Proverb

The wedding feast is not made with mushrooms only. – Spanish Proverb

The well-bred hound, if he does not hunt to-day will hunt to-morrow. – Spanish Proverb

The well-dressed woman draws her husband away from another woman’s door. – Spanish Proverb

The well-fed sheep makes a cloak of its tail. – Spanish Proverb

The wind changes every day; a woman changes every second. – Spanish Proverb

The winter is gone, the spring is come, a fly for those who us good have done. – Spanish Proverb

The wise hand does not all that the tongue says. – Spanish Proverb

The wise knows that he does not know; the ignoramus thinks he knows. – Spanish Proverb

The wise man does not hang his knowledge on a hook. – Spanish Proverb

The wolf and the fox are both in one story. – Spanish Proverb

The wolf changes his teeth but not his disposition. – Spanish Proverb

The wolf commits no mischief at home. – Spanish Proverb

The wolf does that in the course of the week which hinders him from going to mass on Sunday. – Spanish Proverb

The wolf eats of what is counted. – Spanish Proverb

The wolf loses his teeth, but not his inclinations. – Spanish Proverb

The wolf never wants a pretext against the lamb. – Spanish Proverb

The wolf picks up the ass’s fleas by moonlight. – Spanish Proverb

The woman in finery, the house in filth, but the doorway swept. – Spanish Proverb

The woman who dresses well attracts the husband from another woman’s door. – Spanish Proverb

The world is a round gulf, and he who cannot swim must go to the bottom. – Spanish Proverb

The worst ewe dungs in the milking-pail. – Spanish Proverb

The worst of a lawsuit is that out of one there grow a hundred. – Spanish Proverb

The worst pig gets the best acorn. – Spanish Proverb

The wrath of brothers is the wrath of devils. – Spanish Proverb

The wrong doer is never without a pretext. – Spanish Proverb

There are all honest men, but my cloak is not to be found. – Spanish Proverb

There are eyes that fall in love with bleared ones. – Spanish Proverb

There are more threatened than hurt. – Spanish Proverb

There are no birds in last year’s nest. – Spanish Proverb

There are plenty more fish in the sea. – Spanish Proverb

There are three “too much” and three “too little” that can bring a fool down: too much spending and too little money; too much talking and too little knowledge; and too much boasting and too little earnings. – Spanish Proverb

There is a great art in selling the wind. – Spanish Proverb

There is a remedy for everything except death. – Spanish Proverb

There is little use in watching a bad woman. – Spanish Proverb

There is luck in leisure. – Spanish Proverb

There is luck in odd numbers. – Spanish Proverb

There is measure in all things. – Spanish Proverb

There is mony a true tale tauld in jest. – Spanish Proverb

There is never a great dunghill at a sportsman’s door. – Spanish Proverb

There is no answer for God out of my house, and What have you to do with my wife? – Spanish Proverb

There is no beast so savage but sports with its mate. – Spanish Proverb

There is no better patch than one off the same cloth. – Spanish Proverb

There is no better surgeon than one with many scars. – Spanish Proverb

There is no choicer morsel than that which is stolen. – Spanish Proverb

There is no disinterested gift. – Spanish Proverb

There is no happiness; there are only moments of happiness. – Spanish Proverb

There is no house without its hush. hush. – Spanish Proverb

There is no lock, if the pick is of gold. – Spanish Proverb

There is no mother like the mother that bore us. – Spanish Proverb

There is no pleasure but palls, and the more so if it costs nothing. – Spanish Proverb

There is no pot so ugly but finds its cover. – Spanish Proverb

There is no remedy for death, but death itself is a remedy. – Spanish Proverb

There is no such witness as a good measure of wine. – Spanish Proverb

There is no tax upon lying. – Spanish Proverb

There is no thief without a receiver. – Spanish Proverb

There is no woman who sleeps so deeply that the sound of a guitar won’t bring her to the window. – Spanish Proverb

There is no worse apprentice than the one who doesn’t want to know. – Spanish Proverb

There is no worse joke than a true one. – Spanish Proverb

There is not a pair of ears for every Jew. – Spanish Proverb

There is nothing like deprivation to generate thanks for small mercies. – Spanish Proverb

There is some distance between Peter and Peter. – Spanish Proverb

There is truth in wine. – Spanish Proverb

There was already twenty in the family, so my grandmother had a baby. 

There wasn’t a sound to be heard. You could have heard a pin drop. – Spanish Proverb

There would be no ill word if it were not ill taken. – Spanish Proverb

There’s honor among thieves. – Spanish Proverb

There’s no accounting for taste. – Spanish Proverb

There’s no argument like that of the stick. – Spanish Proverb

There’s no making a good cloak of bad cloth. – Spanish Proverb

There’s no smoke without fire. – Spanish Proverb

There’s no substitute for experience. – Spanish Proverb

There’s nothing so queer as folk. – Spanish Proverb

They are rich who have friends. – Spanish Proverb

They may whip me in the market-place, so it be not known at home. – Spanish Proverb

They took away the mirror from me because I was ugly, and gave it to the blind woman. – Spanish Proverb

They turn night into day. – Spanish Proverb

They two agreed like two cats in a gutter. – Spanish Proverb

They whip the cat, if our mistress does not spin. – Spanish Proverb

They who don’t keep goats and yet sell kids, where do they get them? – Spanish Proverb

They who don’t kill pigs must not expect black-puddings. – Spanish Proverb

Things often happen when you least expect them to. Where we least think, there goes the hare away. – Spanish Proverb

This is the milkmaid’s tale. – Spanish Proverb

Though my father-in-law is a good man, I do not like a dog with a bell. – Spanish Proverb

Though the speaker be a fool, let the hearer be wise. – Spanish Proverb

Though the sun shines, leave not your cloak at home. – Spanish Proverb

Though you are a prudent old man, do not despise counsel. – Spanish Proverb

Though you see me with this coat, I have another up the mountain. – Spanish Proverb

Though your bloodhound be gentle, don’t bite him on the lip. – Spanish Proverb

Threatened men eat bread. – Spanish Proverb

Threatened men live long. – Spanish Proverb

Three daughters and their mother, four devils for the father. – Spanish Proverb

Three men helping one another will do as much as six men singly. – Spanish Proverb

Three Spaniards, four opinions. – Spanish Proverb

Three strikes and you are out. – Spanish Proverb

Three things are not to be trusted; a cow’s horn, a dog’s tooth, and a horse’s hoof. – Spanish Proverb

Three things kill a man: a scorching son, suppers, and cares. – Spanish Proverb

Three things must epigrams, like bees, have all, A sting, and honey, and a body small. – Spanish Proverb

Three who held each other are as good as six. – Spanish Proverb

Through not spending enough we spend too much. – Spanish Proverb

Throw that bone to another dog. – Spanish Proverb

Throwing your cap at a bird is not the way to catch it. – Spanish Proverb

Tie up the hen that eats at your place and lays eggs elsewhere. – Spanish Proverb

Time and I against any two. – Spanish Proverb

Time and tide wait for no man. – Spanish Proverb

To a depraved taste sweet is bitter. – Spanish Proverb

To a hard knot a hard wedge. – Spanish Proverb

To a hasty demand a leisure reply. – Spanish Proverb

To a son-in-law and a hog you need show the way but once. – Spanish Proverb

To a woman and a magpie tell your secrets in the marketplace. – Spanish Proverb

To be a merchant, the art consists more in getting paid than in making sales. – Spanish Proverb

To be like the esquire of Guadalaxara, who knew nothing in the morning of what he said at night. – Spanish Proverb

To be like the tailor of Campillo, who worked for nothing, and found thread. – Spanish Proverb

To beards with money cavaliers pay respect. – Spanish Proverb

To change one’s mind is rather a sign of prudence than ignorance. – Spanish Proverb

To deny all, is to confess all. – Spanish Proverb

To deny everything is to confess everything. – Spanish Proverb

To drunken mothers-in-law give full jugs. – Spanish Proverb

To eat and to scratch one has but to begin. – Spanish Proverb

To err is human, to forgive divine. – Spanish Proverb

To every evil doer his evil day. – Spanish Proverb

To find oneself in tight breeches. – Spanish Proverb

To flee and to run are not all one. – Spanish Proverb

To forget a wrong is the best revenge. – Spanish Proverb

To friend and foe alike I tell them how bad she is, so that I don’t have to share her with anyone. – Spanish Proverb

To give is honour, to love is grief. – Spanish Proverb

To give too much when little is asked is a form of refusal. – Spanish Proverb

To him that watches, everything is revealed. – Spanish Proverb

To him who gives you a capon you may spare a leg and a wing. – Spanish Proverb

To lather an ass’s head is only wasting soap. – Spanish Proverb

To lie and eat fish demand a lot of skill. – Spanish Proverb

To live in fear is a life half-lived. – Spanish Proverb

To love and be wise is impossible. – Spanish Proverb

To mad words deaf ears. – Spanish Proverb

To offer friendship to one who is looking for love, is like giving bread to someone dying of thirst. – Spanish Proverb

To own is to fear. – Spanish Proverb

To swim and swim more, and be drowned on shore. – Spanish Proverb

To take ambition from a soldier, is to rob him of his spurs. – Spanish Proverb

To tell a woman what she cannot do is to tell her what she can. – Spanish Proverb

To the bold man fortune gives her hand. – Spanish Proverb

To the good listener, half a word is enough. – Spanish Proverb

To the grateful man give more than he asks. – Spanish Proverb

To whom you tell your secrets, to him you resign your liberty. – Spanish Proverb

To your son give a good name and a trade. – Spanish Proverb

Today is yesterday’s pupil. – Spanish Proverb

Tomorrow is often the busiest day of the week. – Spanish Proverb

Tomorrow is often the busiest time of the year. – Spanish Proverb

Tomorrow is the busiest day of the year. – Spanish Proverb

To-morrow will be another day. – Spanish Proverb

Tomorrow’s remedy will not ward off the evil of today. – Spanish Proverb

To-morrow’s remedy will not ward off the evil of to-day. – Spanish Proverb

Too many cooks spoil the broth. – Spanish Proverb

Too many irons in the fire. – Spanish Proverb

Too much breaks the bag. – Spanish Proverb

Too much bursts the bag. – Spanish Proverb

Treat the small in the way you would want to be treated by the big. – Spanish Proverb

Tripe broth, you make much of yourself. – Spanish Proverb

Trouble will rain on those who are already wet. – Spanish Proverb

Trouts are not caught with dry breeches. – Spanish Proverb

True love suffers no concealment. – Spanish Proverb

Trust in God upon good security. – Spanish Proverb

Trust not your gossip to a priest who has been a friar. – Spanish Proverb

Trust not your money to one whose eyes are bent on the ground. – Spanish Proverb

Truth and oil always come to the surface. – Spanish Proverb

Truth and oil, always come to the surface. – Spanish Proverb

Truth, like oil, always comes to the surface. – Spanish Proverb

Truths and roses have thorns about them. – Spanish Proverb

Try to strike a happy medium. – Spanish Proverb

Two birds of prey do not keep each other company. – Spanish Proverb

Two blacks don’t make a white. – Spanish Proverb

Two boys are half a boy, and three boys are no boy at all. – Spanish Proverb

Two can play at that game. – Spanish Proverb

Two cannot fall out if one does not choose. – Spanish Proverb

Two false men to one traitor. – Spanish Proverb

Two great talkers never go far together. – Spanish Proverb

Two great talkers will not travel far together. – Spanish Proverb

Two in distress makes sorrow less. – Spanish Proverb

Two of a trade can never agree. – Spanish Proverb

Two of a trade never agree. – Spanish Proverb

Two sparrows on one ear of corn never agree. – Spanish Proverb

Under a bad cloak there is a good tippler. – Spanish Proverb

Under a gold sheath a leaden knife. – Spanish Proverb

Under a good cloak may be a bad man. – Spanish Proverb

Under a tattered cloak you will generally find a good drinker. 

Under my cloak I command the king. – Spanish Proverb

Under my cloak I kill the king. – Spanish Proverb

Under the sackcloth there is something hid. – Spanish Proverb

Unshared joy is an unlighted candle. – Spanish Proverb

Vainglory blossoms, and bears no fruit. – Spanish Proverb

Visit your aunt, but not every day of the year. – Spanish Proverb

Walk till the blood appears on the cheek, but not the sweat on the brow. – Spanish Proverb

Walk until the blood appears on the cheek, but not the sweat on the brow. – Spanish Proverb

Walls have ears. – Spanish Proverb

Walls sink and dunghills rise. – Spanish Proverb

Walnuts and pears you plant for your heirs. – Spanish Proverb

War with all the world, and peace with England. – Spanish Proverb

Watch out for a bad woman and never trust a good one. – Spanish Proverb

Watch out for the dog that doesn’t bark and the man who says nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Water for oxen, wine for kings. – Spanish Proverb

Water past will not turn the mill. – Spanish Proverb

We all have a little bit of musician, poet and crazy person in ourselves. – Spanish Proverb

We are all equal in the eyes of the Lord. – Spanish Proverb

We are as the king, only not as rich. – Spanish Proverb

We are both carriers, and shall meet on the road. – Spanish Proverb

We are not roasting, and already we are basting. – Spanish Proverb

We are not yet roasting, and already we make sops in the pan. – Spanish Proverb

We do not know what is good until we have lost it. – Spanish Proverb

We have been fools once in our lives. – Spanish Proverb

We have no son, and yet are giving him a name. – Spanish Proverb

We have not yet saddled, and are already mounted. – Spanish Proverb

We make more enemies by what we say than friends by what we do. – Spanish Proverb

We must live by the living, not by the dead. – Spanish Proverb

Weight and measure save a man toil. – Spanish Proverb

Welcome, misfortune, if you come alone. – Spanish Proverb

Well begun is half done. – Spanish Proverb

We’ll just have to make do. – Spanish Proverb

Well-married is when you have no mother-in-law and no sister-in-law. – Spanish Proverb

We’re all a little crazy in one way or another. – Spanish Proverb

Were you at the wedding, Molly? No, mother, but the bride was very fine. – Spanish Proverb

Wet kisses are the messengers of the heart. – Spanish Proverb

What a fool does in the end, the wise do in the beginning. – Spanish Proverb

What a woman wills God wills. – Spanish Proverb

What belongs to everybody belongs to nobody. – Spanish Proverb

What can’t be cured must be endured. – Spanish Proverb

What children hear their parents say by the fireside, they repeat in the highway. – Spanish Proverb

What Christ does not take the exchequer takes. – Spanish Proverb

What cures Sancho makes Martha sick. – Spanish Proverb

What cures the liver harms the spleen. – Spanish Proverb

What does not happen in a year may happen in a moment. – Spanish Proverb

What force cannot do ingenuity may. – Spanish Proverb

What have you to hide from someone who shows you his arse? – Spanish Proverb

What I see with my eyes I can guess with my fingers. – Spanish Proverb

What is another’s always pines for its master. – Spanish Proverb

What is done, is done for this time. – Spanish Proverb

What is in use, wants no excuse. – Spanish Proverb

What is mine is my own; my brother Juan’s is his and mine. – Spanish Proverb

What is much desired is not believed when it comes. – Spanish Proverb

What is new cannot be true. – Spanish Proverb

What is not yours always chirps for its master. – Spanish Proverb

What is whispered in your ear tell not to your husband. – Spanish Proverb

What much is worth comes from the earth. – Spanish Proverb

What must be, must be. – Spanish Proverb

What my neighbour eats does my stomach no good. – Spanish Proverb

What one does, one becomes. – Spanish Proverb

What the abbot of Bamba cannot eat he gives away for the good of his soul. – Spanish Proverb

What the boss says goes. – Spanish Proverb

What the fool does at last the wise man does at first. – Spanish Proverb

What the she-wolf does pleases the he-wolf. – Spanish Proverb

What three know, everybody knows. – Spanish Proverb

What you dislike for yourself do not like for me. – Spanish Proverb

What you see is what you get. – Spanish Proverb

Whatever way you take there is a league of bad road. – Spanish Proverb

What’s everybody’s business is nobody’s business. – Spanish Proverb

When a fool has made up his mind the market has gone by. – Spanish Proverb

When a fox is in his hole, the smoke fetches him out. – Spanish Proverb

When a friend asks, there is no tomorrow. – Spanish Proverb

When a good offer comes for your daughter, don’t wait till her father returns from market. – Spanish Proverb

When a goose dances, and a fool versifies, there is sport. – Spanish Proverb

When a man is not used to breeches the seams gall him. – Spanish Proverb

When a peasant gets rich, he knows neither relations nor friends. – Spanish Proverb

When an old man cannot drink, prepare his grave. – Spanish Proverb

When drink enters, wisdom departs. – Spanish Proverb

When drums beat, laws are silent. – Spanish Proverb

When every one says you are an ass, bray. – Spanish Proverb

When fire and water are at war, it is the fire that loses. – Spanish Proverb

When flatterers meet the devil goes to dinner. – Spanish Proverb

When fortune knocks upon the door open it widely. – Spanish Proverb

When God gives light he gives it for all. – Spanish Proverb

When God pleases, it rains in fair weather. – Spanish Proverb

When God pleases, it rains with every wind. – Spanish Proverb

When God will not, the saints cannot. – Spanish Proverb 

When good cheer is lacking, our friends will be packing. – Spanish Proverb

When he was born, Solomon passed by his door, and could not go in. – Spanish Proverb

When I was born I wept, and every day brings a reason why. – Spanish Proverb

When ill-luck sleeps, let no one wake her. – Spanish Proverb

When it rains in August, it rains honey and wine. – Spanish Proverb

When it rains in February, it will be temperate all the year. – Spanish Proverb

When it rains, it pours. – Spanish Proverb

When love is not madness, it is not love. – Spanish Proverb

When misfortune sleeps, let no one wake her. – Spanish Proverb

When one door shuts, a hundred open. – Spanish Proverb

When one door shuts, another opens. – Spanish Proverb

When one is hungry everything tastes good. – Spanish Proverb

When one wolf eats another, thee is nothing to eat in the wood. – Spanish Proverb

When our daughter is married sons-in-law are plenty. – Spanish Proverb

When our enemy flies, build him a golden bridge. – Spanish Proverb

When passion entereth at the fore-gate wisdom goes out at the postern. – Spanish Proverb

When poor, liberal; when rich, stingy. – Spanish Proverb

When the bee sucks, it makes honey, when the spider, poison. – Spanish Proverb

When the cat’s away, the mice will play. – Spanish Proverb

When the cat’s away the rats will play. – Spanish Proverb

When the child cuts its teeth, death is on the watch. – Spanish Proverb

When the corsair promises masses and candles, it goes ill with the galley. – Spanish Proverb

When the devil finds the door shut he goes away. – Spanish Proverb

When the devil says his prayers he wants to cheat you. – Spanish Proverb

When the Devil was sick the Devil a monk would be, When the Devil got well, the devil a monk was he. – Spanish Proverb

When the fields yield not, the saints have not. – Spanish Proverb

When the flatterer pipes, the devil dances. – Spanish Proverb

When the iron is hot, then is the time to strike. – Spanish Proverb

When the old dog barks, he gives counsel. – Spanish Proverb

When the ox falls, there are many that will help to kill him. – Spanish Proverb

When the prior plays cards, what will the monks do? – Spanish Proverb

When the rabbit has escaped, comes advice. – Spanish Proverb

When the river makes no noise, it is either dried up or much swollen. – Spanish Proverb

When the Spaniard sings he is either stupid or without money. – Spanish Proverb

When the spleen increases, the body diminishes. – Spanish Proverb

When the steed is stolen, you shut the stable door. – Spanish Proverb

When the summer is winter, and the winter is summer, it is a sorry year. – Spanish Proverb

When there are two friends to one purse, one sings, the other weeps. – Spanish Proverb

When there is a famine, no bread is stale. – Spanish Proverb (Catalonia)

When there is a war between fire and water, fire loses. – Spanish Proverb

When there is real danger, the dogs don’t bark. – Spanish Proverb

When they give you the calf, be ready with the halter. – Spanish Proverb

When they offer you a ring, hold out your finger. – Spanish Proverb

When thieves fall out the thefts come to light. – Spanish Proverb

When thieves fall out, honest men come by their own. – Spanish Proverb

When thou seest thy house in flames, go warm thyself by it. – Spanish Proverb

When three people call you an ass, put on a bridle. – Spanish Proverb

When two are in love, only one needs to eat. – Spanish Proverb

When two friends dip into their purse, one laughs, the other cries. – Spanish Proverb

When war begins the devil makes hell bigger. – Spanish Proverb

When we ask a favour, we say, Madam; when we obtain it, what we please. – Spanish Proverb

When we think to catch we are sometimes caught. – Spanish Proverb

When you are an anvil, bear; when you are a hammer, strike. – Spanish Proverb

When you are at Rome do as Rome does. – Spanish Proverb

When you are on the road speak not ill of your enemy. – Spanish Proverb

When you are talking about marriage, think about your mother. – Spanish Proverb

When you can’t get bread, oat-cakes are not amiss. – Spanish Proverb

When you can’t get meat, chickens and bacon are good. – Spanish Proverb

When you die, your trumpeter will be buried. – Spanish Proverb

When you eat new bread, don’t drink water. – Spanish Proverb

When you go to a strange house knock at the door. – Spanish Proverb

Where force prevails, right perishes. – Spanish Proverb

Where friars abound keep your eyes open. – Spanish Proverb

Where God has his church the Devil will have his chapel. – Spanish Proverb

Where God sends babbies he sends penny loaves. – Spanish Proverb

Where luck is wanting, diligence is useless. – Spanish Proverb

Where MacGregor sits at the head of the table. – Spanish Proverb

Where man is not, nature is barren. – Spanish Proverb

Where one door is shut another opens. – Spanish Proverb

Where one door shuts another opens. – Spanish Proverb

Where shall the ox go and not plough? – Spanish Proverb

Where the goat leaps, leaps that which sucks her. – Spanish Proverb

Where the heart is past hope, the face is past shame. – Spanish Proverb

Where the river is deepest it makes the least noise. – Spanish Proverb

Where the sea goes let the sands go. – Spanish Proverb

Where the wolf gets one lamb he looks for another. – Spanish Proverb

Where there is love there is pain. – Spanish Proverb

Where there is love, there is pain. – Spanish Proverb

Where there is no want of will, there will be no want of opportunity. – Spanish Proverb

Where there’s a will there’s a way. – Spanish Proverb

Where there’s fire there’s smoke. – Spanish Proverb

Where there’s gossiping, there’s lying. – Spanish Proverb

Where there’s muck, there’s money. – Spanish Proverb

Where there’s smoke, there’s fire. – Spanish Proverb

Where there’s whispering, there’s lying. – Spanish Proverb

Where they eat your meat let them pick the bones. – Spanish Proverb

Where you father has been with ink, go not you with a bag. – Spanish Proverb

Where you lose nothing, you always win something. – Spanish Proverb

Where you lost your cloak, seek it. – Spanish Proverb

Where you smart there I will hit you. – Spanish Proverb

Where you think there is bacon, there are not even hooks for it. – Spanish Proverb

Wherever you are, do as you see done. – Spanish Proverb

Wherever you may be, do as you see done. – Spanish Proverb

Wherries must not put out to sea. – Spanish Proverb

Whether it be so or not, husband, put on your hood. – Spanish Proverb

Whether the pitcher strike the stone, or the stone the pitcher, woe be to the pitcher. – Spanish Proverb

Whether you boil snow or pound it you can have but water of it. – Spanish Proverb

Whether you ignore a pig, or worship that pig from afar, to the pig it’s all the same. – Spanish Proverb

Whilst the nurse suckles, we love her; when she is of no further use, she is forgotten. – Spanish Proverb

Whilst the tall maid is stooping, the little one sweeps the house. – Spanish Proverb

Whilst we drink, prank ourselves, with wenches daily, Old age upon’s at unawares doth sally. – Spanish Proverb

White hands are no offence. – Spanish Proverb

Whither goest thou, Misfortune? To where there is more. – Spanish Proverb

Whither goest thou, sorrow? Whither I am used to go. – Spanish Proverb

Whither shall the ox go, where he will not have to plough? – Spanish Proverb

Who arrays himself in other men’s garments is stripped on the highway. – Spanish Proverb

Who gives the bread lays down the authority. – Spanish Proverb

Who gives what he has before he is dead, take a mallet and knock that fool on the head. – Spanish Proverb

Who gossips with you will gossip about you. – Spanish Proverb

Who has a trade may go anywhere. – Spanish Proverb

Who has no bread to spare should not keep a dog. – Spanish Proverb

Who has nothing fears nothing. – Spanish Proverb

Who has time yet waits for time, comes to a time of repentance. – Spanish Proverb

Who is always prying into other men’s affairs, leads a dangerous life. – Spanish Proverb

Who is to bell the cat? – Spanish Proverb

Who is to carry the cat to the water? – Spanish Proverb

Who is well seated, let him not budge. – Spanish Proverb

Who is your enemy? A man of your own trade. – Spanish Proverb

Who knows most says least. – Spanish Proverb

Who knows most speaks least. – Spanish Proverb

Who lends recovers not; or if he recovers, recovers not all; or if not all, not much; of if much, a mortal enemy. – Spanish Proverb

Who preaches in the desert loses his sermon. – Spanish Proverb

Who receives a gift, sells his liberty. – Spanish Proverb

Who stumbles without falling makes a bigger step. – Spanish Proverb

Who talks much, errs much. – Spanish Proverb

Who ventures nothing has no luck. – Spanish Proverb

Who wings, drives away care. – Spanish Proverb

Whoever falls sick of folly, is long in getting cured. – Spanish Proverb

Whoever gossips to you will gossip about you. – Spanish Proverb

Whom God loves, his bitch litters pigs. – Spanish Proverb

Whom God will destroy, he first makes mad. – Spanish Proverb

Whom the gods love die young. – Spanish Proverb

Whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad. – Spanish Proverb

Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth. – Spanish Proverb

Whoredom and thieving are never long concealed. – Spanish Proverb

Win a game of your friend, and drink the money on the spot. – Spanish Proverb

Wind and good luck are seldom lasting. – Spanish Proverb

Wine wears no breeches. – Spanish Proverb

Wine wears no mask. – Spanish Proverb

Wipe the nose of your neighbour’s son, and marry him to your daughter. – Spanish Proverb

Wipe your eye with your elbow. – Spanish Proverb

Wit without discretion is a sword in the hand of a fool. – Spanish Proverb

With a little wrong a man comes by his right. – Spanish Proverb

With a staircase before you, you look for a rope to go down by. – Spanish Proverb

With bread and wine you can walk your road. – Spanish Proverb

With lightning and with love, the clothes sound, the heart burned. – Spanish Proverb

With money you would not know yourself; without money nobody would know you. – Spanish Proverb

Wit’s never bought till it’s paid for. – Spanish Proverb

Woe to the house where the hen crows and the rooster is still. – Spanish Proverb

Woe to the mule that sees not her master. – Spanish Proverb

Women and calendars are good only for a year. – Spanish Proverb

Women and melons are at their best when they are really ripe. – Spanish Proverb

Women and wine rid a man of his common sense. – Spanish Proverb

Women, melons, and cheese are bought by the weight. – Spanish Proverb

Women, wind, and fortune, soon change. – Spanish Proverb

Words must be weighed not counted. – Spanish Proverb

Words will not do for my aunt, for she does not put faith even in deeds. – Spanish Proverb

Work improves the harvest better than the field itself. – Spanish Proverb

Working and painting are better from a distance. – Spanish Proverb

Wounds from the knife are healed, but not those from the tongue. – Spanish Proverb

Wounds heal, but not ill words. – Spanish Proverb

Wounds pain most when grown cool. – Spanish Proverb

Wrinkles are the gravestones of love. – Spanish Proverb

Yesterday a cowherd, to-day a cavalier. – Spanish Proverb

You are what you own. – Spanish Proverb

You can judge a man by the company he keeps. – Spanish Proverb

You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t catch trout with dry breeches. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t have more bed-bugs than a blanket-full. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t have more bugs than a blanketfull. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t have your cake and eat it too. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t make an omelet without breaking eggs. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t make bricks without straw. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t make pancakes without breaking eggs. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t serve God and Mammon. – Spanish Proverb

You can’t win them all. – Spanish Proverb

You have broken my head and now you bring plaister. – Spanish Proverb

You have debts, and make debts still; if you’ve not lied, lie you will. – Spanish Proverb

You have to make the most of the chances that come your way. You have to strike while the iron is hot. – Spanish Proverb

You have to suffer in the name of fashion. – Spanish Proverb

You must face the consequences of your actions. – Spanish Proverb

You must tolerate that which you cannot change. – Spanish Proverb

You notice what I drink, and not the thirst I feel. – Spanish Proverb

You surrender your freedom where you deposit your secret. – Spanish Proverb

You used to be a baker, though now you wear gloves. – Spanish Proverb

You want better bread than wheaten. – Spanish Proverb

You will not be loved if you care for none but yourself. – Spanish Proverb

Your cracked jug seems better to me than my sound one. – Spanish Proverb

You’re casting pearls before swine. – Spanish Proverb

You’ve made bed, and now you’ll have to lie in it. – Spanish Proverb

Spanish Proverbs

Spanish Proverbs and Sayings with Their English Equivalents

SPANISH ENGLISH
A beber y a tragar, que el mundo se va a acabar. Eat, drink and be merry (for tomorrow we die).
A buen(a) hambre, no hay mal pan / pan duro, (ni falta salsa a ninguno) /no hace falta condimento.

A mucha hambre, no hay pan duro.

Al hambre de siete dias, no hay pan duro.

Beggars can’t be choosers.

For a good appetite there is no hard bread.

A cada puerco le llega su sabado / San Martin. Everyone gets his comeuppance in the end / just deserts sooner or later.
A diario una manzana es cosa sana. An apple a day keeps the doctor away.
A donde el corazon se inclina, el pie camina. Home is where the heart is.
A donde te quieren mucho no vengas a menudo. A constant guest is never welcome.
A falta de pan, buenas son (las) tortas / las tortas son buenas. We’ll just have to make do.
A la ocasion la pintan calva. You have to make the most of the chances that come your way.

You have to strike while the iron is hot.

A los tontos no les dura el dinero. A fool and his money are soon parted.
A mas honor, mas dolor. The more danger, the more honor.
A palabras necias, oidos sordos. Take no notice of the stupid things people say.
A pan de quince dias, hambre de tres semanas. Beggars can’t be choosers.

For a good appetite there is no hard bread.

Hunger is good kitchen.

Hunger is the best sauce.

Hunger never saw bad bread / food.

When one is hungry everything tastes good.

A quien cuida la peseta nunca le falta un duro. Look after the pennies, and the pounds will look after themselves.
A quien Dios ama, le llama. Whom the gods love die young.
A quien no le sobra pan, no crie can. Never spend your money before you have it.
A quien Dios quiere para si, poco tiempo lo tiene aqui. Whom the gods love die young.
A rey muerto, rey puesto. As soon as one goes out the window, another comes in the door.
A todos les llega su momento de gloria. Every dog has its day.
Abundancia y soberbia andan en pareja. Plenty breed pride.
Al buen pagador no le duelen prendas. A good payer will not object to leaving a deposit.
Al desdichado hace consuelo tener compania en su suerte y duelo. Two in distress makes sorrow less.
Al freir sera el reir (y al pagar sera el llorar). At the game’s end we shall see who gains.
Al que no quiera(e) caldo / taza, (se le dan) taza y media / dos / tres / siete tazas. It never rains, but it pours.
Al vivo la hogaza y al muerto, la mortaja. We must live by the living, not by the dead.
Algo es algo; menos es nada. Half a loaf is better than no bread.
Amar es tiempo perdido, si no se es correspondido.

Amar y no ser amado es tiempo mal empleado.

Amar, horas perdidas, sino son correspondidas.

Amor no correspondido, tiempo perdido.

Of all pains, the greatest pain, is to love, but love in vain.
Amigo y vino, el mas antiguo. Old friends and old wine and old gold are best.
Amor con amor se paga; y lo demas con dinero. Love does much, money does everything.
Amor no respeta ley, ni obedece a rey. Love laughs at locksmiths.
Aquellos polvos traen estos lodos. The chickens have come home to roost.

You’re suffering the consequences now.

Ausencia al mas amigo presto le pone en olvido.

Ausencias causan olvido.

Long absent, soon forgotten.
Borra con el codo lo que escribe con la mano. Her left hand doesn’t know what her right hand is doing.
Borron y cuenta nueva. Let bygones be bygones.
Cada uno en su casa, y Dios en la de todos. Each to his own and God watching over everyone.
Cada uno es / era de su padre y de su madre. They are / were all different.
Cada uno habla de la feria segun le va en ella. Everyone sees things from his / her own point of view.
Cada uno sabe (a) donde le aprieta el zapato. Each person knows where problems lie.
Chancho limpio nunca engorda. A few germs never hurt anyone.
Comer hasta enfermar y ayunar hasta sanar. He that eats till he is sick must fast till he is well.
Comida hecha, compania deshecha. When good cheer is lacking, our friends will be packing.
Comiendo entra la gana. Appetite comes with eating.
Como (que) dos y dos son cuatro. As sure as eggs is eggs / (God made) little green apples / night follows day / the day is long.
Como quien oye llover. It’s like water off a duck’s back.
Con el tiempo y la paciencia se adquiere la ciencia. Patience, time, and money accommodate all things.
Con esperanza no se come. Honor buys no meat in the market.

Hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper.

Con la honra no se pone la olla. Honor buys no meat in the market.
Con paciencia y con mana, un elefante se comio una arana.

Con paciencia y saliva, un elefante se tiro a una hormiga.

Little strokes fell great oaks.
Con su pan se lo coma. It’s his / her own lookout / tough luck.
Con un cambio de actividad se renuevan las energias. A change is as good as a rest.
Consejo es de sabios perdonar injurias y olvidar agravios. To err is human, to forgive divine.
Consejo no pedido, consejo mal oido. Never give advice unasked.
Cortesia de boca gana mucho a poca costa / mucho consigue y nada cuesta.. A soft answer turneth away wrath.
Cria fama y echate a dormir. Give a dog a bad name (and hang it).
Cuando de vista te pierdo, si te vi ya no me acuerdo. Long absent, soon forgotten.
Cuando hay hambre, no hay mal pan / pan duro. Any port in a storm.

Beggars can’t be choosers.

For a good appetite there is no hard bread.

Hunger is good kitchen.

Hunger is the best sauce.

Hunger never saw bad bread / food.

When one is hungry everything tastes good.

Cuando la fuerza manda, la ley calla. When drums beat, laws are silent.
Cuando menos piensa el galgo, salta la liebre. Things often happen when you least expect them to.

Where we least think, there goes the hare away.

Cuanto menos se diga, mejor / menos hay que rectificar. Least said, soonest mended.
Cumpla yo y tiren ellos. Do what is right, come what may.
Da lo mismo (una cosa que otra). (It’s) Six of one (and half a dozen of the other).
Dame pan y dime tonto. I don’t care what people say as long as I get what want.
De casi no se muere nadie. A miss is as good as a mile.
De cuerdo y loco todos tenemos un poco. We’re all a little crazy in one way or another.
De lo perdido saca lo que puedas. Make the best of a bad bargain / bad job / bad situation / it.
De musico, poeta, y loco, todos tenemos un poco. We have been fools once in our lives.
De noche, (todos) los gatos son pardos. No one will notice (in the dark).
De (sabio) poeta y loco, todos tenemos un poco. We have been fools once in our lives.
De todo hay en la vina del Senor. There’s nothing so queer as folk.
De un castigo, cien escarmentados. He that chastens one chastens twenty.
Desgracia compartida, menos sentida. Two in distress makes sorrow less.
Dime con quien andas, y te dire quien eres. You can judge a man by the company he keeps.
Dime no con quien naces, sino con quien paces. Birth is much, but breeding is more.
Dios que da la llaga, da la medicina. God sends cold after clothes.
Donde hay hambre, no hay pan duro. Any port in a storm.

Beggars can’t be choosers.

For a good appetite there is no hard bread.

Donde hay humo, hay calor. There’s no smoke without fire.

Where there’s smoke, there’s fire.

Donde hay patron, no manda marinero. What the boss says goes.
Donde menos piensa el galgo, salta la liebre. Things often happen when you least expect them to.

Where we least think, there goes the hare away.

Donde no hay harina, todo es mohina. Poverty breeds discontent.
El amor todo lo puede. Love will find a way.
El casado casa quiere.

El casado quiere casa, y costal para la plaza.

Married people need a home of their own.
El dinero llama (al) dinero. Money goes where money is.
El errar es humano, (el) perdonar, divino. To err is human, to forgive divine.
El exito llama al exito. Nothing succeeds like success.
El hambre no encuentra peros al condimento. Any port in a storm.

Beggars can’t be choosers.

For a good appetite there is no hard bread.

Hunger is good kitchen.

Hunger is the best sauce.

Hunger never saw bad bread / food.

When one is hungry everything tastes good.

El ladron que roba a otro ladron tiene cien años de perdon. It’s no crime to steal from a thief.
El mal entra a brazadas y sale a pulgaradas. Mischief comes by the pound and goes away by the ounce.
El mayor aborrecimiento, en el amor tiene su cimiento. The greatest hate springs from the greatest love.
El mejor halago es que lo imiten a uno. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.
El movimiento se demuestra andando. Actions speak louder than words / voice.
El muerto al hoyo y le vivo al bollo. Dead men have no friends.
El mundo es de los audaces. Faint heart never won fair lady.
El mundo es un panuelo. (It’s a) Small world!
El necio es atrevido y el sabio comedido. Fools rush / walk in where angels fear to tread.
El pecado se paga con la muerte. The wages of sin is death.
El que algo quiere, algo le cuesta. He that would have the fruit must climb the tree.
El que hace la paga. You’ve made bed, (and) now you’ll have to / you must lie in it.
El que hurta / roba al / a un / otro ladron tiene cien años de perdon. It’s no crime to steal from a thief.
El que la sigue la consigue. If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.
El que madruga coge la oruga. The early bird catches the worm.
El que nace para medio nunca llega a real. If you don’t have what it takes you won’t get on in the world.
El que nace para mulo del cielo le cae el arnes / policia del cielo le cae el bolillo. He that is born to be hanged shall never be drowned.

You can’t escape your destiny.

El que no mira, no suspira. Long absent, soon forgotten.
El que no trabaje, que no coma. No bees, no honey; no work, no money.

No mill, no meal.

El que se fue a / para la villa perdio su silla y el que se fue a Torreon su sillon.

El que se fue a Sevilla, perdio su silla / para Quito perdio su banquito.

If you go away, you can’t expect people to keep your place for you.

If you leave your place, you lose it.

El remedio puede ser peor que la enfermedad. Sometimes the remedy is worse than the disease.
El saber no ocupa lugar. One can never know too much.
El sol brilla para todos. We are all equal in the eyes of the Lord.
El tiempo lo cura todo. Time heals all wounds.

Time is a great healer.

El tiempo pasa inexorablemente. Time and tide wait for no man.
El tiempo restaura las heridas. Time heals all wounds.

Time is a great healer.

El trabajo compartido es mas llevadero. Many hands make light work.
El verdadero hogar es donde uno tiene a los suyos. Home is where the heart is.
El viejo que se cura, cien anos dura. A creaking door hangs longest.
En casa de carpintero, puerta de cuero.

En casa de herrero, cuchillo de palo.

The shoemaker’s son always goes barefoot.
En el amor y la guerra, todo hueco es trinchera. Any port in a storm.
En el termino medio esta la virtud. More than enough is too much.
En esta vida caduca el que no trabaja no manduca. No bees, no honey; no work, no money.

No mill, no meal.

En las malas se conocen a los amigos. A friend in need is a friend indeed.
En los nidos de antano, no hay pajaros hogano. Things have changed.

Time doesn’t stand still.

En tiempos de guerra, cualquier hoyo es trinchera. Any port in a storm.
Ensuciandose las manos, se puede hacer uno rico. Where there’s muck, there’s brass / money.
Entre bueyes no hay cornadas. There’s honor among thieves.
Entre ruin ganado poco hay que escoger. Small choice in rotten apples.
Es como hablar a la pared. It’s like talking to a brick wall.
Es el mismo perro con diferente collar. It’s the same people under a different name.

Nothing has really changed.

Es igual uno que otro. (It’s) Six of one (and half a dozen of the other).
Es peor el remedio que la enfermedad. It just makes things worse.
Espaldas vueltas, memorias muertas. Long absent, soon forgotten.
Excusa no pedida, la culpa manifiesta. He who excuses himself accuses himself.
Fue peor el remedio que la enfermedad. It just makes things worse.
Gusta lo ajeno, mas por ajeno que por bueno. The grass looks greener on the other side of the fence.
Hacer de tripas corazon. What can’t be cured must be endured.
Hay de todo en la vina del Senor. Live and let live.

There’s nothing so queer as folk.

Hay mas felicidad en dar que en recibir. It’s more blessed to give than to receive.
Hay mucho mas donde elegir. There are plenty more fish in the sea.
Hay que dejar tiempo para el esparcimiento. All work and no play make Jack a dull boy.
Hay ropa tendida. Walls have ears.
Haz el bien sin mirar a quien / y no acates / mires a quien. Do what is right, come what may.
Hierba mala nunca muere. The devil looks after himself / his own.
Hombre de muchos oficios, pobre seguro. A rolling stone gathers no moss.
Hombre precavido, vale por dos. One good forewit is worth two afterwits.
La abundancia mata la gana. Abundance of things engenders disdainfulness.
La ausencia es al amor lo que al fuego el aire: que apaga el pequeño y aviva el grande.  Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
La comida, a reposar; y la cena a pasear. After dinner rest a while, after supper walk a mile.
La compania en la miseria hace a esta mas llevadera. Two in distress makes sorrow less.
La distancia es el olvido. Long absent, soon forgotten.
La ira es locura, el tiempo que dura. Anger is a short madeness.
La mejor felicidad es la conformidad. Bear and forbear.
La mujer honrada, la pierna quebrada y en casa. A woman’s place is in the home.
La necesidad hace maestros. Necessity is the mother of invention.
La perdiz por el pico se pierde. If you talk too much you’re likely to give yourself away.
La plata llama la plata. Money goes where money is.
La posesion es lo que cuenta. Possession is nine parts / points / tenths of the law.
La primavera la sangre altera. Spring is in the air.

The sap rises in the spring.

La prudencia es la madre de la ciencia. Discretion is the better part of courage / valor.
La risa es el mejor remedio. Laughter is the best medicine.
La salud es la mayor riqueza. Health is better than wealth.
La suerte esta echada. The die is cast.
La verdad a medias es mentira verdadera. Half the truth is often a whole lie.
Ladron que roba a otro ladron tiene cien anos de perdon. It’s no crime to steal from a thief.
Larga ausencia causa olvido. Long absent, soon forgotten.
Las cosas no se arreglan con palabras elocuentes. Fine words butter no parsnips.
Las cosas suelen empeorar antes de mejorar. The darkest hour comes / is past / is that before the dawn.
Las cuentas claras hacen los buenos amigos. Let’s get things clear.
Las mentiras tienen las patas cortas. (The) Truth will out.
Las palabras se las lleva el viento. Actions speak louder than words / voice.
Las penas con pan son menos. All griefs with bread are less.
Lejos de ojos, lejos del corazon. Long absent, soon forgotten.
Ley pareja no es dura / rigurosa. A rule isn’t unfair if it applies to everyone.
Lo mejor es ser franco. Honesty is the best policy.
Lo mismo Chana que Sebas-tiana. (It’s) Six of one (and half a dozen of the other).
Lo pasado, pasado esta. Let bygones be bygones.
Lo poco agrada y lo mucho enfada. A constant guest is never welcome.
Lo que es moda no incomoda. You have to suffer in the name of fashion / to be fashionable.
Lo que no se ve, pronto se olvida. Long absent, soon forgotten.
Lo que pienses en comprar, no lo has de alabar. He that blames would buy.
Lo que se mama de nino dura toda la vida. The child is the father of the man.
Lo que se pierde en una casa se gana en otra. It’s a question of swings and roundabouts.

What you lose in / on the swings, you gain in the roundabouts.

Los genios pensamos igual. Great minds think alike.
Los mirones son de piedra. If you want to watch, you’d better keep quiet.
Los trabajos vienen al trote y se van al paso. Mischief comes by the pound and goes away by the ounce.
Mal de muchos, consuelo de todos / tontos. Two in distress makes sorrow less.
Mal que no tiene cura, quererlo curar es locura. What can’t be cured must be endured.
Mala hierba nunca muere. The devil looks after himself / his own.
Mas apaga la buena palabra que caldera de agua. A soft answer turneth away wrath.
Mas discurre un hambriento que cien letrados. Hunger drives the wol out of the woods.
Mas puede la pluma que la espada. The pen is mightier than the sword.
Mas sabe el diablo por viejo que por diablo. There’s no substitute for experience.
Mas se perdio en Cuba. It’s not the end of the world.

Worse things happened at sea.

Mas vale antes que despues. One good forewit is worth two afterwits.
Mas vale dar que recibir. It’s more blessed to give than to receive.
Mas vale estar solo que (estar) mal acompanado. It’s better to be on your own than with people you don’t like.
Mas vale la salud que el dinero / la riqueza. Health is better than wealth.
Mas vale mana que fuerza. Brain is better than brawn.
Más vale tarde que nunca. Better late than never
Mayor dicha es dar que recibir. It’s more blessed to give than to receive.
Mejor es no menearlo.

Mejor no revolver el asunto.

Let sleeping dogs lie.
Merced recibida, libertad vendida. Who receives a gift, sells his liberty.
Mucho ruido y pocas nueces. All mouth and no trousers.

All talk and no action.

Muerto el perro, se acabo la rabia. The best way to solve a problem is to attack the cause / root of it.
Murmurador a la oreja, antes place que molesta. Where there’s whispering, there’s lying.
Nada mejor que un ladron para atrapar a otro ladron. Set a thief to catch a thief.
Nada que valga la pena se logra sin crear conflictos. You can’t make an omelet without breaking eggs.
Nadie esta contento con su suerte. The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.
Ni tanto que queme al santo, ni tanto que no lo alumbre. Try to strike a happy medium.
No dan a quien no acude. He that would have the fruit must climb the tree.
No dejes camino por vereda / camino viejo por camino nuevo. A little thing in hand is worth more than a great thing in prospect.

Better keep now than seek anon.

We would be better off to have than to have coming.

No hay dos sin tres. Misfortunes always come in threes.

These things always come in threes.

No hay mal (ni bien) que cien anos dure / dure cien anos, (ni cristiano / cuerpo / enfermo que lo aguante / resista). Nothing goes on for ever.
No hay mas cera que la que arde. What you see is what you get.
No hay mas de temer que una mujer despechada. Hell has / hath no fury like a woman scorned.
No hay mejor maestra que la necesidad. Necessity is the mother of invention.
No hay miel sin hiel. No bees, no honey; no work, no money.

No mill, no meal.

There’s always a catch.

No hay peor cuna que la de la misma madera / del mismo palo. Servants make the worst masters.
No hay tempestad que mucho dure. Lightning never strikes twice in the same place.
No se hizo la miel para la boca del asno. You’re casting pearls before swine.
No se oia ni (el vuelo de) una mosca. There wasn’t a sound to be heard.

You could have heard a pin drop.

No se puede servir a dos senores. You can’t serve God and Mammon.
No se puede tener todo. You can’t have your cake and eat it too.
No se puede trabajar sin materia prima. You can’t make bricks without straw.
No se sabe si algo es bueno hasta que se lo pone a prueba. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
No solo de pan vive el hombre. Man cannot live by bread alone.
No tiene raices en ningun sitio. Home is where he hangs his hat.
Nunca dejes camino por vereda / camino viejo por camino nuevo.

A little thing in hand is worth more than a great thing in prospect.

Better keep now than seek anon.

We would be better off to have than to have coming.

Nunca es tarde si la dicha es buena. Better late / later than never.

Never too late to do well.

Nunca llueve a gusto de todos. One man’s meat is another man’s poison / another’s poison.

You can’t please everybody.

Obra de comun, obra de ningun. Too many cooks spoil the broth.
Ojos que no ven, corazon que no llora / siente. Long absent, soon forgotten.
Paga lo que debes, sanaras del mal que tienes. Out of debt, out of danger.
Palabras no sacan sangre. No offense taken when none is meant.
Palos porque bogas, palos porque no bogas. You can’t win them all.
Para amigos, todos; para enemigos, uno solo. One enemy is too many; and a hundred friends too few.
Peor es nada. Half a loaf is better than no bread.
Perdiendo aprendi: mas vale lo que aprendi que lo que perdi. Learning is better than house and land.
Persevera y triunfaras. If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

Never say die. .

Pesadumbres no pagan deudas. A pound of care will not pay a pound of debt.
Piensa el ladron que todos son de condicion. Evildoers always think the worst of others.
Piensa mal y acertaras, (aunque alguna vez te equivocaras). If you think the worst, you won’t be far wrong.
Por el hilo se saca el ovillo. It’s just a question of putting two and two together.
Por un perro que mate, mata-perros me llamaron. Give a dog a bad name (and hang it).
Primero es la salud que el dinero. Health is better than wealth.
Procura lo mejor, espera lo peor y toma lo que viniere. Hope for the best and prepare for the worst.
Puedes darle un consejo a alguien, pero no puedes obligarlo a que lo siga. You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink.
Que cada palo aguante su vela. Each of us must face our own responsibilities.
¡Que pequeno es el mundo! . (It’s a) Small world!.
Quien a los suyos se parece en nada los desmerece / honra merece. Like breeds like.
Quien a uno castiga a ciento hostiga. He that chastens one chastens twenty.
Quien canta sus males espanta. Problems don’t seem so bad if you keep cheerful.
Quien comenta, inventa. Where there’s gossiping, there’s lying.
Quien compra ha de tener cien ojos; a quien vende le basta uno solo. The buyer needs a hundred eyes, the seller but one.
Quien con ninos se acuesta, cagado amanece / se levanta. If you lie down with dogs, you’ll get up with fleas.
Quien con perros se echa, con pulgas se levanta. If you lie down with dogs, you’ll get up with fleas.
Quien en tiempo huye, en tiempo acude. He that fights and runs away, lives to fight another day.
Quien espera, desespera. Hope deferred makes the heart sick.
Quien hace la ley hace la trampa. Every law has a / its loophole.
Quien hurta / roba al / a un ladron tiene cien anos de perdon. It’s no crime to steal from a thief.
Quien lengua ha, a Roma va. Better to ask the way than to go astray.
Quien mal anda, mal acaba. If you live like that, you’re bound to come to a bad end.
Quien paga elige. He who pays the piper calls the tune.
Quien poco tiene pronto lo gasta. A moneyless man goes fast through the market.
Quien por su gusto padece, (que) vaya al infierno a quejarse. You must face the consequences of your actions.
Quien quiera saber, que compre un viejo. If you wish good advice, consult an old man.
Quien quita lo que da al infierno va. Give a thing and take a thing, to wear the devil’s gold ring.
Quien roba una vez roba diez. Once a thief, always / ever a thief.
Quien teme la muerte no goza la vida. Cowards die many times.
Rinen a menudo los amantes, por el gusto de hacer las paces. Lovers quarrels are soon mended.
Santa Rita, Santa Rita, lo que se da ya no se quita. Give a thing and take a thing, to wear the devil’s gold ring.
Se pilla al mentiroso antes que al cojo. (The) Truth will out.
Si con desear bastara … If wishes were horses (, then beggars would ride).
Si te he visto / vi / vide, (ya) no me acuerdo. Long absent, soon forgotten.
Si vale la pena hacerlo, vale la pena hacerlo bien. If a job is worth doing, it’s worth doing well.
Si, quitate de en medio. If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.
Siempre llueve sobre mojado. When it rains, it pours.
Sobre gustos y colores no discuten los doctores / no han escrito los autores.

Sobre gustos, no hay nada escrito .

Different strokes for different folks.

Each to his own.

There’s no accounting / disputing for taste.

Tan cierto como dos y dos son cuatro / que yo me llamo X. As sure as eggs is eggs / (God made) little green apples / night follows day / the day is long.
Tanto monta, monta tanto, (Isabel como Fernando). It makes no difference.

It’s as broad as it is long .

Tanto tienes, tanto vales; nada tienes, nada vales. You are what you own.
Tarea que agrada presto se acaba. All things are easy that are done willingly.
Tenga yo salud, y dineros quien los quisiere. Health is better than wealth.
Tetas de mujer tienen mucho poder. Beauty draws more than oxen.
Todos los dias se aprende algo. A man may learn wit every day.
Tomar las cosas a pechos, da fin a los hechos. Anger and hate hinder good counsel.
Vida sin amigos, muerte sin testigos. Friendless in life, friendless in death.
Visita cada dia, a la semana hastia.

Visita rara, convidado amable.

A constant guest is never welcome.
Ya que estamos en el baile, bailemos. In for a penny, in for a pound.

Compiled by / Compilado por Berta Alicia Chen

Spanish Proverbs

Spanish Proverbs, Translation and Meaning

  • A caballo regalado no se le mira el diente/colmillo/dentado/pelo or A caballo regalado no le mires los dientes.
    • English equivalent: Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth.
    • “Do not search for faults in a gift, as in don’t try to guess the horse’s age by looking at its teeth since it is free.”
  • A cabo de cien años los reyes son villanos, A cabo de ciento-diez los villanos son reyes.
    • English equivalent: Every dog has his day.
  • A cada necio agrada su porrada.
    • English equivalentː Every fool is pleased with his own folly.
  • A cada pajarillo agrada su nidillo.
    • English equivalent: The bird loves her own nest.
    • “Deprive economics of the concept of welfare and what do you have? Nothing.” Colin Clark, Conditions of Economic Progress (1940)
  • A canas honradas no hay puertas cerradas.
    • English equivalent: Grey hairs are honorable.
  • A grandes males, grandes remedios.
    • English equivalent: Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.
    • Meaning: “Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation.”
  • A la ocasión la pintan calva.
    • English equivalent: Opportunity knocks only once.
    • Never say ‘no’ to adventures. Always say ‘yes’, otherwise you’ll lead a very dull life.” Ian Fleming, Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang (1964)
  • A la tercera va la vencida.
    • English equivalent: Third time’s the charm.
  • A lo hecho, pecho.
    • English equivalent: What’s done is done. Trim your sails and face the music. Don’t cry over spilled milk.
  • A mal nudo, mal cuño.
    • English equivalent: You must meet roughness with roughness.
  • A quien dan, no escoge.
    • English equivalent: Beggars can’t be choosers.
    • “We must accept with gratitude and without complaint what we are given when we do not have the means or opportunity to provide ourselves with something better.”
  • A quien madruga, Dios le ayuda.
    • Alt: Al que madruga, Dios le ayuda.
    • Alt Variation: Al que madruga, Dios le ayuda; el que se apendeja Dios lo deja. (A play with words that rhyme)
    • Translations:
      • God helps those who get up early. / The early bird gets the worm.
      • Alt.Var:God helps those who get up early, and leaves those who are too late.
    • Interpretations:
      • Initiative will be rewarded.
    • Equivalent English proverbs:
      • Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
    • Meaning: “A lifestyle that involves neither staying up late nor sleeping late is good for body and mind and leads to financial success.”
  • A quien no pide consejo, darlo es de necios.
    • English equivalent: Give neither salt nor counsel till you are asked for it.
  • A quien se hace de miel las moscas le comen.
    • English equivalent: He that makes himself an ass must not take it ill if men ride him.
  • A seguro, le llevan preso.
    • For safety you are taken prisoner.
  • A donde el seto es bajo todos pasan.
    • English equivalent: Men leap over where the hedge is lower.
  • Al amigo más amigo, no le fíes tu secreto, y así nunca te verás, arrepentido o sujeto.
    • If you tell your secret to your friend, you will make him your master.
  • Al árbol por el fruto es conocido.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • “Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.”
  • Al cuco no cuques y al ladrón no hurtes.
    • Literal translation: Don’t cuck the cuckoo and don’t steal the thief. 
  • Al fin es debido el honor.
    • English equivalent: All is well that ends well.
    • “Problems and misfortunes along the way can be forgotten as long as the end is satisfactory.”
  • Al freir de los huevos lo verá.
    • English equivalent: The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
  • Al hombre osado la fortuna le da la mano.
    • English equivalent: Fortune favours the bold.
    • Meaning: “Those who act boldly or courageously are most likely to succeed.”
  • Al médico, confesor, y letrado, no le hayas engañado.
    • English equivalent: Conceal not the truth from thy physician and lawyer.
  • Al mentiroso le conviene ser memorioso.
    • English equivalent: A liar should have a good memory.
    • Meaning: “Liars must remember the untruths they have told, to avoid contradicting themselves at some later date.”
  • Al ratón de un sólo agujero presto le pilla el gato.
    • English equivalent: It is a poor mouse that has only one hole.
    • “Why don’t we just call plans what they really are: guesses.” Jason Fried and David Heinemeier, Rework (2009)
  • Al que mucho se le confía, mucho se le exige.
    • English equivalent: Everybody to whom much is given, much is expected.
    • Meaning: “More is expected of those who have received more – that is, those who had good fortune, are naturally gifted, or have been shown special favour.”
  • Amores, dolores y dineros, No pueden estar secretos.
    • English equivalent: Love, smoke and cough are hard to hide.
  • Antes de criticar pon la mano en tu mecho.
    • English equivalent: Everyone should sweep before his own door.
  • Antes de firmar, mirar.
    • Literal translation: Look before you sign.
  • Antes que te cases, mira lo que haces.
    • Literal translation: Before you get married, watch what you do.
  • Árbol que nace torcido, jamás su tronco endereza
    • A tree that is born twisted never grows straight.
  • Alt: “Árbol que nace torcido, aunque le pongan cien piedras, nunca se endereza.”
    • Alt: A tree that is born twisted, though a hundred stones are placed (around it), never can be straightened.
  • A lo bueno, dejarlo estar.
    • English equivalent: If it isn’t broken, don’t fix it.
  • A papaya puesta, papaya partida. (Colombian saying)
    • Alt: No hay que dar papaya…y a papaya puesta, papaya partida
    • Papaya that is served, papaya that is eaten
    • English equivalent: If you turn yourself into a doormat, others will walk over you.
    • Interpretation: If you leave yourself open to abuse, people will abuse you.
  • A falta de pan, buenas son tortas.
    • Alt: A falta de pan, galletas
    • Alt: A falta de pan, tortillas (Mexico, Guatemala)
    • Alt: A falta de pan, casabe (República Dominicana)
    • Translations:
      • If there’s no bread, cakes will do.
      • In place of bread, cakes are good.
      • Alt. Trans.: If there’s no bread, have crackers
    • Interpretations:
      • Settle for the next best thing.
      • Beggars can’t be choosers.
      • In times of need, kindness is especially sweet.
    • Equivalent English proverb: Any port in a storm.
  • A donde fueres, haz lo que vieres
    • Alt: Allá donde fueres, haz lo que vieres
    • English proverb: When among wolves we must howl.
  • Antes con locos, que cuerdo a solas.
    • English equivalent: Better foolish by all than wise by yourself.
  • Agua blanda en piedra dura, tanto cavadura continua gotera cava la piedra.
    • English equivalent: Constant dropping wears the stone.
    • “A steady effort can achieve, little by little, a great effect, as many drops do by gradually dissolving and eroding the stone.”
  • Apretados pero contentos.
    • English equivalent: The more the merrier.
  • Aprovecha el día presente.
    • Literal translation: Take advantage of the present day.
  • Aunque la mona se vista de seda, mona se queda.
    • English equivalent: A golden bit does not make the horse any better.
    • “To those who are given to virtue, the boast of titles is wholly alien and distasteful.” Petrarch, “On the Various Academic Titles,” De remediis utriusque fortunae, C. Rawski, trans. (1967), p. 73
  • Al que Dios quiere castigar le quita la razón.
    • English equivalent: Whom God will destroy, he first make mad.
  • Al buen callar llaman Sancho.
    • Literal translation: They call the person that shuts up, Sancho.
    • Meaning/use: Recommends prudence and moderation in talk.
    • Comments: According to some authors, for instance José Mª Sbarbi, this proverb has its origin in a historical episode involving Sancho II of Castile. When his father Ferdinand I of Leon and Castile at his death in 1065 divided up his kingdom among his three sons, including himself, Sancho II remained silent. Soon after his father’s death, however, he turned on his brothers and succeeded in dispossessing them, reuniting thus his father’s possessions under his control in 1072. The author Correas, however, sustains that Sancho is used as a variation of the adjective santo (saintly) and should therefore be written in lower-case.
  • Alcalda del mes de enero.
    • New is of the month of January
    • English equivalent: New brooms sweep clean.
    • “We often apply it to exchanges among servants, clerks, or any persons employed, whose service, at first, in any new place, is very good, both efficient and faithful; but very soon, when all the new circumstances have lost their novelty, and all their curiosity has ceased, they naturally fall into their former and habitual slackness.”
  • A todo cerdo le llega su San Martín.
    • Literal translation: Every pig gets his San Martin.
  • Aquél es rico, que está bien con Dios.
    • English equivalent: He who serves God has a good master.
    • “The greatest weakness of all weaknesses is to fear too much to appear weak.” Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet, Politique Tirée de l’Écriture Sainte (Politics Drawn from the Very Words of Holy Scripture) (1679 – published 1709).
  • Aquél va más sano, que anda por el llano.
    • Literal translation: He goes healthier, who walks the plain.
  • Ara bien y hondo, cogerás pan en abando.
    • English equivalent: Plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you will have corn to sell and keep.
  • Bien predica quien bien vive.
    • English equivalent: Lead by example.
  • Callen barbas y hablen cartas.
    • Literal translation: Shut up beards and speak letters.
  • Cada carnero de su pie cuelga.
    • English equivalent: Every bird must hatch its own eggs.
    • Meaning: We must depend on ourselves, financially and in other regards.
  • Cada cosa en su tiempo.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes, God disposes.
    • “Plans are insulted destinies. I don’t have plans, I only have goals.” Ash Chandler, Freudian SlipMumbai Mirror Buzz, April 2006.
  • Cada oveja, con su pareja.
    • English equivalent: Like will to like.
    • “Every man loves well what is like to himself.”
  • Cada buhonero alaba sus agujas.
    • Literal translation: A peddler praises his needles (wares).
    • Meanings/uses: Each seller tries to convince potential buyers that his merchandise is the best.
    • Comments: In a broader sense, people tend to praise what is theirs, often overstating qualities. Used ironically to criticize a person who boasts about his merits.
  • Cada gallo canta en su muladar.
    • Literal translation: Each rooster sings on its dung-heap.
    • Meanings/uses: Each person rules in his own house or territory.
    • Comments: A person manifests his true nature when surrounded by family or close friends, when in his own ambience and in his place of origin.
  • Cada martes tiene su domingo.
    • Literal translation: Each Tuesday has its Sunday.
    • Meaning/Use: Exhorts to optimism, reminding that bad comes in alternation with good.
    • Comments: In this Spanish proverb “good” is represented by Sunday, a festive day in Christian culture, whereas Tuesday, a week-day of less joyous character, stands for “bad”.
  • Cada uno habla de la feria como le va en ella.
    • Literal translation: One talks about the fair according to how one fares.
    • Meaning/use: Our way of talking about things reflects our relevant experience, good or bad.
  • Costumbre adquirida en la mocedad, se deja muy mal en la vejez.
    • English equivalent: Old habits die hard.
  • Como canta el abad, así responde el sacristán.
    • Literal translation: As the abbot sings, the sacristan responds.
  • Comprar gato en saco.
    • English equivalent: Let the buyer have a thousand eyes for the seller wants only one. Theodore Sturgeon Venture (1957)
  • Con el agua de la bañadera echar también al niño.
    • English equivalent: Don’t throw out the child with the bath water.
    • “Do not take the drastic step of abolishing or discarding something in its entirety when only parts of it is unacceptable.”
  • Con el tiempo todo se consigue.
    • Swedish equivalent: Time heals all wounds.
  • Como midais sereis medidos.
    • English equivalent: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
  • Con la gente no es temible la muerte.
    • Literal translation: With people, death is not fearsome.
  • Corazón no es traidor.
    • English equivalent: The heart sees farther than the head.
    • “We are double in ourselves, so that what we believe we disbelieve, and cannot rid ourselves of what we condemn.” As quoted in The Complete Works of Michael de Montaigne (1877) edited by William Carew Hazlitt, p. 289
  • Cuando la cabeza duele todos los miembros duelen.
    • English equivalent: When the head is sick, the whole body is sick.
  • Cuando las barbas de tu vecino veas cortar, pon las tuyas a remojar.
    • Translation: When you see your neighbour’s beard being cut, put yours in water.
    • Meaning: Be cautious when you see disgraces to people near you.
  • Cuando todos dicen que eres asno, rebuzna y ponte rabo.
    • English equivalent: When all men say you are an ass, it is time to bray.
  • Cuando te dieren un condado, agárrale.
    • English equivalent: When the pig is proffered, hold up the poke.
  • Cuando tu amigo pide, no hay mañana.
    • English equivalent: When thy friend asks, let there be no to-morrow.
  • Cuando una puerta se cierra, ciento se abren.
    • English equivalent: When one door closes another opens.
    • Meaning: “When baffled in one direction a man of energy will not despair, but will find another way to his object.”
  • Cuanto menos se diga, mejor.
    • English equivalent: Least said, soonest mended.
    • Meaning: “In private animosities and verbal contentions, where angry passions are apt to rise, and irritating, if not profane expressions are often made use of, as we sometimes see to be the case, not only among neighbors, but in families, between husbands and wives, or parents and children, or the children themselves and other members of the household, – the least said, the better in general. By multiplying words, cases often grow worse instead of better.”
  • Cuídame del agua mansa, que de la brava, yo sólo me cuidaré.
    • English equivalent: Still water runs deep.
  • Cuidado ajeno de pelo ruelga.
    • English equivalent: No one knows where the shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
    • Meaning: “Nobody can fully understand another person’s hardship or suffering.”
  • Dar al diablo lo que es debido.
    • English equivalent: Give the devil his due.
    • “Bad conduct soils the finest ornament more than filth.” Plautus, Mostellaria, I. 3. 133.
  • De buenas intenciones esta empedrado el camino al infierno.
    • English equivalent: The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
  • De grandes cenas están las sepulteras llenas.
    • English equivalent: Gluttony kills more than the sword.
  • De malas costumbres nacen buenas leyes.
    • English equivalent: Good laws have sprung from bad customs.
    • “Socialism, like the ancient ideas from which it springs, confuses the distinction between government and society. As a result of this, every time we object to a thing being done by government, the socialists conclude that we object to its being done at all. We disapprove of state education. Then the socialists say that we are opposed to any education. We object to a state religion. Then the socialists say that we want no religion at all. We object to a state-enforced equality. Then they say that we are against equality. And so on, and so on. It is as if the socialists were to accuse us of not wanting persons to eat because we do not want the state to raise grain.” Frédéric Bastiat, The Law (1850)å
  • Del mal el menos.
    • English equivalent: Of two evils choose the least.
    • “If you are forced to choose between two options, both of which are undesirable, all you can do is choose the one that is less undesirable than the other.”
  • De noche los gatos Todos son Pardos.
    • English equivalent: At night all cats are grey.
  • Debajo del sayal hay mal.
    • English equivalent: Judge not a man and things at first sight.
    • “No good Book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first.” Thomas Carlyle, Essays, “Novalis” (1829)
  • Despues de los años mil, Torna el agua a su carril.
    • English equivalent: It will all be the same a hundred years hence.
  • Devolver bien por mal.
    • English equivalent: If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.
    • Meaning: Make something good out of bad things that has happened to you.
  • b
    • English equivalent: A fool may give a wise man counsel.
    • “Even as the fingers of the two hands are equal, so are human beings equal to one another. No one has any right, nor any preference to claim over another. You are brothers.” Muhammad, The Last Sermon of Muhammad delivered on the Ninth Day of Dhul Hijjah 10 A.H (c. 630 AD)
  • Dime con quién andas, y te diré quién eres.
    • English equivalent: A man is known by the company he keeps.
  • Dime con quien andas y te diré quién eres..
    • Literal translation: Tell me who you walk with, and I will tell you who you are.
    • Meaning/use: According to your friends, mates, etc. you will be either a good person or a not so good person.
  • Dinero guardado, dinero capado.
    • Translation: The hidden things of wisdom and a treasure that is not seen, what profit is in them both?
    • English equivalent: Money is there to be spent.
  • Dios que de la llaga, de la medicina.
    • English equivalent: God who gives the wound gives the salve.
  • Dios me libre de hombre de un libro.
    • English equivalent: Fear the man of one book.
    • “Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.” Douglas Adams, Last Chance to See (1990)
  • Dios mejora, las horas.
    • English equivalent: After rain comes sunshine.
  • Dios tarda, pero no olvida.
    • Translation: God is slow, but he does not forget.
    • English equivalent: Punishment is lame but it comes.
  • Dividar para reinar.
    • Translation: Divide to rule.
    • English equivalent: Divide and conquer.
    • Meaning: “The best way to conquer or control a group of people is by encouraging them to fight among themselves rather than allowing them to unite in opposition to the ruling authority.”
  • Dolor comunicado, dolor alviado.
    • English equivalent: A problem shared is a problem halved.
  • Donde comen dos, comen tres..
    • Literal translation: Wherever two people eat, three people eat.
    • Meaning/use: You can add one person more in any situation you are managing.
  • Dueña yo dueña tu, ¿quién botará la puerca afuera?
    • Translation: You a lady, I a lady who is to drive out the sow?
    • English equivalent: There are too many chiefs and not enough indians.
  • Echar margaritas á puercos.
    • English equivalent: Do not throw pearls before swine.
  • El amor es ciego.
    • Literal translation: Love is blind
    • Meaning/use: We are blind to the defects and failings of our beloved (person or thing).
  • El amor todo lo iguala.
    • Literal translation: Love smoothes life out.
    • Meaning/use: Love makes difficulties endurable.
  • El mejor escribano echa un borrón.
    • Literal translation: The best scribe makes a blot.
    • Meaning/use: Excuses a first-time fault, especially of a very able person.
  • El tiempo todo lo cura.
    • Literal translation: Time cures all.
    • Meaning/use: There are problems, ills and circumstances that are only healed with the passing of time, either by them being actually solved or by us learning to cope with them.
  • El abismo llama al abismo
    • English equivalent: Deep calls to deep.
    • “((Orion) A hunter of shadows, himself a shade.” Homer, Odyssey, XI. 572. (~ 800 BC)
  • El mejor no vale nada.
    • English equivalent: Bad is the best choice.
    • “I always search good in bad. l also search bad in good.” Vennu Malesh, It’s My Life (2012)
  • El peresozo siempre es menesteroso.
    • English equivalent: Poverty is the reward of idleness.
    • “Trust not yourself; but your defects to know,
  • El ciego no distingue colores.
    • English equivalent: A blind man should not judge of colours.
    • “An uneducated man cannot judge of the attainments of the learned.”
  • El dìa que te casas, o te matas o te sanas.
    • English equivalents: Choose a wife rather by your ear than your eye.
    • “Use great prudence and circumspection, in choosing thy wife, for from thence will spring all thy future good or evil; and it is an action of life like unto a stratagem of war, wherein a man can err but once.” William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, Certain Precepts Or Directions for the Well-Ordering and Carriage of a Man’s Life (c. 1584, first published 1617)
  • El favo es dulce, mas pica la abeja.
    • English equivalent: He that will not endure the bitter will not live to see the sweet.
  • El fruto no cae lejos del árbol.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • “Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.”
  • El hijo de la gata ratones mata.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • “Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.”
  • El hilo siempre se rompe por lo más delgado.
    • English equivalent: A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
    • “A weak part or member will affect the success or effectiveness of the whole.”
  • El lenguaje de la verdad es sencillo.
    • English equivalent: Truth gives a short answer, lies go round about.
    • “You do so love to talk in riddles. Do you do that, I wonder as a substitute for having anything interesting to say?” Dan Houser, Michael Unsworth and Christian Cantamessa, Read Dead Redemption (2010)
  • El mejor nadador es del agua.
    • Translation: The best swimmer is from the water.
  • El miedo no es tonto.
    • English equivalent: Discretion is the better part of valor.
  • El peresozo siempre es menesteroso.
    • English equivalent: Poverty is the reward of idleness.
  • El perro ladra y la caravana pasa.
    • English equivalent: The dogs bark but the caravan passes on.
    • “Whatever any one does or says, I must be good.” Aurelius Antoninus, Meditations (161 BC)
  • El pez grande se come al chico.
    • English equivalent: Men are like fish; the great ones devour the small.
    • “Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful.”
  • El poeta nace, el orador se hace.
    • English equivalent: Poets are born, but orators are trained.
  • El ruin pajarillo, Descubra su nidillo.
    • English equivalent: Don’t wash your dirty linen in public; It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest.
    • “Why wantonly proclaim one’s own disgrace, or expose the faults or weaknesses of one’s kindred or people?”
    • “It is considered contemptible to defy the rule of solidarity by revealing facts harmful to the group one belongs to.”
  • El que no es conmigo, contra mí es.
    • English equivalent: He who is not with me is against me.
    • “Friends are those who believe in us and who want to help us whatever it is that we are trying to achieve.”
    • Aung San Suu Kyi, Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought Acceptance Speech by Aung San Suu Kyi, Strasbourg, 22 October 2013
    • Originally from the Bible, Luke 11:23 and Matthew 12:30. Specificed as a proverb in (Strauss, 1994 p. 974)
  • El que jugó, jugará.
    • English equivalent: Once a drunkard always a drunkard; Once a thief always a thief.
    • “People keep telling us who they are, but we ignore it – because we want them to be who we want them to be.” Lisa Albert, Janet Leahy, Matthew Weiner, Mad Men (2010)
  • El que no es envidiado, es que no es afortunado.
    • English equivalent: No enemies is a sign that fortune has forgotten you.
  • El que se ahoga, se agarra a un perlo
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
  • El que súbito se determina, súbito se arrepiente.
    • English equivalent: Hasty judgment leads to repentance.
  • El tiempo perdido los santos lo lloran.
    • English equivalent: Time is precious.
    • “Days are of the least pretension, and of the greatest capacity of anything that exists. They come and go like muffled and veiled figures sent from a distant friendly party; but they say nothing, and if we do not use the gifts they bring, they carry them as silently away.” Ralph Waldo Emerson, Works and Days. (1904)
  • El problema es cómo hay más gente interesada que gente interesante.
      • Literal translation and English equivalent: The problem is how there’s more people interested than people interesting.
      • Meaning/use: There are more people that are interested in others than there are people that are interesting to others.
  • El tiempo y la marea no esperan al rey.
    • English equivalent: Time and tide wait for no man.
    • “The negligent and unreflecting man resolves to accomplish a certain important object at some future period; but in the intervening time, some preparatory, though in itself comparatively trifling business, is indispensable. At length the period for accomplishing the ultimate object arrives: but, alas! the prerequisite, so absolutely connected and essential, is neglected, and then, vain man!”
  • El trabajo según la paga.
    • English equivalent: You get what you pay for.
    • “The quality of goods and services is reflected in their price – cheap things are usually inferior and expensive things are usually superior.”
  • En boca cerrada ni moscas ni nada.
    • English equivalent: A still tongue keeps a cool head.
    • “I have often regretted my speech, never my silence.” Publilius Syrus, Sententiae (100 B.C)
  • En casa del ahorcado, no se ha de mentar la soga.
    • English equivalent: Name not a rope in his house who hanged himself.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). National proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 86.
  • En casa del herrero, cuchillo de palo.
    • English equivalents: The shoemaker goes barefoot.
    • “Working hard for others one may neglect one’s own needs or the needs of those closest to him.”
  • En la duda, abstente.
    • English equivalent: When in doubt, don’t.
    • “If you are unsure what to do, it is best to do nothing at all.”
  • En la tardanza suele estar el peligroso.
    • English equivalent: Delays are dangerous.
    • “Hesitation or procastination may lead to trouble or disaster.”
  • En tierra de ciegos, el tuerto es rey.
    • English equivalent: Among the blind, the one-eyed is king.
    • “People of only limited capability can succeed when surrounded by those who are even less able than themselves.”
  • En toda cosa hay que considerar el fin.
    • English equivalent: Whatever you do, act wisely, and consider the end.
  • Entre dos muelas cordales nunca pongas tus pulgares.
    • English equivalent: Don’t go between the tree and the bark.
  • Es más fácil ver la paja en ojo ajeno que la viga en el propio (taken from the Bible, Matthew, 7:3-5)
    • English equivalent: We see the mote in anothers eye but not the beam in our own.
  • Es un hombre sin honor, el que piense mal de esta acción.
    • English equivalent: Shame take him that shame thinketh.
    • “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.” Robert J. Hanlon, Murphy’s Law Book Two : More Reasons Why Things Go Wrong! (1980)
  • Estar en Roma y no ver el papa.
    • English equivalent: He was in Rome and did not see the pope.
  • El mal escribano le echa la culpa a la pluma
    • English equivalent: A bad workman blames his tools.
  • El saber es fuerza.
    • English equivalent: Learning is the eye of the mind.
    • “An education isn’t how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It’s being able to differentiate between what you do know and what you don’t.”
    • William Feather As quoted in Telephony, Vol. 150 (1956), p. 23; the first two sentences of this statement began to be attributed to Anatole France in the 1990s, but without any citations of sources.
  • El que no oye consejo no llega a viejo.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed is the least heeded.
  • El que tiene frio sopla el fuego.
    • English equivalent: Let him that is cold blow the coals.
    • “My definition of success is doing what you love. I feel many people do things because they feel they have to, and are hesitant to risk following their passion.” Tony Hawk, American businessman, entrepreneur, skateboard pro. Interviewed by Gary Cohn for Entrepreneur Magazine (October 2009)
  • Es cosa de dos.
    • English equivalent: It takes two to tango.
  • Es el tono que hace la música.
    • English equivalent: It is not what you do, but the way that you do it.
    • “We must not be wise and prudent according to the flesh, but, instead, we must be simple, humble and pure.” Francis of Assisi, “Later Admonition and Exhortation to the Brothers and Sisters of Penance,” Francis of Assisi: Early Documents, (1220)
  • Es mejor tostón asegurado que dime apostado.
    • English equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • “Something you have for certain now is of more value than something better you may get, especially if you risk losing what you have in order to get it.”
  • Es muy frecuente la risa en la boca del necio.
    • English equivalent: A fool is ever laughing.
  • Es peor el remedio que la enfermedad.
    • Translation: The remedy is often worse than the disease; Burn not your house to rid it off the mouse.
    • “Action taken to put something right is often more unpleasant or damaging than the original problem.”
  • Excusa no pedida, la culpa manifesta.
    • English equivalent: A guilty conscience needs no accuser.
    • “People who know they have done wrong reveal their guilt by the things they say or the way they interpret what other people say.”
  • Fue por lana y salió trasquilado.
    • (He/She) went looking for wool and came back shorn.
    • Interpretations:
      • If you go for something it might end up biting you
      • you woo someone but end up heartbroken.
      • you try to cheat someone but get cheated yourself.
      • Chasing glamour will get you fleeced. All that glitters isn’t gold.
  • Gato escaldato del aqua fria há miedo.
    • English equivalent: A burnt child dreads the fire.
  • Gobernar es prever.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of preventions is better than a pound of cure.
  • Guarda mozo, y hallarás viejo.
    • English equivalent: Diligent youth makes easy age.
  • Hay gato encerrado.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap, for snakes among sweet flowers do creep.
  • Haz lo que dice el fraile, y no lo que hace.
    • English equivalent: Preachers say: do as I say, not as i do.
  • Hacer de una pulga un elefante.
    • English equivalent: Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.
  • Hechos dan testimonio, que no las palabras.
    • English equivalent: No need of words, trust deeds.
    • “Actions may be, and indeed sometimes are deceptive in a measure though not as much so as words; and accordingly are received in general as more full and satisfactory proofs of the real disposition and character of persons than verbal expressions.”
  • Hijo de gato, caza ratón
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
  • Hombre prevenido vale por dos.
    • English equivalent: Forewarned is forearmed.
  • Hoy por mí y mañana por tí.
    • English equivalent: Today me, tomorrow thee.
  • Quien con el diablo haya de comer, larga cuchara ha menester.
    • English equivalent: He who sups with the devil must use a long spoon.
  • Jugar con fuego es peligroso.
    • English equivalent: Do not play with edged tools.
  • La carne más sabrosa es la que está junta al hueso.
    • English equivalent: The sweetest flesh is near the bones.
  • La dicha de la fea, la linda de la desea .
    • English equivalent: Handsome is that handsome does.
    • “People should be valued for their good deeds, not their good looks, also occasionally used of things, or as a warning not to be misled by an attractive appearance.”
  • La envidia es la sombra de la gloria.
    • English equivalent: Envy always shooteth at a high mark.
  • La envidia no muere jamás.
    • English equivalent: Envy takes no holiday.
  • La historia se repite.
    • English equivalent: Something that has happened once can happen again.
  • La mayoría es razón.
    • English equivalent: What everybody says must be true.
  • La mayor dicha o desdicha del hombre es la mujer.
    • English equivalent: A cheerful wife is the spice of life.
  • La mejor defensa es el ataque.
    • English equivalent: The best defence is a good offense.
    • “You are more likely to win if you take the initiative and make an attack rather than preparing to defend yourself.”
  • La necesidad hace a la vieja trotar.
    • English equivalent: Necessity has no law.
  • La ropa sucia se lava en casa.
    • English equivalent: It’s an ill bird that fouls its own nest.
  • La salud ante todo.
    • English equivalent: Good health is above wealth.
  • La serpiente se oculta en la hierba.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap, for snakes among sweet flowers do creep.
  • La voz del pueblo es voz de Dios.
    • English equivalent: The voice of the people is the voice of god.
  • La segunda idea suele ser mejor.
    • English equivalent: Second thoughts are the best.
    • “It is often said that second thoughts are best. So they are in matters of judgment, but not in matters of conscience. In matters of duty, first thoughts are commonly best. They have more in them of the voice of God.” John Henry Newman, Parochial and Plain Sermons: Volume IV (1838), Sermon 2
  • Las parablas no cuentan.
    • English equivalent: Eggs and oaths are soon broken.
  • La unión hace la fuerza.
    • English equivalent: United we stand, divided we fall; Union is strength.
  • La avaricia rompe el saco.
    • Literal meaning: Greed bursts the sack.
    • Meaning/use: Greed and excessive ambition can stand in the way of obtaining benefit or success.
    • Comments: This Spanish proverb evokes the image of a thief using a sack to carry the objects he steals. When the sack fills up he presses down its contents to make more fit in, making it break and losing his whole loot.
  • La cara es el espejo del alma.
    • Literal translation: The face is the mirror of the soul.
    • Meaning/use: Our face reflects our state of health, our character, and our mood.
    • Origin: Cicero (106-43 BC): ‘Ut imago est animi voltus sic indices oculi’
  • La diligencia es la madre de la buena ventura.
      • Literal translation: Diligence is the mother of good fortune.
      • Meaning/use: One must be active and diligent in order to achieve one’s goals.
  • La fe mueve montañas.
    • Literal translation: Faith moves mountains.
    • Meaning/use: Praises the power of the confidence that faith endows us with.
  • La mejor palabra siempre es la que queda por decir.
    • Literal translation: The best word is the one left unsaid.
    • Meaning/use: Sings the praises of prudence in talk.
  • La peor gallina es la que más cacarea.
    • Literal translation: The worst hen is the one that clucks the most.
    • Meaning/use: It is not rare to see a person boasting and wishing to stand out even though his merits are few and his qualities inadequate.
  • La sangre sin fuego hierve.
    • Literal translation: Blood boils without fire.
    • Meaning/use: Comments on the strength of blood bonds.
  • La suerte está echada.
    • English equivalent: The die is cast.
    • Meaning/use: Said in the face of a threatening situation the outcome of which one is unable to prevent.
    • Origin/Comments: Julius Caesar is reputed to have said Alea iacta est after having crossed the Rubicon river with his legions.
  • La vida no es un camino de rosas.
    • Literal translation: Life is not a path of roses.
    • Meaning/use: It’s normal to encounter all kinds of difficulties along the road of life.
  • Las burlas se vuelven veras.
    • Literal translation: Bad jokes become reality.
    • Meaning/use: One should be careful when joking to avoid being hurting or offensive. Burlas and veras when used in relationship with one another, the first means “jokingly” and the second “really”.
  • Las desgracias nunca vienen solas.
    • Literal translation: Misfortunes never come one at a time.
    • Meaning/uses: Said when several annoyances or setbacks occur at the same time or follow closely one another.
    • English equivalents: When it rains, it pours. It never rains but it pours.
    • Similar Spanish proverb: Un mal llama a otro.
  • Las ratas abandonan el barco que se hunde.
    • English equivalent: Rats desert a sinking ship.
  • Ladroncillo de agujeta, después sube a barjuleta.
    • English equivalent: He that steals an egg will steal an ox.
  • Lavandera mala no encuentra jamás buena piedra.
  • Translation: A bad washer doesn’t ever find a good rock.
    • English equivalent: A bad craftsman blames his tools.
  • Las aguas quietas calan hondo.
    • Translation: Still waters run deep.
    • English equivalent: Still waters run deep.
  • Las aparencias engañan.
    • English equivalent: Appearances deceive.
  • En la variedad está el gusto.
    • English equivalent: Variety is the spice of life.
  • Lo barato cuesta caro.
    • English equivalent: If you buy cheaply, you pay dearly.
  • Lo que mal empieza, mal termina.
    • English equivalent: A bad beginning makes a bad ending.
    • “It is as impossible that a system radically erroneous, once commenced, should end well, as it is that a mathematical problem, commenced wrong, should come out right.”
  • Lo que no mata, engorda.
  • Alt: Mugre (mierda) que no mata, engorda.
  • Alt: Veneno que no mata, engorda. (Peru)
    • English equivalent: What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. (Nietzsche)
  • Lo que puedes sólo, no esperes a otro.
    • English equivalent: For what thou canst do thyself, rely not on another.
  • Los grandes ingenios se encuentran.
    • English equivalent: Great minds agree.
  • Los primeros serán postreros.
    • English equivalent: The last will be first, and the first last.
  • Lo comido es lo seguro.
    • Literal translation: You can only be really certain of what is already in your belly.
    • Meaning/use: When confronted with a choice between something certain and something uncertain, this Spanish proverb is used to gravitate towards the first.
  • Los años no pasan en balde.
    • Literal translation: Years don’t pass in vain.
    • Meaning/use: Resign oneself to the ravages of time, particularly illness and old age.
    • English equivalent: Years take their toll.
  • Los árboles no dejan ver el bosque.
    • English equivalent: One can’t see the forest for the trees.
    • Meaning/use: Attention to detail can make one lose perspective.
  • Los celos son malos consejeros.
    • Literal translation: Jealousy is a bad counsellor.
    • Meaning/use: Jealousy does not lead to sensible behaviour.
  • Los tiempos cambian.
    • Literal translation: Times change.
    • Meaning/use: Exhorts to adapt to changing circumstances and not indulge in lamentations and useless comparisons.
  • Mañana será otro día.
    • Literal translation: Tomorrow will be another day.
    • Meaning/use: Recommends to let matters rest and leave for another day and a clearer head the search for a solution to a problem or situation.
    • Variation: Mañana será otro día, y verá el tuerto los espárragos.
  • Mezclar churras con merinas.
    • Literal translation and English equivalent: Mix churra with merino.
    • Meaning/use: Confusing things that are totally different.
    • Comments: Churra and Merino are two breeds of Spanish sheep, the former excelling at milk and meat while the latter excelling at wool. When they tried to inter-breed both sheep hoping to get the best of both breeds, the outcome was a total disaster.
  • Manos besa el hombre, que querria ver cortadas.
    • English equivalent: Many kiss the hand they wish cut off.
  • Más lejos ven los sesos que los ojos.
    • English equivalent: The eye looks but it is the mind that sees.
  • Mas vale algo que nada
    • English equivalent: Better a lean jade than an empty halter.
  • Más vale andarse soltero que con mal compañero.
    • English equivalent: Better be alone than in bad company.
  • Más vale pájaro en mano que ciento volando.
    • English equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
  • Más vale un presente que dos después.
    • English equivalent: One today is worth ten tomorrows.
  • Mas valé punada de natural que almorzada de ciencia.
    • English equivalent: Nature is beyond all teaching.
  • Mas vale rodear que no ahogar.
    • English equivalent: Better go about than fall into the ditch.
  • Mas vale saber que hablar (haber).
    • English equivalent: A good mind possess a kingdom.
  • Mas vale tarde que nunca.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • “It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all.”
  • Más sabe el diablo por viejo que por diablo.
    • Alt: Sabe más el diablo por viejo que por diablo.
    • Translation: The devil knows more because he’s old, than because he is devil.
    • Interpretations: With age comes wisdom.
  • ¡Médico, cúrate a ti mismo!
    • English equivalent: Physician, heal yourself!
  • Mejor es doblar que quebrar.
    • English equivalent: Better bow than break.
    • “It is better to make some confession, or pay a little deference to others, our neighbors, friends, acquaintances, and especially our superiors, rather than lose our credit or break friendship.”
  • Mejor es el fin que los medios.
    • English equivalent: Crooked logs make straight fires.
  • Menea la cola el can, no por ti, sino por el pan.
    • English equivalent: Dogs wags their tail, not so much to you as your bread.
  • Meted las manos en vuestro seno, veréis vuestro mal y no el ajeno.
    • English equivalent: Forget other faults remembering your own; Forgive and forget.
  • Mientras la hierba crece el caballo muere.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows the steed starves.
  • Mirar antes de saltar.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap.
    • “The man who thinks before he acts, is most likely to act with discretion, and have no future cause to repent of his conduct; but he who acts blindly, without any foresight, will probably suffer for his rashness.”
  • Mucha paya y poco grano; es por vicio del verano.
    • English equivalent: Great cry and little wool.
    • “Much ado about nothing.”
  • Muchos amenes al cielo llegan.
    • English equivalent: Short prayers reach heaven.
  • Mucho tiene que hacer quien ha de gustar á todos.
    • English equivalent: He had need rise early who would please everybody.
    • “It is impossible to do something that everybody will approve of.”
  • Muchos golpes derriban un roble.
    • English equivalent: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • “A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time.”
  • Nada hay nuevo debajo del sol.
    • English equivalent: Nothing is new.
  • Nadie da palos de balde.
    • English equivalent: You don’t get nothing for nothing; The only free cheese is in the mouse trap.
    • “Everything has to be paid for, directly or indirectly, in money or in kind.”
  • Nadie es indispensable.
    • English equivalent: No man is indispensable.
  • Nadie puede ser juez en causa propia.
    • English equivalent: No one can be the judge in his own case.
  • Necio es quien piensa que otros no piensan.
    • English equivalent: He is a fool that thinks not another thinks.
  • Ni de amigo reconcilado, ni de manjar dos veces guisado.
    • English equivalent: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
  • No dejes camino viejo por sendero nuevo.
    • English equivalent: A short cut is often a wrong cut.
  • No dejes para mañana lo que puedas hacer hoy.
    • English equivalent: Leave nothing for tomorrow what can be done today.
  • No fies mujer de fraile, ni barajes con alcade.
    • English equivalent: A king’s favour is no inheritance.
  • No hay cerrudura, si es de oro la ganzua.
    • English equivalent: A golden key opens any gate but that of heaven.
  • No hay enemigo pequeño.
    • English equivalent: There is no little enemy.
  • No hay mal que por bien no venga.
    • English equivalent: Every cloud has a silver lining.
  • No hay peor burla, Que la verdadera.
    • English equivalent: Many a true words are spoken in jest.
    • “A joke’s a very serious thing.” Charles Churchill, The Ghost (1763), book iv, line 1386
  • No hay peor ciego que el que no quiere ver.
    • English equivalent: There are none so blind as they who will not see.
  • No hay peor sordo que el que no quiere oír.
    • English equivalent: None so deaf as those who will not hear.
  • No hay regla sin excepción.
    • English equivalent: There is no rule without an exception.
  • No hay que dejar lo segur por lo dudoso
    • English equivalent: He that leaves certainty and sticks to chance,
      When fools pipe, he may dance.
  • No hay que jugar con le salud.
    • English equivalent: Don’t burn the candles at both ends.
  • No hay tal ciencia como tener paciencia.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of patience is worth a pound of brains.
  • No hay tal razón como la del bastón.
    • English equivalent: Accusing is proving, when malice and force sit judges; The wolf finds a reason for taking the lamb.
  • No pidas perdon antes de ser acusado.
    • English equivalent: Never ask pardon before you are accused.
  • No se pierde todo lo que está en peligro.
    • English equivalent: Bitter pills may have blessed effects.
    • “Present afflictions may tend to our future good.”
  • No te arrepientas nunca de haber comido poco.
    • English equivalent: Feed sparingly and defy the physician.
  • No todas las verdades son para dichas.
    • English equivalent: All truths are not to be told.
    • Literal translation: Not every truth should be said.
    • Meaning/use: There are truths one should better keep to oneself.
  • No todo es vero lo que suena el pandero.
    • English equivalent: A story never loses in the telling.
  • No todo lo que brilla es oro.
    • English equivalent: Not everything that glitters is gold.
  • No se cazan liebres al son del tambor.
    • English equivalent: Drumming is not the way to catch a hare.
  • No se puede sacar agua de una piedre.
    • English equivalent: You can’t milk a bull.
  • No vendas la piel del oso antes de cazarlo.
    • English equivalent: Don’t count your chickens before they hatch.
  • Non hay libro tan malo, que no tenga algo bueno.
    • English equivalent: No book was so bad, but some good might be got out of it.
  • Nadie está contento con su suerte.
    • Literal translation: No one is satisfied with his fortune.
    • Meaning/use: Alludes to a person who is forever dissatisfied with his lot and never has enough.
  • Ningún jorobado ve su joroba.
    • Literal translation: No hunchback sees his own hump.
    • Meaning/use: Reprehends a person who criticizes others for defects which are also his own, maybe even more acutely so.
  • No cantan dos gallos en un gallinero.
    • Literal translation: Two roosters do not crow in a henhouse.
    • Meaning/use: Peace is disrupted when two want to impose their authority at the same time and place.
  • No hay harina sin salvado.
    • Literal translation: No flour without bran.
    • Meaning/use: One can’t have everything in life, there are always drawbacks.
  • No por mucho madrugar, amanece más temprano..
    • Literal translation: No matter if you rise early because it does not sunrise earlier.
    • Meaning/use: Things have its moment, you can be in hurry but you will not get anything.
  • No se puede hacer tortilla sin romper los huevos.
    • Literal translation: One can’t make an omelette without breaking eggs.
    • Meaning/use: Alludes to the effort necessary to achieve a goal and the damage that may be done in the course of creating something new.
  • No todo el monte es orégano.
    • Literal translation: The whole hillside is not covered in spice.
    • Meanings/uses: In any endeavor, not everything is easy and pleasurable. Indicates that things are not what one imagined them to be.
    • Comments: Oregano is an aromatic plant used as a spice. It symbolizes easiness, benefit and good, since it was once used as a remedy against many illnesses. The word “oregano” is of Greek origin and means “plant that gladdens the hill”.
  • Nunca llueve a gusto de todos.
    • Literal translation: It never rains to everyone’s taste.
    • Meaning/use: What some find agreeable and pleasurable others find bothersome and annoying.
  • Obra de comun, obra de ningun.
    • English equivalent: Everyone’s business is no ones business.
    • “Matters that are of general concern, but are the responsibility of nobody in particular, tend to get neglected because everybody thinks that somebody else should deal with them.”
  • Oro es lo que oro vale.
    • English equivalent: Everything is worth its price.
  • Para curar no basta la intencion.
    • English equivalent: It is not wise to open old wounds.
  • Para eurar no basta la intencion.
    • English equivalent: Least said, soonest mended.
  • Para todo hay comentario.
    • English equivalent: Every why hath its wherefore.
    • “Everything has an underlying reason.”
  • Pato, ganso y ansarón, tres cosas suena y una son.
    • English equivalent: Goose, gander and gosling are three sounds but one thing.
  • Perro ladrador, poco mordedor.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite. / All bark, no bite.
    • “Threatening does not always lead to action: Harsh words may disguise a different feeling, intention or ability.”
    • Meaning/use: Those who threaten very often likely will not able to carry out these threats.
  • Peso y medida quitan al hombre fatiga.
    • Translation: Weight and measure take man fatigue.
  • Piedra sin agua no aguza en la fragua.
    • English equivalent: From nothing nothing can come.
  • Poner el carro antes los bueyes.
    • Translation: To set the cart before the horse.
    • English equivalent: Don’t put the cart before the horse.
    • “It is important to do things in the right or natural order.”
  • Preso por uno preso por ciento.
    • English equivalent: In for a penny in for a pound.
  • Presto hay un bastón para dar al perro.
    • English equivalent: A stick is easily found to beat a dog.
  • Por un gustazo, un trancazo.
    • Literal translation: Pride comes before fall.
  • Por una parte se pierde el todo.
    • English equivalent: A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
  • Cual es Maria, tal hija cría .
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • “Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and rarely.”
  • Quien á mano agena espera, mal yanta y peor cena.
    • English equivalent: He that waits on another man’s trencher, makes many a late dinner.
  • Quien mala cama hace, En ella se hace.
    • English equivalent: As you make your bed, so you must lie.
    • “You must put up with the unpleasant results of a foolish action or decision.”
  • Qué bonito es ver la lluvia y no mojarse.
    • English equivalent: Criticism is easy, but art is difficult.
  • Quien acheja por agujero, ve su duelo.
    • English equivalent: Eavesdroppers hear no good of themselves.
    • “People who eavesdrop on the conversations of others risk hearing unfavorable comments about themselves; used as a warning or reprimand.”
  • Quien bien ama, tarde se olvida.
    • English equivalent: True love never rusts.
  • Quien en año quiere ser rico, al medio le ahorcan.
    • English equivalent: No one gets rich quickly if he is honest.
  • Quien bien quiere a Pedro, no hace mal a su perro.
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my dog.
  • Quien da luego, da dos veces.
    • English equivalent: He gives twice, who gives in a trice.
  • Quien espera, desespera
    • English equivalent: Who lives by hope will die of hunger.
  • Quien mal siembra, mal coge.
    • English equivalent: Sow thin, shear thin.
    • “The success of most things depends upon knowing how long it will take to succeed.” Charles de Montesquieu, Pensées Diverses (1879)
  • Quien no adoba gotera, hace casa entera.
    • English equivalent: A stitch in time saves nine.
    • “No one needs to be told that a vast deal of labor is expended unnecessarily. This is occasioned, to a great extent, by the neglect of seasonable repairs.”
  • Quien no oye consejo, no llega a viejo.
    • Literal translation: Who does not hear advice, does not get old.
  • Quien no tiene cabeza, debe tener piernas.
    • English equivalent: Who falls short in the head must be long in the heels.
  • Quien pájaro ha de tomar, no ha de ojear.
    • English equivalent: Deal gently with the bird you mean to catch.
    • “When people are just, they need friendship in addition.” Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (c. 325 BC), Book VIII, 1155.a26
  • Quien pide no escoge.
    • Translation: He who asks does not get to choose.
    • English equivalent: Beggars must be no choosers.
  • Quien primero llega, ese la calza.
    • English equivalent: First come, first served.
  • Quien quiera peces, que moje el culo.
    • English equivalent: Birds fly not into our mouth ready roasted.
    • “One cannot (or should not) expect to benefit without making some effort.”
  • Quien quiere celeste, que le cueste
    • Translation: He who wants the heavens must pay.
    • “Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter! Woe unto them that are wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight!” The Bible, Isaiah 5:12 – 21.
  • Quien saltar quiere lejos, debe medir la distancia.
    • English equivalent: One must step back to take a good leap.
    • “Information processing keeps going on even when we are not aware of it, even while we are asleep.”
  • Quien tiene cola de paja no debe arrimarse al fuego.
    • English equivalent: He that hath a head of wax must not walk in the sun.
  • Quien tiene hijos o ovejas, no le faltan quejas.
    • English equivalent: Children are uncertain comforts but certain cares.
    • “Children are bound to cause their parents anxiety, and may or may not also bring them joy.”
  • Quien cuando puede no quiere, cuando quiere no puede.
    • English equivalent: He that will not when he may, when he will he may have nay.
    • “Take advantage of an opportunity when it presents itself, even if you do not want or need it at the time, because it may no longer be available when you do.”
  • Roba bien quien a ladron roba.
    • English equivalent: Set a thief to catch a thief.
  • Saca agua de las piedras.
    • English equivalent: All is fish that comes to the net.
    • “Anything that comes along is accepted and turned to advantage.”
    • A similar meaning: “… when we do not upbraid circumstances or indulge in self reproach, the mind is the mind and nothing untoward can occur. Chersterton rightly says ‘An adventure is only an inconvenience rightly understood. An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered'” Blyth, R.H. (1976). Games Zen Masters Play. Mentor. p. 43.
  • Si adelante no vas, altrasarás.
    • English equivalent: He who does not advance goes backwards.
  • Si cazares, no te alabes; si no cazares, no te enfades.
    • English equivalent: If fortune favours, beware of being exalted; if fortune thunders, beware of being overwhelmed.
  • Si el cielo se cae nos cojerá debajo.
    • English equivalent: If the sky falls, we shall catch larks.
    • “The Lark is a lofty Bird, and foars perhaps as high as any of the Inhabitants of the airy Regions; and if there be no other way of coming at them, till the Sky falling down on their Heads beats them down into our Hands, we shall be little the better for ’em. This Proverb is ufually apply’d to Such Perfons who buoy themfelves up with vain Hopes, but in Embryo, ill conceived … to laft till their Accomplifhment.” says Mr. Bailey. He somewhat unpedagogically remarks that “A lark is better than a kite” for “a little which is good, is better than a great deal of that which is good for nothing.”
  • Si el rio suena es porque piedras trae.
    • English equivalent: “where there’s smoke there’s fire.”
  • Si la montaña no va a Mahoma, Mahoma íra a la montaña
    • Note: From an English proverb. The earliest appearance of the phrase is from Chapter 12 of the Essays of Francis Bacon, published in 1625.
    • English equivalent: If the mountain will not come to Mohammed, Mohammed must go to the mountain.
    • “If you cannot get what you want, you must adapt yourself to the circumstances or adopt a different approach.”
  • Si no como queremos pasamos como podemos.
    • English equivalent: Do as you may, if you can’t do as you could.
  • Si vale la pena hacerlo, vale la pena hacerlo bien.
    • English equivalent: If a job is worth doing, it is worth doing well.
    • Duty makes us do things well, but love makes us do them beautifully.” Phillips Brooks, as quoted in Primary Education (1916) by Elizabeth Peabody, p. 190
  • Sin razón se queja del mar quien otra vez navega.
    • English equivalent: He complains wrongfully at the sea that suffer shipwreck twice.
  • Sin tentacion no hay victoria.
    • English equivalent: Without temptation there is no victory.
  • Duerme en ello, y tomarás consejo
    • English equivalent: Take counsel of one’s pillow.
  • Sol que mucho madruga, poco dura.
    • English equivalent: Early ripe, early rotten.
  • Sólo se tiran piedras al árbol cargado de fruto.
    • English equivalent: if you have no enemies it is a sign that fortune has forgotten you; People throw stones only at trees with fruit on them.
  • Tal padre, tal hijo.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • “Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.”
  • Todo camino vá á Rome.
    • English equivalent: All roads lead to Rome.
  • Todos los caminos llevan a Roma.
    • Literal translation and English equivalent: All roads lead to Rome.
    • Meaning/use: Goals can be achieved by different means.
  • Toma las cosas como vienen.
    • English equivalent: Take things as you find them.
    • “We should not plan and then try to make circumstances fit those plans. Instead we should make plans fit the circumstances.” George S. Patton, War as I Knew It (1947)
  • Un clavo saca a otro clavo.
    • English equivalent: One nail drives out another.
    • “As one nail by strength drives out another, So the remembrance of my former love Is by a newer object quite forgotten.” William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (1592)
  • Una golondrina no hace verano.
    • English equivalent: A swallow doesn’t make summer.
  • Vale más huir, que morir.
    • English equivalent: He who fights and runs away may live to fight another day.
    • “It is wiser to withdraw from a situation that you cannot win than to go on fighting and lose – by a strategic retreat you can return to the battle or argument with renewed energy at a later date.”
  • Zapatero, a tus zapatos.
    • English equivalent: Shoemaker, stick to your last or Cobbler, stick to thy last.

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