Talmud

Organ Donation In Jewish Law

Organ Donation In Jewish Law Certain fundamental Jewish law questions arise in issues of organ donation. Donation of an organ from a living person to save another’s life, where the donor’s health will not appreciably suffer,[1] is permitted and encouraged in Jewish law. Donation of an organ from a dead person is equally...

Jewish Views On Suicide

Jewish Views On Suicide Jewish views on suicide are mixed. In Orthodox Judaism, suicide is forbidden by Jewish law, and viewed as a sin. Non-Orthodox forms of Judaism may instead recognize the act as more akin to a death by a disease or disorder (except in cases of purposeful assisted suicide). Rabbinical scholars (certainly...

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Shekhinah

What Is Shekhinah? The Shekhinah (שכינה‎, šekīnah, Shekina(h)) is the English transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning “dwelling” or “settling” and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God. This term does not occur in the Bible, and is from rabbinic literature.[1]:148[2][3] Main Articles: Sakina and Itmi’nan (Serenity and...

Textual Criticism

Textual Criticism Textual criticism is a branch of textual scholarship, philology, and literary criticism that is concerned with the identification of textual variants in either manuscripts or printed books. Scribes can make alterations when copying manuscripts by hand.[1] Given a manuscript copy, several or many copies, but not the original...

Tzedakah

What Is Tzedakah? Tzedakah or Ṣ’daqah in Classical Hebrew (צדקה‎) (A-Sadaqah الصدقة ), is a Hebrew word literally meaning “justice” or “righteousness”, but commonly used to signify charity. Notably, this concept of “charity” is different from the modern Western understanding of “charity”, which is typically understood as a spontaneous act of goodwill and a marker of...

Aggadah

Aggadah Aggadah (אַגָּדְתָא “tales, lore”) refers to non-legalistic exegetical texts in the classical rabbinic literature of Judaism, particularly as recorded in the Talmud and Midrash. In general, Aggadah is a compendium of rabbinic texts that incorporates folklore, historical anecdotes, moral exhortations, and practical advice in various spheres, from business to...

The Wisdom of the Talmud

The Wisdom of the Talmud A Thousand Years of Jewish Thought By Rabbi BEN ZION BOKSER New York: Philosophical Library [1951] TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION THE TALMUD AS LITERATURE The Bible Requires Supplementation; The Sanctions for Biblical Supplementation; The Method of Midrash Halakah; The Method of Midrash Haggadah; The Midrash as Literature; The...

Prayers From Old Testament

Prayers From Old Testament Abraham’s Intercession for Sodom & Gomorrah Genesis 18:23-33 23 Then Abraham approached him and said: “Will you sweep away the righteous with the wicked? 24 What if there are fifty righteous people in the city? Will you really sweep it away and not spare[a] the place for the sake of...

Talmud

What Is Talmud? The Talmud (תַּלְמוּד talmūd) is the central text of Rabbinic Judaism and the primary source of Jewish religious law (halakha) and Jewish theology.[1][2][3] Until the advent of modernity, in nearly all Jewish communities, the Talmud was the centerpiece of Jewish cultural life and was foundational to “all Jewish thought and aspirations”, serving also...

Midrash

What Is Midrash? Midrash (מִדְרָשׁ; מִדְרָשִׁים midrashim) is biblical exegesis by ancient Judaic authorities,[2] using a mode of interpretation prominent in the Talmud. Midrash and rabbinic readings “discern value in texts, words, and letters, as potential revelatory spaces,” writes the Reverend and Hebrew scholar Wilda C. Gafney. “They reimagine dominant narratival readings while crafting new ones to stand alongside—not...

Closeness To God In The Old Testament

Closeness to God in the Old Testament The Lord is near to all who call on Him, to all who call on Him in truth. (Psalms, 145:18) Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from Him. (Psalms, 62:5) To You, O Lord, I lift up my...

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