Talmud

Rainbow Water River Trees Sunset Nature Landscape

Noahide Laws

Noahide Laws According to Jewish tradition, the Noahide Laws (Hebrew: שבע מצוות בני נח, Sheva mitzvot b’nei Noach), also called the Brit Noah (“Covenant of Noah”) refer to seven religious laws that were given by G-d to Adam and Noah, which are considered to be morally binding on non-Jews. These laws are listed in the Talmud and...

Dead Sea Scrolls

Anger in Judaism

Anger in Judaism Anger in Judaism is treated as a negative trait to be avoided whenever possible. The subject of anger is treated in a range of Jewish sources, from the Bible and Talmud, to Halacha, Kabbalah, Hasidism and contemporary Jewish sources. Main  articles: Sin, What Is Sin? In Tanach In the Book of Genesis, Jacob condemned the anger that...

Toras in Istanbul Ashkenazi Sinagogue

Torah Wisdom from the Jewish Sages

Torah Wisdom from the Jewish Sages Rabbi Simcha Bunam of Pshis’cha – People are not to blame for the fact that they sin. Indeed, they withstand great temptation though their strength is negligible. They are, however to blame for the fact that they do not repent their evil ways, because...

Take The Book Girls The Study Learning Sofa

Wisdom From The Old Testament

Wisdom From The Old Testament Exhortation to Righteousness, the Key to Life 1 Love righteousness,* you who judge the earth;a think of the LORD in goodness, and seek him in integrity of heart;b 2 Because he is found by those who do not test him, and manifests himself to those who...

Psalms

Psalms The Book of Psalms (תְּהִלִּים‬, Tehillim, “praises”), commonly referred to simply as Psalms or “the Psalms”, is the first book of the Ketuvim (“Writings”), the third section of the Hebrew Bible, and thus a book of the Christian Old Testament.[1] The title is derived from the Greek translation, ψαλμοί, psalmoi, meaning “instrumental music” and, by extension, “the words accompanying...

Tallit Synagogue Jewish Hebrew Religious Prayer

Organ Donation In Jewish Law

Organ Donation In Jewish Law Certain fundamental Jewish law questions arise in issues of organ donation. Donation of an organ from a living person to save another’s life, where the donor’s health will not appreciably suffer,[1] is permitted and encouraged in Jewish law. Donation of an organ from a dead person is equally...

Jewish Views On Suicide

Jewish Views On Suicide Jewish views on suicide are mixed. In Orthodox Judaism, suicide is forbidden by Jewish law, and viewed as a sin. Non-Orthodox forms of Judaism may instead recognize the act as more akin to a death by a disease or disorder (except in cases of purposeful assisted suicide). Rabbinical scholars (certainly...

tranquility, peaceful scenery

Shekhinah

What Is Shekhinah? The Shekhinah (שכינה‎, šekīnah, Shekina(h)) is the English transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning “dwelling” or “settling” and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God. This term does not occur in the Bible, and is from rabbinic literature.[1]:148[2][3] Main Articles: Sakina and Itmi’nan (Serenity and...

Textual Criticism

Textual Criticism Textual criticism is a branch of textual scholarship, philology, and literary criticism that is concerned with the identification of textual variants in either manuscripts or printed books. Scribes can make alterations when copying manuscripts by hand.[1] Given a manuscript copy, several or many copies, but not the original...

Tzedakah box (Pushke), Charleston, 1820, silver, National Museum of American Jewish History

Tzedakah

Tzedakah Tzedakah (צדקה‎) is a Hebrew word meaning “righteousness“, but commonly used to signify charity. This concept of “charity” differs from the modern Western understanding of “charity.” The latter is typically understood as a spontaneous act of goodwill and a marker of generosity; tzedakah is an ethical obligation. Tzedakah refers to the religious...

Aggadah

Aggadah Aggadah (אַגָּדְתָא “tales, lore”) refers to non-legalistic exegetical texts in the classical rabbinic literature of Judaism, particularly as recorded in the Talmud and Midrash. In general, Aggadah is a compendium of rabbinic texts that incorporates folklore, historical anecdotes, moral exhortations, and practical advice in various spheres, from business to...

Passages From The Psalms And The Proverbs

Passages From The Psalms And The Proverbs Here are some passages from the Psalms and the Proverbs for blessings. A blessing is a prayer asking for God’s protection, or a little gift from the heavens. It’s also any act of approving, like when your roommate wants to move out and...

The Angel Lailah

The Angel Lailah The angel Lailah or Laylah ( לַיְלָה) is an angel in some interpretations in the Talmud and in some later Jewish mythology. Etymology The name Lailah is the same as the Hebrew word for “night” laylah לילה. The identification of the word “night” as the name of an angel originates with the interpretation of “Rabbi Yochanan” (possibly Yochanan ben Zakkai c. 30...

Old Testament Wisdom

Old Testament Wisdom The didactic books constitute the third group of writings in the Old Testament. They teach man to organize his personal, earthly life in such a way that it will be blessed by God and by men, and may give him prosperity and peace of soul. The wisdom...

Prayers From Old Testament

Prayers From Old Testament Abraham’s Intercession for Sodom & Gomorrah Genesis 18:23-33 23 Then Abraham approached him and said: “Will you sweep away the righteous with the wicked? 24 What if there are fifty righteous people in the city? Will you really sweep it away and not spare[a] the place for the sake of...

Talmud

What is Talmud? The Talmud (תַּלְמוּד talmūd) is the central text of Rabbinic Judaism and the primary source of Jewish religious law (halakha) and Jewish theology.[1][2][3] Until the advent of modernity, in nearly all Jewish communities, the Talmud was the centerpiece of Jewish cultural life and was foundational to “all Jewish thought and aspirations”, serving also...

Midrash

What Is Midrash? Midrash (מִדְרָשׁ; מִדְרָשִׁים midrashim) is biblical exegesis by ancient Judaic authorities, using a mode of interpretation prominent in the Talmud. Midrash and rabbinic readings “discern value in texts, words, and letters, as potential revelatory spaces,” writes the Reverend and Hebrew scholar Wilda C. Gafney. “They reimagine dominant narratival readings while...

Wisdom From The Talmud

Wisdom From The Talmud Talmud is short for ‘Talmud Torah,’ which means “study of the Torah” in Hebrew. The Torah is the Hebrew term for the Pentateuch, the first five books of the Bible (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy.) The Talmud is composed of several volumes of rabbinical discussions...

Scroll Up