Romanian Proverbs

The Romanians (Romanian: români or—historically, but now a seldom-used regionalism—rumâni) are an Eastern Romance ethnic group and nation native to Romania, that share a common Romanian culture, ancestry, and speak the Romanian language, the most widespread spoken Balkan Romance language which is descended from the Latin language. According to the 2011 Romanian census, just under 89% of Romania’s citizens identified themselves as ethnic Romanians.

Proverbs from all Romanian speaking parts of the world.

Romanian Proverbs

A bad workman quarrels with his tools. – English & Romanian Proverb

A barber learns to shave by shaving fools. – Romanian Proverb

A change of rulers is the joy of fools. – Romanian Proverb

A child is a blessing for any man’s roof. – Romanian Proverb

A clear sky fears not the thunder. – Romanian Proverb

A cunning person’s kiss is like that of a mosquito. – Romanian Proverb

A disease known is half cured. – Romanian Proverb

A dog dies from too much walking , a fool from worrying about other’s business. – Romanian Proverb

A dog doesn’t enter if the door is not open. – Romanian Proverb

A fence with supports is not overthrown by high winds. – Romanian Proverb

A foreigner scratches you where you do not itch. – Romanian Proverb

A foreigner’s pity is like a thorn’s shadow. – Romanian Proverb

A girl in her time is like honey in the comb. – Romanian Proverb

A girl’s honesty is like snow: when it melts the whiteness is no longer seen. – Romanian Proverb

A good beginning is half the battle. – Romanian Proverb

A great ship asks for deep waters. – Romanian Proverb

A hungry belly has no ears. – Romanian Proverb

A living dog is better than a dead lion. – Romanian Proverb

A luckless man is like incense without fire. – Romanian Proverb

A man without enemies is like a river without stones. – Romanian Proverb

A mild lamb sucks at two mothers. – Romanian Proverb

A mountain does not meet another mountain, but man meets man. – Romanian Proverb

A relative’s slap hurts more than a stranger’s. – Romanian Proverb

A small log will overthrow a big cart. – Romanian Proverb

A tent without a wife is like a fiddle without a string. – Romanian Proverb

A well-turned lie pays better than the truth. – Romanian Proverb

A woman without a husband is like a distaff without the spindle. – Romanian Proverb

A young woman, like new wine, bubbles. – Romanian Proverb

A  Stones will remain for ever while water passes. – Romanian Proverb

Abundance, like want, ruins many. – Romanian Proverb

Actions speak louder than words. – Romanian Proverb

All complain of their lack of money, none of their want of brains. – Romanian Proverb

All is well that ends well. – Romanian Proverb

An ass is but an ass, even when laden with gold. – Romanian Proverb

An old horse learns not to amble. – Romanian Proverb

Before giving orders learn to submit yourself. – Romanian Proverb

Better a crooked reconcilement than a straight judgment. – Romanian Proverb

Better a man of straw than a woman of gold. – Romanian Proverb

Better a sound donkey than a consumptive philosopher. – Romanian Proverb

Better an egg today than an ox tomorrow. – Romanian Proverb

Better be an eagle for a day than a rook for a whole year. – Romanian Proverb

Better to ask twice than go wrong once. – Romanian Proverb

Better to be a poor man’s son than the slave of a rich. – Romanian Proverb

Borrowed clothes do not keep one warm. – Romanian Proverb

By blackening another you do not whiten yourself. – Romanian Proverb

Catch the thief before he catches you. – Romanian Proverb

Choose a wife to please yourself, not others. – Romanian Proverb

Cloth and a wife, choose them not at night. – Romanian Proverb

Crows gather where the carrion lies. – Romanian Proverb

Do not put your spoon into the pot which does not boil for you. – Romanian Proverb

Do not send your wife alone to a wedding. – Romanian Proverb

Do not set the mill on fire in order to burn the mice. – Romanian Proverb

Do not wake the sleeping lion. – Romanian Proverb

Dogs do not bark at a dead wolf. – Romanian Proverb

Don’t argue with a fool, he has a rested mind. – Romanian Proverb

Don’t give the sparrow in the hand for the crow on the fence. – Romanian Proverb

Don’t leave for tomorrow, what you can do today. – Romanian Proverb

Don’t measure others with your hand. – Romanian Proverb

Don’t sell the fox skin in the wood. – Romanian Proverb

Drink the wine, but not drunk by it. – Romanian Proverb

Early risers travel far away. – Romanian Proverb

Either act as you speak, or speak as you act. – Romanian Proverb

Even a thread of hair has its shadow. – Romanian Proverb

Even God gets out of a drunkard’s way. – Romanian Proverb

Even God who is God cannot please all the world. – Romanian Proverb

Even in paradise it is not pleasant to be alone. – Romanian Proverb

Even the best of women has still a devil’s rib in her. – Romanian Proverb

Even the devil cannot escape a woman. – Romanian Proverb

Every bird dies by its own tongue. – Romanian Proverb

Everything has a beginning. – Romanian Proverb

Everything that flies is not good to eat. – Romanian Proverb

For a lucky man the pot boils without fire. – Romanian Proverb

For a sackful of learning a cartful of wisdom is needed. – Romanian Proverb

From the truth to a lie is but a hand’s breadth. – Romanian Proverb

God Before you find God, you are eaten by the saints. – Romanian Proverb

God is great, but the devil is clever too. – Romanian Proverb

God protect you from a woman’s judgment and a fool’s thrashing. – Romanian Proverb

Good is rewarded with good. – Romanian Proverb

Good wine and a pretty wife are two sweet poisons to a man. – Romanian Proverb

He who burnt himself with soup blows also in the sour milk. – Romanian Proverb

He who drinks on credit gets doubly drunk. – Romanian Proverb

He who grudges the nail, loses the hoof. – Romanian Proverb

He who mixes up with bran is eaten by pigs. – Romanian Proverb

He who steals an egg today, will steal an ox tomorrow. – Romanian Proverb

If a dog barks at you, stop his muzzle with bread. – Romanian Proverb

If a friend is honey, do not try to eat all of him. – Romanian Proverb

If the sun doesn’t come in through the window, the doctor will come in through the door. – Romanian Proverb

If you are the anvil, suffer; if you are the hammer, strike. – Romanian Proverb

If you only kept silent you would have passed for a wise man. – Romanian Proverb

If you wish good advice, consult an old man. – Romanian Proverb

Illness comes in a coach and goes away through the eye of a needle. – Romanian Proverb

In a minstrel’s house everyone dances. – Romanian Proverb

In the house where there are two girls, the cats die of thirst. – Romanian Proverb

In unity lies strength. – Romanian Proverb

 

Romanian Proverbs

In vain you show light to the blind. – Romanian Proverb

It is easier to watch a flock of rabbits than a woman. – Romanian Proverb

It is not good to be the driver of white horses or the servant of women. – Romanian Proverb

It is one thing to promise and another to perform. – Romanian Proverb

It’s the gentle cat that scratches the worst. – Romanian Proverb

Justice is as the rulers make it … and as the people allow it. – Romanian Proverb

Justice is as the rulers make it. – Romanian Proverb

Kiss the hand you cannot bite. – Romanian Proverb

Knotty timber must have sharp wedges. – Romanian Proverb

Knowledge is power. – Romanian Proverb

Let sleeping dogs lie. – Romanian Proverb

Life is a waste if you didn’t live as you would have wanted to. – Romanian Proverb

Little chips light great fires. – Romanian Proverb

Little strokes fell great oaks. – Romanian Proverb

Long absent, soon forgotten. – Romanian Proverb

Look before you leap. – Romanian Proverb

Love beyond measure afterwards brings hatred. – Romanian Proverb

Love of money is the root of all evil. – Romanian Proverb

Luck is like glass: when it starts to shine, it breaks. – Romanian Proverb

Man consecrates the land. – Romanian Proverb

Man has both life and death. – Romanian Proverb

Man is like sheep: one readily follows after another. – Romanian Proverb

Man’s life is like an egg in the hands of a child. – Romanian Proverb

Many hands make light work. – Romanian Proverb

Many see, few understand. – Romanian Proverb

Money is round and rolls easily. – Romanian Proverb

Money is the devil’s eye. – Romanian Proverb

More than we use is more than we want. – Romanian Proverb

My chicken is good, but my neighbor’s looks better. – Romanian Proverb

Nakedness turns around; hunger goes straight. – Romanian Proverb

No matter how far you have gone on a wrong road, turn back. – Turkish Proverb, Romania

No matter how muddy the water, it will quench the fire. – Romanian Proverb

No one takes money for thinking. – Romanian Proverb

No one throws stones at a tree without fruit. – Romanian Proverb

No sky without clouds. – Romanian Proverb

Oil the wheels if you want the cart to run lightly. – Romanian Proverb

One cannot make garments from cobwebs. – Romanian Proverb

One fool creates a mess which ten wise men cannot undo. – Romanian Proverb

One gather while the other one wastes. – Romanian Proverb

One has no need of a guide to the village one can see. – Romanian Proverb

One man laughs at another, and the devil at all. – Romanian Proverb

One man’s mouth destroys cities. – Romanian Proverb

One may become the devil’s brother in order to cross the bridge. – Romanian Proverb

One who sits between two chairs may easily fall down. – Russian Proverb, Romania

One’s home is both paradise and hell. – Romanian Proverb

Only fools are glad when governments change. – Romanian Proverb

Put not pepper in other people’s meals. – Romanian Proverb

Put not your nose in the pot which doesn’t boil for you. – Romanian Proverb

Right goes with a broken head. – Romanian Proverb

See the mother, and then marry the daughter. – Romanian Proverb

Short love brings a long sigh. – Romanian Proverb

Sin enters laughing and comes out crying. – Romanian Proverb

Sit not idle, for your luck sits with you. – Romanian Proverb

Small and great, we all boil in the same caldron. – Romanian Proverb

Smoke and a scolding woman drive one out of the house. – Romanian Proverb

Still waters run deep. – Romanian Proverb

Strike while the iron is hot. – Romanian Proverb

The anvil fears no blow. – Romanian Proverb

The anvil fears no blows. – Romanian Proverb

The apple falls under the apple tree. – Romanian Proverb

The bear doesn’t dance for his own pleasure. – Romanian Proverb

The blessing of having many children has never broken a man’s roof. – Romanian Proverb

The chain is no stronger than its weakest link. – Romanian Proverb

The cuckoo doesn’t sing until he sees the buds of spring. – Romanian Proverb

The cuckoo sings while the lazy man sits and counts. – Romanian Proverb

The dog barks at the moon all night long, but the moon never hears him. – Romanian Proverb

The dogs bark and the caravan passes by… – Romanian Proverb

The eagle does not catch flies. – Romanian Proverb

The egg of a white hen is the same as that of a black one. – Romanian Proverb

The estimate made at home does not hold good at the market. – Romanian Proverb

The eye lets in love. – Romanian Proverb

The fox is cunning, but more cunning is he who catches it. – Romanian Proverb

The goat must browse where she is tied. – Romanian Proverb

The house is burning and Grandma is combing her hair. – Romanian Proverb

The husband doesn’t know what all the village knows. – Romanian Proverb

The intoxication of youth surpasses that of wine. – Romanian Proverb

The law turns on golden wheels. – Romanian Proverb

The lawyers eat the kernel and the parties the shell of the nut. – Romanian Proverb

The lie sinks like a plumb and comes up like a leaf. – Romanian Proverb

The locust lives only a little while, but it does great damage. – Romanian Proverb

The looking-glass is the enemy of ugly women. – Romanian Proverb

The man who goes to law often loses an ox to win a cat. – Romanian Proverb

The mounted man doesn’t believe the man that goes afoot. – Romanian Proverb

The needle is small, but it sews costly garments. – Romanian Proverb

The old dog doesn’t bark without reason. – Romanian Proverb

The one who has a book, has the power. – Romanian Proverb

The one who has knowledge, has four eyes. – Romanian Proverb

The pearl lies at the bottom of the sea, while the corpse floats on the surface. – Romanian Proverb

The rich man’s wealth swallows the morsel of the poor. – Romanian Proverb

The road to hell is paved with good intentions. – Romanian Proverb

The stairs are swept downwards, not upwards. – Romanian Proverb

The sun rises whether the cock crows or not. – Romanian Proverb

The sun warms the good man and bad man equally. – Romanian Proverb

The village is burning and the granny is combing her hair. – Romanian Proverb

The voice of the ass is not heard in heaven. – Romanian Proverb

The wet man fears no rain. – Romanian Proverb

The will is everything. – Romanian Proverb

The wind gathers the clouds and the wind chases them away. – Romanian Proverb

The wolf changes his fur, but never his habits. – Romanian Proverb

The word of slander rings like a bell. – Romanian Proverb

The worst wheel of a cart is the one that makes most noise. – Romanian Proverb

The wound of a knife is easily healed, but the wound in the heart never. – Romanian Proverb

There is no bitterer fruit than foreigners in one’s land. – Romanian Proverb

There is no going to heaven in a sedan. – Romanian Proverb

There is no such thing as a good husband or a sweet onion. – Romanian Proverb

There is no wedding without laughter and no death without tears. – Romanian Proverb

There is no wine without dregs. – Romanian Proverb

There is no wise response to a foolish remark. – Romanian Proverb

There is some respite from a barking dog, but never from wagging tongues. – Romanian Proverb

There’s no smoke without fire. – Romanian Proverb

Thieves increase with the making of new laws. – Romanian Proverb

Thieves nowadays are not in the forests, but in the offices. – Romanian Proverb

Thistle doesn’t catch in smooth cloth. – Romanian Proverb

Three things are not to be lent: the horse, the gun. and the wife. – Romanian Proverb

Throw the good to your left and right, and you’ll find it when you’ll need it. – Romanian Proverb

Time ripens all things. – Romanian Proverb

Truth lies at the bottom of the well. – Romanian Proverb

Under a glove the ugliest hand is hidden. – Romanian Proverb

Under a ragged coat lies wisdom. – Romanian Proverb

Until the baby cries, the mother doesn’t give him suck. – Romanian Proverb

Use your ears to listen, use your eyes to see, but use your mouth to shut up. – Romanian Proverb

Virtue is its own reward. – Romanian Proverb

Water flows, but rocks remain. – Romanian Proverb

Wealth is like a pool: as soon as you dig a channel, it all runs out. – Romanian Proverb

What can’t be cured must be endured. – Romanian Proverb

What is born of a cat will catch mice. – Romanian Proverb

What is everybody’s business is nobody’s business. – Romanian Proverb

What the heart thinks, the tongue speaks. – Romanian Proverb

When a thing is done, advice comes too late. – Romanian Proverb

When it dries up, one knows the worth of the fountain. – Romanian Proverb

When misfortune sleeps, beware of awakening it. – Romanian Proverb

When nuns dance the devil does not weep. – Romanian Proverb

When one pot hits another, both break. – Romanian Proverb

When the cat is not at home the mice dance on the table. – Romanian Proverb

When the devil grew old he became a monk. – Romanian Proverb

When the head does not work, the legs suffer. – Romanian Proverb

When the master is away the mice play on the table. – Romanian Proverb

When you do good, you get good. – Romanian Proverb

Where the liquor is in, the wit is out. – Romanian Proverb

Where there are too many midwives, the baby is left with the umbilical cord uncut. – Romanian Proverb

Where there is love, there is also a quarrel. – Romanian Proverb

Where there is much learning, there is much folly too. – Romanian Proverb

Where there is no head, woe to the feet. – Romanian Proverb

Who flatters you has either cheated you or hopes to do so. – Romanian Proverb

Who talks, sells; who listens, buys. – Romanian Proverb

Who will eat the kernel of the nut must break the shell. – Romanian Proverb

With money one can even buy rabbit cheese. – Romanian Proverb

Woe to the house where the hen crows and the cock keeps silent. – Romanian Proverb

Wolf doesn’t eat wolf. – Romanian Proverb

Work has bitter roots, but sweet fruits. – Romanian Proverb

Work is a golden bracelet. – Romanian Proverb

Worse than the thief himself is the keeper of the thief. – Romanian Proverb

Yesterday will not be called again. – Romanian Proverb

You can’t straighten the world with your shoulder. – Romanian Proverb

You do not know what is good until you lose it. – Romanian Proverb

You need not look after the hoofs of dead horses. – Romanian Proverb

 

Romanian Proverbs

  • Adevărul se spune glumind.
    • English equivalent: Many a true word is spoken in jest.
    •  Se non è vero, è molto ben trovato.
    • If it is not true it is very well invented.
    • Giordano Bruno, De gli heroici furori (1585) [The Heroic Furies; also translated as On Heroic Frenzies], as quoted in A Book of Quotations, Proverbs and Household Words (1907) edited by Sir William Gurney Benham
    • Variant translations:
      If it is not true, it is well conceived.
      If it is not true, it is a good story.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 57.
  • Apa linǎ este adâncă.
    • English equivalent: Still waters run deep.
    • “Slow but steady work can achieve much.” or “That a man says little does not mean that he does not think profoundly.”
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). “78”. European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 373. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 70.
  • Așteaptā, murgule, să paşti iarbă verde.
    • Wait, steed, to graze on green grass.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows, the steed starves.
    • “True heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic. It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost, but the urge to serve others at whatever cost.”
    • Arthur Ashe, s quoted in Worth Repeating : More Than 5,000 Classic and Contemporary Quotes (2003) by Bob Kelly, p. 169.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 96.
  • Calul bun se vinde în grajd.(The good horse is sold even in stable)
    • English equivalent: Good wine needs no bush.
    • “A good product does not need advertising.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 109. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 34.
  • Cine ascultǎ la uşa își aude faima.
    • English equivalent: Eavesdroppers hear no good of themselves.
    • Dave: You know, that son of yours just cursed at me.
      Vicky: Wow, you actually stopped yelling at Larry long enough for him to swear at you?
      Dave: Hey, you know, when I was a kid, I never would have talked to my father that way. I did it behind his back as a sign of respect.
    • Jennifer Glickman, The War at Home (2007)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 51.
  • Cine vrea miezul, să spargă nuca.
    • English equivalentː He that would eat the kernel must crack the nut.
    • “Nothing is achieved without effort.”
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. p. 121. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (194). “784”. Dictionary of European proverbsII (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 680. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Toate cele frumoase, poartă și ponoase.
    • English equivalent: All that is fair must fade
    • “Nothing lasts forever.”
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 21 September 2013. ,
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 10.
  • Cum e tata, e și fiul.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • “Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.”
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Cine aleargă după doi iepuri, nu prinde nici unul.
    • English equivalent: You must not run after two hares at the same time.
    • “Concentrate on one thing at a time or you will achieve nothing. – Trying to do two or more things at a time, when even one on its own needs full effort, means that none of them will be accomplished properly.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). “X”. European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. X. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 102.
  • Cine dă îndatǎ, dă de două ori.
    • English equivalent: He gives twice, who gives in a trice.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 38.
  • Cine nu face când poate nu face când vrea.
    • English equivalent: He that will not when he may, when he will he may have nay.
    • “Take advantage of an opportunity when it presents itself, even if you do not want or need it at the time, because it may no longer be available when you do.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 41.
  • Cine s’a fript cu supa, suflă și-n iaurt.
    • English equivalent: A burnt child dreads the fire.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 2.
  • Cine sapă groapa altuia, cade singur în ea.
    • English equivalent: He who digs a pit for others, will fall in it himself.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 651. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Cine se aseamănă, se adunǎ.
    • English equivalent: Like will to like.
    • “Every man loves well what is like to himself.”
    • Folk-Etymology. Ardent Media. 1886. p. 216.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 51.
  • Cine se laudă singur, se ocărăște pe sine.
    • English equivalent: Don’t blow your own horn.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 71. ISBN 1417964677.
  • Cine se scoală de dimineață, departe ajunge.
    • English equivalent: Eary to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
    • “A lifestyle that involves neither staying up late nor sleeping late is good for body and mind and leads to financial success.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 70. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 5 September 2013.
    • University, Vermont, bi-Yerushalayim (1986). Proverbium. Ohio State University in cooperation with the University of Vermont and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
  • Cine tace nu se căiește.
    • English equivalent: Least said, soonest mended.
    • “In private animosities and verbal contentions, where angry passions are apt to rise, – the least said, the better in general. By multiplying words, cases often grow worse instead of better.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order …. Munroe and Company. pp. 125.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 53.
  • Cu cheia de aur se deschide poarta raiului.
    • English equivalent: A golden key opens any gate but that of heaven.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 8.
  • Cum îți așterni, așa dormi,
    • English equivalent: As you make your bed, so you must lie.
    • “You must put up with the unpleasant results of a foolish action or decision.”
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 7.
  • Copiii, nebunii și bețivii spun adevărul.
    • English equivalent: Children, fools and drunken men tell the truth.
    • “Children and fools have no inhibition, and alcohol consumed removes the inhibition against telling the truth that occasionally one would like to keep secret.”
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 272. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Cu moartea toate diferențele dispar.
    • English equivalent: It will all be the same a hundred years hence.
    • “Trivial problems or mistakes of the present moment have no lasting significance or effect, so there is no point in worrying about them.”
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 145. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • “Woe to him, * * * who has no court of appeal against the world’s judgment.”
    • Thomas Carlyle, Essays, Mirabeau; in Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 411-12.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 48.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 48.
  • Cu picătura se face ploaia.
    • English equivalent: Every little helps.
    • “All contributions, however small, are of use.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 77. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 September 2013.
    • Source for proverbs: Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 26.
  • Cu râma mică, se prinde peștele cel mare.
    • English equivalent: Set a herring to catch a whale.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 16.
  • Cu vânturi nu se vopsesc ouăle roșii.
    • English equivalent: Fine words butter no parsnips.
    • “Mere words have no value unless they are followed by positive action.”
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 9 August 2013.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 31.
  • Cum e mama e și fata.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • “Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and rarely.”
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Cum îți așterni, asa te vei culca.
    • English equivalent: As you make your bed, so you must lie.
    • “You must put up with the unpleasant results of a foolish action or decision.”
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 7.
  • Dă-i, Doamne, mintea românului din urmă.
    • English equivalent: If only I knew then, what I do now.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 73.
  • De nevoie n-ai ce face.
    • English equivalent: Necessity has no law.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 60.
  • Din două rele s-alegi pe cea mai mică.
    • English equivalent: Of two evils choose the least.
    • Meaning: “If you are forced to choose between two options, both of which are undesirable, all you can do is choose the one that is less undesirable than the other.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: {Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 3 August 2013.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 5.
  • Drumul spre iad e pavat cu intenții bune.
    • English equivalent: The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Republica Populară Romînă, Republica Socialistă România (1981). Viața românească: revistăa Uniunii Scriitorilor din R.P.R.. Uniunea Scriitorilor. p. 54.
  • Dupâ ploie, vine soare.
    • English equivalent: After rain comes sunshine.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 7.
  • Exemplele rele strică moravurile bune.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 28. ISBN 1417964677.
  • Fă-mă, mamă, împărat, să mă mir ce m-a găsit.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 74. ISBN 1417964677.
  • Fă-mă, mamă, să-ți semăn.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 6. ISBN 1417964677.
  • Fieșicare cu gustul său.
    • English equivalent: There is no accounting for taste.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 1417964677.
  • Fii dupǎ cum te aratǎ chipul.
    • English equivalent: Handsome is that handsome does.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 39. ISBN 1417964677.
  • Finea bună, tote bune.
    • English equivalent: All is well that ends well.
    • “Problems and misfortunes along the way can be forgotten as long as the end is satisfactory.”
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 7.
  • Fructul nu cade departe de pom.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • “Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.”
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 488. ISBN 0415096243.
  • În țara orbilor, cel cu un ochi este împărat.
    • English equivalent: Among the blind, the one-eyed is king.
    • “People of only limited capability can succeed when surrounded by those who are even less able than themselves.”
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 143. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 2.
  • Lup în piele de oaie.
    • English equivalent: Beware of false prophets which come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly, they are ravening wolves.
    • “An innocent demeanor may hide much guilt.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 127. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 8. ISBN 1417964677.
  • Mai bine puțin cu dreptate decât mult cu strâmbǎtate.
    • English equivalent: Honesty is the best policy.
    • “Being honest or telling the truth is always the wisest course of action.”
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 128. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 42.
  • Mai multe muște cad în miere decât în oțet.
    • English equivalent: You can catch more flies with a drop of honey than with a barrel of vinegar.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 100.
  • Mǎrul nu cade departe de pom.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • “Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.”
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Māture fie-care la uşa sa.
    • English equivalent: Everyone should sweep before his own door.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 28.
  • Mincinosul cu de-a sila face musca cât cămila.
    • English equivalent: Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 58.
  • Nemultumitului i se ia darul!
    • English equivalent: Beggars can’t be choosers.
    • “We must accept with gratitude and without complaint what we are given when we do not have the means or opportunity to provide ourselves with something better.”
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 19. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 16.
  • Nimeni nu știe mai bine unde strânge cizma, decât cel ce o poartǎ.
    • English equivalent: No one knows where the shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
    • Meaning: “Nobody can fully understand another person’s hardship or suffering.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 289. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 4.
  • Nu facetĭ ce fac eu, ci cea ce vĕ spun eu.
    • English equivalent: Preachers say do as I say and not as I do.
    • “It bears no reason that the world should show greater love to me, than I have showed it.”
    • John Locke, Second Tract of Government (1662)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 21.
  • Nu da vrabia din mână pe cioara de pe gard.
    • English equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 4.
  • Nu iese fum fără foc.
    • English equivalent: There is no smoke without fire.
    • “There is no effect without some cause. or It is supposed that if there is a rumour, there must be some truth behind it.”
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). “1”. European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 33. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Bulzan. Itinerarii Traianee – Baetica Romana. Editura Mica Valahie. p. 158. ISBN 9737858522.
  • Nu lăsa pe mâine ce poți face azi.
    • English equivalent: Don’t leave for tomorrow what you can do today.
    • Salzer (2007). Lehrbuch der rumänischen Sprache. Buske Helmut Verlag GmbH. p. 191. ISBN 1.
  • Nu ațâța foc peste foc.
    • English equivalent: Don’t add fuel to the fire.
    • “One should not make a bad situation even worse by an improper remark.”
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 338. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Nu se aruncã mãrgãritarul porcilor.
    • English equivalent: Do not throw pearls before swine.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 22.
  • Nu vinde pielea ursului din pădure.
    • English equivalent: Don’t sell the skin till you have caught the bear.
    • Macrea, Lingvisticădin Bucureşti (1958). Dicţionarul limbii romîne moderne. Editura Academiei Republicii Populare Romîne. p. 961.
  • Nu te amesteca nepoftit în vorba altora.
    • English equivalent: Give neither salt nor counsel till you are asked for it.
    • “They say never give advice because a wise man doesn’t need it and a fool won’t heed it.”
    • David Stoess, Right Foot in the Pacific, Left Foot in the Atlantic (2000)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 60.
  • Ochii care nu se văd se uită.
    • English equivalent: Out of sight, out of mind.
    • Viata romineasca; revista literara si stiintifica. 1907. p. 438.
  • Ori te poartă cum ți-e vorba, ori vorbește cum ți-e portul.
    • English equivalent: Walk the talk.
    • “People who give me advice… I reckon they’re talking to themselves.”
    • Nic Pizzolatto, said by Detective Cohle in the television show True Detective (2014).
    • Păun, Mărdărescu (1969). Elogiu folclorului românesc:. Editura pentru Literatură. p. 8.
  • Pe o ureche intră și pe alta iese.
    • In at one ear and out at the other.
    • English equivalent: Advice most needed are the least heeded.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 179. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Puțin dai, puțin primești.
    • English equivalent: Sow thin, shear thin.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 95.
  • Rana dacă se deschide, anevoie se-nchide.
    • English equivalent: It is not wise to open old wounds.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 45.
  • Sare din lac în puț.
    • English equivalent: Out of the frying pan into the fire.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. X.
  • Scote ban din piatrǎ (seacă).
    • English equivalent: All is fish that comes to the net.
    • “Right it is to be taught even by the enemy.”
    • Ovid, Metamorphoses (8 AD)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 4.
  • Spǎrtura până e mică, trebuie cârpitǎ.
    • English equivalent: A stitch in time saves nine.
    • “No one needs to be told that a vast deal of labor is expended unnecessarily. This is occasioned, to a great extent, by the neglect of seasonable repairs.”
    • Source for meaning:Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order …. Munroe and Company. p. 13.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 6.
  • Spune’mi cu cine te-nsoțești, ca sǎ-țǐ spun cine ești.
    • English equivalent: A man is known by the company he keeps.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 5.
  • Totu lucru la vrema sa.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes, God disposes.
    • “Plans are insulted destinies. I don’t have plans, I only have goals.”
    • Ash Chandler, Freudian SlipMumbai Mirror Buzz, April 2006.
    • Caroline Ward (1842). National Proverbs in the Principal Languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 29.
  • Voia este în tine.
    • English equivalent: Where there is a will, there is a way.
    • “If you are sufficiently determined to achieve something, then you will find a way of doing so.”
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 299. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 95.

Romanian Proverbs

  • Să știi ca pe Tatăl Nostru – To know like the Lord’s Prayer
  • A-ți lua inima în dinți
    A băga mâna în foc pentru cineva – To put your hand in fire for somebody
  • Să faci din rahat bici
    I-a sărit muștarul – His mustard has jumped off
  • A dat cu mucii în fasole – He threw his boogers in the beans
  • A vinde gogoși – To sell doughnuts
  • A-ți pica fisa – To drop your coin
  • La Paștele Cailor – At horses’ Easter
  • A freca menta – To rub the mint
  • Te îmbeți cu apă rece – To get drunk with cold water
  • Freci menta – You are rubbing the mint: this is Romanians’ way of saying you are wasting time.

They also use another expression for this:

  • Tai frunza la caini – You are cutting leaves for the dogs. Both of them basically mean ‘doing nothing’.
  • Umbli cu cioara vopsita – You are walking around with the painted crow: This expression means you are trying to fool somebody, or that you are telling a lie.
  • A fi prins cu mata-n sac – To be caught with the cat in the bag: This is an expression used when trying to say that somebody was caught lying or cheating; similar to the expression ‘to be caught red handed’.
  • Am eu ac de cojocul tau – I have the needle for your coat: This a Romanian’s way of saying that he knows exactly what to do to get back at somebody, to take revenge.
  • Te duce cu presul – He carries you with the rug: This means that somebody is not being honest with you, he/she is trying to fool you.
  • A baga mana-n foc pentru cineva – To put your hand in the fire for somebody: This is the Romanian way to say that you vouch for somebody.
  • Mi-a picat fisa – My coin dropped: This is a Romanian’s way of saying that he finally got it, he finally understood something.
  • Mi-a picat fata – My face dropped: It’s an expression that might look like mi-a picat fisa, but it means a totally different thing. This is how a Romanian says that he was really surprised of something.
  • La Pastele cailor – At the horses’ Easter: This is an expression used when you want to say that something will happen very far in the future, or most likely never.
  • Ma scoti din pepeni – You take me out of the watermelons: When you hear a Romanian saying this, you might leave him/her alone, as this means he is getting really angry.
  • A vinde gogosi – Selling donuts: Donuts are a delicious dessert and selling them shouldn’t mean anything bad, right? Well, if a Romanian is telling you that you are selling donuts, this actually means they believe you are lying.
  • A te imbata cu apa rece – Getting drunk with cold water: This is Romanians’ way of saying that you are fooling yourself.
  • Esti dus cu pluta – You’re gone on a raft: It might sound like a nice outdoor activity to do, but when a Romanian uses this expression, he surely means something else. This means they believe you are crazy, that you’ve lost your mind.
  • A calca pe bec – To step on a light bulb: This is an expression used when trying to say that somebody has done a mistake or has broken a rule.
  • Vinzi castraveti gradinarului – You’re selling cucumbers to the gardener: This expression means you are trying to lie to somebody who knows the truth, or to explain something to somebody who already knows more about the issue.
  • Mi-a ajuns cutitul la os – The knife has reached my bone: A Romanian would say this when he can’t take it anymore, he’s reached a limit situation.
  • Te lupti cu morile de vant – You’re fighting with the windmills: This is Romanians’ way of saying that what you are doing is pointless, it will never get you anywhere.
  • A trece ca gasca prin apa – To cross like the goose through the water: This expression means that you’ve learned nothing from an experience, from something you did.
  • Ura si la gara! – Hurray and to the train station!: This is one funny and strange way of saying: enough!

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