Mark

Vulgate

What Is Vulgate? The Vulgate is a late-4th-century Latin translation of the Bible that was to become the Catholic Church’s officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible during the 16th century, and is still used fundamentally in the Latin Church to this day. The translation was largely the work of...

Protestant Bible

Protestant Bible A Protestant Bible is a Christian Bible whose translation or revision was produced by Protestants. Such Bibles comprise 39 books of the Old Testament (according to the Jewish Hebrew Bible canon, known especially to non-Protestants as the protocanonical books) and 27 books of the New Testament for a total of 66 books. Some Protestants use Bibles which also include 14...

Language of The New Testament

Language of The New Testament The New Testament was written in a form of Koine Greek,[1][2] which was the common language of the Eastern Mediterranean[3][4][5][6] from the conquests of Alexander the Great (335–323 BC) until the evolution of Byzantine Greek (c. 600). The Hellenistic Jewish world The New Testament Gospels and Epistles were only part of a Hellenistic Jewish culture in the Roman...

New Testament

New Testament The New Testament (Ancient Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, transl. Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first being the Old Testament. The New Testament discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture....

Apocrypha

What Is Apocrypha? Apocrypha are works, usually written, of unknown authorship or of doubtful origin.[1] Biblical apocrypha is a set of texts included in the Latin Vulgate and Septuagint but not in the Hebrew Bible. While Catholic tradition considers some of these texts to be deuterocanonical, Protestants consider them apocryphal. Thus, Protestant bibles do not include the...

List of Major Textual Variants In The New Testament

List of Major Textual Variants In The New Testament This is an (incomplete) list of major textual variants in the New Testament, with a focus on differences between categories of New Testament manuscript. The Textus Receptus (Latin: “received text”) is the name subsequently given to the succession of printed Greek texts of the New Testament which was...

Historical Criticism

Historical Criticism of Ancient Texts Historical criticism, also known as the historical-critical method or higher criticism, is a branch of criticism that investigates the origins of ancient texts in order to understand “the world behind the text”.[1] While often discussed in terms of Jewish and Christian writings from ancient times, historical criticism has also...

Gospel Harmony

What Is Gospel Harmony? A gospel harmony is an attempt to compile the canonical gospels of the Christian New Testament into a single account.[1] This may take the form either of a single, merged narrative, or a tabular format with one column for each gospel, technically known as a synopsis, although the word harmony is often used for both.[1] Harmonies...

Summary of The Books of The Bible

Summary of The Books of The Bible THE OLD TESTAMENT There are 39 books in the Old Testament, generally separated into 4 divisions: The Pentateuch, traditionally designated as the 5 books of Moses. Historical Books, number 12, from Joshua to Esther. Poetical Books, number 4, from Job to Song of...

Q Source

What Is Q Source? The Q source (also called Q document, Q Gospel, or Q from German: Quelle, meaning “source”) is a hypothetical written collection of primarily Jesus’ sayings (logia). Q is part of the common material found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke but not in the Gospel of Mark. According to this hypothesis, this material was drawn from the...

Who Decides What To Include Into Bibles?

Who Decides What To Include Into Bibles? Old Testament books that are included in the Bibles used by Roman Catholic and Orthodox Christians, but not in the Bibles used by most Protestant Christians and Jews. All Christians and Jews include the 39 books commonly known as the Old Testament in...

Who Are The Real Authors Of Gospels?

Who Are The Real Authors Of Gospels? Has the Gospel borrowed historical accounts describing Jesus from previous Eastern scriptures which existed centuries before the Bible? Krishna was depicted as if crucified. The Persian remembered only the atoning sufferings on the cross of Mithras the Mediator. Aztecs prayed for the return...

Which Bible Do You Believe?

Which Bible Do You Believe? There is a violent debate amongst Christians regarding which Bible to use. We would think all the Bibles are the same since they claim each one is by God. Some of them are lacking some words even some verses. Here we will compare the Bibles....

The Unreliability Of Gospels

The Unreliability Of Gospels The Gospels were composed after the early Christians had become divided into different factions. They were in fact composed to propagate the special teachings of the various schools and their authors showed no hesitation in tampering with the earlier documents and other traditional material regarding the...

Novum Testamentum Graece

Novum Testamentum Graece Novum Testamentum Graece (The New Testament in Greek) is a critical edition of the New Testament in its original Koine Greek, forming the basis of most modern Bible translations and biblical criticism. It is also known as the Nestle-Aland edition after its most influential editors, Eberhard Nestle and Kurt Aland. The text, edited by the Institute for New Testament Textual Research, is...

Internal Consistency of The Bible

Internal Consistency of The Bible The internal consistency of the Bible concerns the coherence and textual integrity of the Bible. Disputes regarding biblical consistency have a long history. Classic texts that discuss questions of inconsistency from a critical secular perspective include the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus by Baruch Spinoza, the Dictionnaire philosophique of Voltaire, the Encyclopédie of Denis Diderot and The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine.[1]...

Synoptic Gospels

Synoptic Gospels The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke are referred to as the Synoptic Gospels because they include many of the same stories, often in a similar sequence and in similar or sometimes identical wording. They stand in contrast to John, whose content is largely distinct. The term synoptic (Latin: synopticus) comes via Latin from the Greek σύνοψις, synopsis, i.e. “(a) seeing...

Gospel of Mark

Gospel of Mark The Gospel According to Mark is one of the four canonical gospels and one of the three synoptic gospels. It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist to his death and burial and the discovery of the empty tomb – there is no genealogy of Jesus or birth narrative, nor, in the original ending at chapter...

Gospel

What Is The Gospel? Gospel originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.[1] The four canonical gospels — Matthew, Mark, Luke and John — were written between AD 70 and 100,[2][3] building on older sources...

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