What Satan Is And Why He Was Created?

What Satan Is And Why He Was Created? Satan was created from fire, like the jinn with whom he mostly kept company. Before his obedience and sincerity was tested through Adam, he had been in the company of angels, acting and worshipping as they did. Unlike angels who follow orders...

Devil

What Is Devil or Shaitan? Shayāṭīn (شياطين), singular: Shayṭān (شيطان‎) are evil spirits, comparable to demons or devils, in Islamic theology and mythology. Usually, the shayatin are regarded as the offspring of Iblis, but other beings, such as evil jinn, idols[1] and fallen angels [2][3] are also referred to as shayatin. From an ontological perspective, the shayatin are all beings, which became a manifestation of evil and ugliness.[4] Surah 6:112 collectively refers to the...

Turkish Siyah Qalam depiction of Iblis, appearing as a black man wearing a headcover.

Iblis

What Is Iblis? Iblīs (or Eblis)[1] is a figure frequently occurring in the Quran, commonly in relation to the creation of Adam and the command to prostrate himself before him. After he refused, he was cast out of heaven. For many classical scholars, he was an angel,[2][3] but regarded as a jinn in most contemporary scholarship.[4] Due to his fall from God’s...

Zulqarnayn with the help of some jinn, building the Iron Wall to keep the barbarian Gog and Magog from civilized peoples (16th century Persian miniature)

What Is Jinn?

Jinn Djinn (الجن‎, al-jinn), also Romanized as djinn or Anglicized as genies (with the more broad meaning of spirits or demons, depending on source)[1][2] are supernatural creatures in Islam. Besides the jinn, Islam acknowledges the existence of demons (Shayāṭīn). The lines between demons and jinn are blurred, since malevolent jinn are also called shayāṭīn.[3][4] However both Islam and Western scholarship generally distinguishes between angels, jinn and demons (shayāṭīn) as three...

What Is Jinni?

Jinni Jinni, plural jinn, also called genie, Arabic jinnī, in Arabic mythology, a supernatural spirit below the level of angels and devils. Ghūl (treacherous spirits of changing shape), ʿifrīt (diabolic, evil spirits), and siʿlā (treacherous spirits of invariable form) constitute classes of jinn. Jinn are beings of flame or air who are capable of assuming human or animal form and are...

Jinn And Their Functions

Jinn And Their Functions The literal meaning of jinn is “something hidden or veiled from sight.” As mentioned earlier, jinn are a species of invisible beings. A short Qur’anic chapter is named for them, and in it we learn that a band of jinn listened to Prophet Muhammad, upon him...

Jinn And Human Beings

Jinn And Human Beings Contact With Jinn And Their Influence On Human Beings Some people can go into a trance and contact beings from the invisible realms. However, we should remember that whether these are angels or jinn, invisible beings have their own conditions of life and are bound to...

Nafs In Islam

Nafs Nafs (نَفْس) is an Arabic word occurring in the Quran, literally meaning “self”, and has been translated as “psyche”, “ego” or “soul”.[1][2] In the Quran, the word is used in both the individualistic (verse 2:48) and collective sense (verse 4:1), indicating that although humanity is united in possessing the positive qualities of a nafs, they...

Soul in The Bible

Soul in The Bible The traditional concept of an immaterial and immortal soul distinct from the body was not found in Judaism before the Babylonian exile,[1] but developed as a result of interaction with Persian and Hellenistic philosophies.[2] Accordingly, the Hebrew word נֶ֫פֶשׁ‬, nephesh, although translated as “soul” in some older English Bibles, actually has a meaning closer to “living being”. Nephesh was rendered in...

Christian Mortalism

Christian Mortalism Christian mortalism incorporates the belief that the human soul is not naturally immortal;[1][2][3][4][5] and may include the belief that the soul is uncomprehending during the time between bodily death and resurrection,[6][7][8][9][10] known as the intermediate state. “Soul sleep” is an often pejorative term[11][a][14] so the more neutral term “materialism” was also used in the nineteenth century,[15] and “Christian mortalism” since...

Atma flying – Atma

Ātman In Hinduism

Ātman (Hinduism) The six orthodox schools of Hinduism believe that there is Ātman (soul, self) in every being. This is a major point of difference with the Buddhist doctrine of Anatta which holds that there is no unchanging soul or self.[6][7][8]Ātman is a Sanskrit word that means inner self or soul.[1][2][3] In Hindu philosophy, especially in the Vedanta school of Hinduism, Ātman is the first principle,[4] the true self of an...

Buddha

Ātman In Buddhism

Ātman (Buddhism) Most Buddhist traditions and texts reject the premise of a permanent, unchanging atman (self, soul).[2][3] However, some Buddhist schools, sutras and tantras present the notion of an atman or permanent “Self”, although mostly referring to an Absolute and not to a personal self.Ātman (/ˈɑːtmən/), attā or attan in Buddhism is the concept of self, and is found in Buddhist literature’s discussion of...

Jiva, Jainism

Jīva In Jainism

Jīva in Jainism The Jīva or Atman (आत्मन्) is a philosophical term used within Jainism to identify the soul.[1] As per the Jain cosmology, jīva or soul is the principle of sentience and is one of the tattvas or one of the fundamental substances forming part of the universe. The Jain metaphysics, states Jagmanderlal Jaini, divides the universe into two independent, everlasting, co-existing and uncreated...

Vitalism In Jainism

Vitalism in Jainism Vitalism is at the core of Jain philosophy which separates Jiva (soul or life) from Ajiva (non-soul). According to Jain cosmology, whole universe is made up of six simple substances and is therefore eternal. These six substances (dravya) are:- Jiva Time Space Dharma (medium of motion) Adharma Matter (Pudgala) Jiva or soul is distinguished from the rest...

Jainism

Jainism And Non-creationism

Jainism And Non-creationism Jainism does not support belief in a creator deity. According to Jain doctrine, the universe and its constituents—soul, matter, space, time, and principles of motion—have always existed. All the constituents and actions are governed by universal natural laws. It is not possible to create matter out of nothing and hence the sum total...

Fragment from Egyptian Book of the Dead

Ancient Egyptian Concept Of The Soul

Ancient Egyptian Concept Of The Soul The ancient Egyptians believed that a soul (ka/ba) was made up of many parts. In addition to these components of the soul, there was the human body. According to ancient Egyptian creation myths, the god Atum created the world out of chaos, utilizing his own magic.[1] Because the earth was created with...

History Of The Location Of The Soul

History Of The Location Of The Soul The search for a hypothetical soul and its location have been a subject of much speculation throughout history. In early medicine and anatomy the location of the soul was hypothesized and studied to be physically located within the body. Today neuroscientists and other fields of science that...

Exorcism in Islam

Exorcism in Islam Exorcism in Islam is called (ruqya), and is thought to repair damage believed caused by jinn possession[1][2][3] witchcraft (shir) or the evil eye. Exorcisms today are part of a wider body of contemporary Islamic alternative medicine[4] called al-Tibb al-Nabawi (Medicine of the Prophet). Islamic religious context Further information: Shaitan and Jinn Belief in Jinns, and other supernatural beings, is widespread...

Baptism

Minor Exorcism In Christianity

Minor Exorcism In Christianity The expression minor exorcism can be used in a technical sense or a general sense. The general sense[1] indicates any exorcism which is not a solemn exorcism of a person believed to be possessed, including various forms of deliverance ministry. This article deals only with the technical sense which specifically refers to certain...

Exorcism In The Catholic Church

Exorcism In The Catholic Church The Catholic Church authorizes the use of exorcism for those who are believed to be the victims of demonic possession. In Roman Catholicism, exorcism is sacramental[1][2] but not a sacrament, unlike baptism or confession. Unlike a sacrament, exorcism’s “integrity and efficacy do not depend … on the rigid use of an unchanging formula or on the...

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