Buddhist texts can be categorized in a number of ways. The Western terms “scripture” and “canonical” are applied to Buddhism in inconsistent ways by Western scholars. Buddhist traditions have generally divided these texts with their own categories and divisions, such as that between buddhavacana “word of the Buddha,” many of which are known as “sutras,” and other texts, such as shastras (treatises) or Abhidharma.

Tripiṭaka By Wiki

Tripiṭaka From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Tripiṭaka is a traditional term used by various Buddhist sects to describe their various canons of scriptures.[1] As the name suggests, a Tripiṭaka traditionally contains three “baskets” of teachings: a Sūtra Piṭaka (Sanskrit; Pali: Sutta Pitaka), a Vinaya Piṭaka (Sanskrit & Pali) and an...

Vinaya By Wiki

Vinaya From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Vinaya (a word in Pāli as well as in Sanskrit, with literal meaning ‘leading out’, ‘education’, ‘discipline’) is the regulatory framework for the Buddhist monastic community, or sangha, based in the canonical texts called Vinaya Pitaka. The teachings of the Buddha, or Buddhadharma...

Vimalakirti Sutra By Wiki

Vimalakirti Sutra From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia     Vimalakīrti debating Bodhisattva Mañjuśrī. Chinese painting from the Dunhuang Caves, Tang Dynasty. The Vimalakīrti Nirdeśa Sūtra (Sanskrit: विमलकीर्ति निर्देश सूत्र), or Vimalakīrti Sūtra, is a Mahāyāna Buddhist sūtra. The sutra teaches, among other subjects, the meaning of nonduality. It contains a...

Theravada By Wiki

Theravada From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Theravada, Sanskrit: स्थविरवाद sthaviravāda, ; literally, “the Teaching of the Elders” or “the Ancient Teaching,” is the oldest surviving Buddhist school. It was founded in India. It is relatively conservative, and generally closer to early Buddhism,[1] and for many centuries has been the predominant...

Tengyur By Wiki

Tengyur From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Tengyur or Tanjur is the Tibetan collection of commentaries to the Buddhist teachings, or “Translated Treatises”. The Beijing version covers 3,626 texts in 224 volumes, but numbers vary depending on the version.   Printing the scriptures. Sera Monastery.   The Buddhist Canon To...

Tantras By Wiki

Tantras From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Tantras (“Looms” or “Weavings“) refers to numerous and varied scriptures pertaining to any of several esoteric traditions rooted in Hindu and Buddhist philosophy. Although Buddhist and Hindu Tantra have many similarities from the outside, they do have some clear distinctions. The rest of this...

Pāli Canon By Wiki

Pāli Canon From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia     Standard edition of the Thai Pali Canon The Pāli Canon is the standard collection of scriptures in the Theravada Buddhist tradition, as preserved in the Pāli language.[1] It is the most complete extant early Buddhist canon.[2] It was composed in North...

Mahayana Sutras By Wiki

Mahayana Sutras From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Mahāyāna sutras are a broad genre of Buddhist scriptures that are accepted as canonical by the various traditions of Mahāyāna Buddhism. These are largely preserved in the Chinese Buddhist canon, the Tibetan Buddhist canon, and in extant Sanskrit manuscripts. Some six hundred Mahāyāna...

Mahayana By Wiki

Mahayana From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Mahāyāna (Sanskrit: महायान mahāyāna, literally the “Great Vehicle”) is one of the two main existing branches of Buddhism and a term for classification of Buddhist philosophies and practice. Mahāyāna Buddhism originated in India,[1] and is associated with the oldest historical sect of Buddhism, the...

Buddhism’s Sacred Texts

Buddhist texts From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia     Jump to navigationJump to search   Stone inscriptions of the World’s largest book at Kuthodaw, Myanmar Buddhist texts were initially passed on orally by monks, but were later written down and composed as manuscripts in various Indo-Aryan languages which were then translated into other local languages as Buddhism spread....

Kangyur By Wiki

Kangyur From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Tibetan Buddhist canon is a loosely defined list of sacred texts recognized by various schools of Tibetan Buddhism, made up of the Kangyur or Kanjur (‘The Translation of the Word’) and the Tengyur or Tanjur (Tengyur) (‘Translation of Treatises’).   Woodblock printing of...

Avatamsaka Sutra

>Sudhana learning from one of the fifty-two teachers along his journey toward enlightenment. Sanskrit manuscript, 11-12th century.

Belief in the Resurrection in Indian religions

>During history, there have been many religions in India, although it is highly probable that these religions are the distorted varieties of a single true religion. However greatly they have been distorted, almost all of them contain the principle of belief in the Resurrection and eternity. In many of these...

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