Prophets Of Christianity

Here is the list of prophets in Christianity.

In Christianity, the figures widely recognised as prophets are those mentioned as such in the Old Testament and the New Testament. It is believed that prophets are chosen and called by God.

The main list below consists of only those individuals that have been clearly defined as prophets, either by explicit statement or strong contextual implication, (e.g. the purported authors of the books listed as the major prophets and minor prophets) along with the Biblical reference to their office.

In Roman Catholicism, prophets are recognised as having received either public or private revelation. Public revelation is part of the “deposit of faith”, which refers to the entire revelation of Jesus Christ passed to successive generations in the forms of sacred scripture (the Bible) and sacred tradition.

The secondary list consists of those individuals who are recorded as having had a visionary or prophetic experience but without a history of any major or consistent prophetic calling. A final list contains the names of those described in the Bible as prophets, but are presented as either misusing this gift or as fraudulent.

The main list of prophets (68)

A

  • Aaron
  • Azariah (2 Chronicles 15:1–8)

D

  • Daniel (Matthew 24:15)
  • David (Hebrews 11:32)
  • Deborah (Judges 4:4)

E

G

  • Gad (1 Samuel 22:5)
  • Gideon (Judges 6 through 8)

H

  • Habakkuk (Habakkuk 1:1)
  • Haggai (Haggai 1:1)
  • Hanani (2 Chronicles 16:7)
  • Hosea (Hosea 1:1)
  • Huldah (2 Kings 22:14)

I

  • Iddo (2 Chronicles 13:22)
  • Isaac (Genesis 26:2–7)
  • Isaiah (2 Kings 19:2)

J

John the Baptist (right) with child Jesus, in the painting The Holy Children with a Shell by Bartolomé Esteban Perez Murillo

John the Baptist (right) with child Jesus, in the painting The Holy Children with a Shell by Bartolomé Esteban Perez Murillo

  • Jacob (Genesis 28:11–16)
  • Jehu (1 Kings 16:7)
  • Jeremiah (Jeremiah 20:2)
  • Joel (Acts 2:16)
  • John the Baptist (Luke 7:28)
  • John of Patmos (Revelation 1:1–3)
  • Jonah (2 Kings 14:25)
  • Joshua (Joshua 1:1)
  • Judas Barsabbas (Acts 3:15)
  • Job (Job 1:1)

L

  • Lamech (Genesis 5:28–29)
  • Lucius of Cyrene (Acts 13:1)

M

  • Malachi (Malachi 1:1)
  • Manahen (Acts 13:1)
  • Micah (Micah 1:1)
  • Micaiah (1 Kings 22:9)
  • Miriam (Exodus 15:20)
  • Moses (Deuteronomy 34:10)

N

  • Nahum (Nahum 1:1)
  • Nathan (2 Samuel 7:2)
  • Noah (Genesis 7:1)

O

  • Obadiah (Obadiah 1:1)
  • Oded (2 Chronicles 15:8) Father of Azariah the prophet
  • Oded (2 Chronicles 28:9)

P

  • Philip the Evangelist (Acts 8:26) Note: His four daughters also prophesied (Acts 21:8, 9)
  • Paul the Apostle (Acts of the Apostles 9:20)

S

  • Samuel (1 Samuel 3:20)
  • Shemaiah (1 Kings 12:22)
  • Silas (Acts 15:32)
  • Simeon Niger (Acts 13:1)

T

  • Two Witnesses (Revelation 11:3)

U

  • Uriah (Jeremiah 26:20)

Z

  • Zechariah, son of Berechiah (Zechariah 1:1)
  • Zechariah, son of Jehoiada (2 Chronicles 24:20)
  • Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1)

Fifteen named people with prophetic experiences and 70 elders

Horace Vernet, Jeremiah on the ruins of Jerusalem (1844)

Horace Vernet, Jeremiah on the ruins of Jerusalem (1844)

  • Ananias of Damascus (Acts 9:10–18)
  • Eldad (Numbers 11:26)
  • Eliezer (2 Chronicles 20:37)
  • Elisabeth, mother of John the Baptist (Luke 1:41)
  • Elihu (Job 32–35)
  • Jahaziel (2 Chronicles 20:14)
  • Joseph (Genesis 37:5–11)
  • Joseph, foster father of Jesus (Matthew 1:20)
  • Mary, mother of Jesus (Luke 1:26–28)
  • Medad (Numbers 11:26)
  • King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (Daniel 2:1)
  • Saul (1 Samuel 10:10)
  • Simeon of Jerusalem (Luke 2:25, 26)
  • Solomon (1 Kings 3:5)
  • The seventy elders of Israel (Numbers 11:25)
  • Zechariah, father of John the Baptist (Luke 1:67)

Seven unnamed prophets and men of God

  • A prophet (Judges 6:8–10)
  • A man of God (1 Samuel 2:27–36)
  • A man of God from Judah (1 Kings 13:1)
  • An old prophet from Bethel (1 Kings 13:11)
  • A prophet (1 Kings 20:13,22)
  • A man of God (1 Kings 20:28)
  • One of the sons of the prophets (1 Kings 20:35–42)
  • A man of God (2 Chronicles 25:7–9)
  • A prophet (2 Chronicles 25:15–16)

Eleven false prophets and false prophets of Baal

Main article: False prophet

  • Ahab, son of Kolaiah (Jeremiah 29:21–23)
  • Antichrist (1 John 2:18–19)
  • Azur (Jeremiah 28:1)
  • Balaam (Book of Numbers 22–25)
  • Elymas (a.k.a. Bar-Jesus) (Acts 13:6–12)
  • Hananiah (Jeremiah 28:5)
  • Jezebel (Revelation 2:20) (not to be confused with the Jezebel of the Old Testament)
  • The false prophet of the Book of Revelation (16:13, 19:20, 20:10)
  • The false prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:13–40)
  • Noadiah (Nehemiah 6:14)
  • Shemaiah the Nehelamite (Jeremiah 29:24)
  • Simon Magus (Acts 8:9–24)
  • Zedekiah, son of Maaseiah (Jeremiah 29:21)
  • Zedekiah 1 Kings (22:24)

Claimed post-Biblical prophets

The following persons are considered by some Christians to be prophets or to have had prophetic experiences.

  • Quadratus of Athens (2nd century, sometimes considered one of the seventy apostles)
  • Montanus, Prisca, and Maximilla (2nd century, founders of Montanism)
  • Quintilla (3rd century, founder of an offshoot movement from Montanism)
  • Iarlaithe mac Loga (6th century, founder of the School of Tuam)
  • Merlin (6th century, likely invented by Geoffrey of Monmouth from older legends, first appears in the Prophetiae Merlini)
  • Palladius of Embrun (6th century, Bishop of Embrun)
  • Columba (521–597, credited with spreading Christianity in Scotland)
  • Saint Malachy (1094–1148, Archbishop of Armagh and author of Prophecy of the Popes)
  • James Salomoni (1231-1314)
  • Joan of Arc (1412–1431)
  • Nostradamus (1503–1566)
  • Justus Velsius (1510-1571, Dutch faith healer who debated against John Calvin)
  • Eleanor Davies (poet) (1590–1652)
  • Ann Bathurst (17th century, member of the Philadelphians)
  • Martha Hatfield (17th century, Puritan)
  • John Bull (prophet) and Richard Farnham (17th century, claimed to be the two witnesses of the Book of Revelation)
  • Margareta i Kumla (17th century, claimed to have seen angels and demons fight over her soul)
  • John Robins (prophet) (17th century, Ranter rescued from Roundhead recourse by recanting his revelations)
  • Anne Wentworth (prophetess) (17th century, persecuted by Baptists)
  • Mary Cary (prophetess) (1621-1653, supporter of the Fifth Monarchists)
  • Eva Margareta Frölich (1650–1692) (Millennialist, pietist author and critic of the Church of Sweden)
  • Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772, founder of Swedenborgianism)
  • Joanna Southcott (1750-1814, author of prophecies kept in a box to be opened in times of national crisis, claimed judgement day would happen in 2004)
  • Public Universal Friend (1752–1819, preacher who claims to have died and been reborn without gender)
  • George Rapp (1757-1847, founder of the Harmony Society)
  • John Ward (prophet) (1781–1837, claimed successor of Joanna Southcott)
  • William Miller (preacher) (1782–1849, founder of Adventism)
  • John Wroe (1782–1863, founder of the Christian Israelite Church)
  • Bernhard Müller (1788-1834, founder of an offshoot from the Harmony Society, that would later start the Germantown Colony)
  • Helena Ekblom (1790–1859, Swedish preacher who was put in an asylum for refusing to comply with the Church of Sweden’s doctrines)
  • Joseph Smith (1805–1844, founder of the Latter Day Saint movement)
  • Hong Xiuquan (1814-1864, founder of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom)
  • John Bosco (1815–1888, founder of the Salesians of Don Bosco)
  • Mary Baker Eddy (1821–1910, founder of Christian Science)
  • Ellen G. White (1827–1915, founder of the Seventh-day Adventist Church)
  • John Alexander Dowie (1847–1907, founder of the Christ Community Church)
  • Nona L. Brooks (1861-1945, founder of the Church of Divine Science)
  • Siener van Rensburg (1864-1926, advisor to Koos de la Rey, influenced the Suidlanders)
  • E. W. Kenyon (1867–1948, possible line of transmission between the New Thought and Word of Faith movements)
  • Helena Konttinen (1871-1916, a “Sleeping preacher” who started a revivalist movement)
  • Felix Manalo (1886-1963, founder of the Iglesia ni Cristo)
  • Padre Pio (1887–1968, Catholic saint, purportedly predicted the papacy of John Paul II)
  • William M. Branham (1909–1965, influence on televangelism)
  • A. A. Allen (1911–1970, Pentecostal evangelist and faith healer)
  • Kenneth Hagin (1917–2003, pioneer of the Word of Faith movement)
  • Oral Roberts (1918–2009, considered the godfather of the charismatic movement, founder of the Oral Roberts Evangelistic Association and Oral Roberts University)
  • T. L. Osborn (1923–2013, Pentecostal evangelist and musician)
  • Pat Robertson (1930-present, chairman of the Christian Broadcasting Network, host of The 700 Club, noted for controversial statements)
  • David Wilkerson (1931–2011, author of The Cross and the Switchblade and founder of the Teen Challenge)
  • Reverend Ike (1935-2009, noted for his slogan “You can’t lose with the stuff I use!”)
  • Kenneth Copeland (1936-present day, televangelist noted advocate of prosperity theology, and for claiming to have ended the COVID-19 pandemic)
  • Robert Tilton (1946-present day, televangelist noted for his prosperity theology infomercials and questionable fundraising practices).
  • Roch Thériault (1947-2011, founder of a polygamous doomsday cult called the Ant Hill Kids)
  • John Paul Jackson (1950-2015, author noted for dream interpretation)
  • Benny Hinn (1952-present day, televangelist noted for faith healing and prosperity theology)
  • Kim Clement (1956-2016)
  • David Koresh (1959–1993, leader of the Branch Davidians during the Waco siege)
  • Creflo Dollar (1962-present day, televangelist noted for prosperity theology)
  • T. B. Joshua (1963–2021, televangelist and founder of Synagogue, Church of All Nations)
  • Joshua Iginla (1969-present day, televangelist, prosperity theology preacher, and megachurch pastor)
  • Jeremiah Omoto Fufeyin (1972-present day, founder of the Christ Mercyland Deliverance Ministry, criticized for flamboyant ministry)
  • Daniel Obinim (1977-present day, minister noted for controversial actions and statements)

See also

Adapted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia