Virtue is moral excellence. A virtue is a trait or quality that is deemed to be morally good and thus is valued as a foundation of principle and good moral being. Personal virtues are characteristics valued as promoting collective and individual greatness.

Virtue is when people realize their own limitedness, and let go of their pettiness in the infinity of the universe.

Painting with scenes from The Twenty-four Cases of Filial Piety. Kano Motonobu, 1550

Filial Piety

Filial Piety In Confucian, Chinese Buddhist and Taoist ethics, filial piety (孝, xiào) is a virtue of respect for one’s parents, elders, and ancestors. The Confucian Classic of Filial Piety, thought to be written around the Qin–Han period, has historically been the authoritative source on the Confucian tenet of filial piety. The book, a purported dialogue between Confucius and his student...

Three Treasures

Three Treasures

Three Treasures (Taoism) The Three Treasures or Three Jewels (三寶; sānbǎo; Wade–Giles: san-pao) are basic virtues in Taoism. Although the Tao Te Ching originally used sanbao to mean “compassion“, “frugality“, and “humility“, the term was later used to translate the Three Jewels (Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha) in Chinese Buddhism, and to mean the Three Treasures (jing, qi, and shen) in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Tao Te Ching Sanbao “three treasures” first occurs...

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Three Obediences and Four Virtues

Three Obediences and Four Virtues The Three Obediences and Four Virtues (三从四德; Sāncóng Sìdé) are the most basic set of moral principles and social code of behaviour for maidens and married women in East Asian Confucianism especially in Ancient and Imperial China. Even Chinese prostitutes in Ancient China followed this code to be defined as feminine. Some imperial eunuchs and modern gay men are also heavily influenced by...

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Dignity

Dignity Dignity is the right of a person to be valued and respected for their own sake, and to be treated ethically. It is of significance in morality, ethics, law and politics as an extension of the Enlightenment-era concepts of inherent, inalienable rights. The term may also be used to describe personal conduct, as in “behaving with dignity“. Etymology The English...

Folk ritual masters conducting a ceremony.

De (Chinese)

De (Chinese) De (Chinese: 德), also written as Te, is a key concept in Chinese philosophy, usually translated “inherent character; inner power; integrity” in Taoism, “moral character; virtue; morality” in Confucianism and other contexts, and “quality; virtue” (guna) or “merit; virtuous deeds” (punya) in Chinese Buddhism. The word Chinese de 德 is an ancient and linguistically complex word. The...

Bioethics

Bioethics The term bioethics was first coined by American biochemist Van Rensselaer Potter to describe a new philosophy that integrates biology, ecology, medicine, and human values. In the broader sense of the term, bioethics encompasses both biomedical ethics, dealing with questions of ethics related to medicine, and environmental ethics, dealing with ecological ethics, such as respect for...

Golden Rule

Golden Rule The Golden Rule is the principle of treating others as you want to be treated. It is a maxim that is found in many religions and cultures. It can be considered an ethic of reciprocity in some religions, although different religions treat it differently. The maxim may appear as a positive or negative...

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Asceticism (Judaism)

Asceticism Main article: Asceticism A term derived from the Greek verb ἀσκέω, meaning “to practise strenuously,” “to exercise.” Athletes were therefore said to go through ascetic training, and to be ascetics. In this usage the twofold application—to the mode of living and the results attained—which marks the later theological implication...

Asceticism (Jewish)

Asceticism Rigorous abstention from any form of self-indulgence which is based on the belief that renunciation of the desires of the flesh and self-mortification can bring man to a high spiritual state. Asceticism never occupied an important place in the Jewish religion. Judaism did not believe that the freedom of man’s soul could be...

Happiness at Work

Happiness at Work Despite a large body of positive psychological research into the relationship between happiness and productivity, happiness at work has traditionally been seen as a potential by-product of positive outcomes at work, rather than a pathway to business success. During the past two decades, maintaining a level of happiness...

Happiness and Religion

Happiness and Religion The relationship between religion and happiness has been the focus of much research. The present review provides a critical examination of this research and, in particular, focuses on conceptual and methodological concerns. The majority of studies report a positive association between measures of religion and happiness; however,...

Diligence

Diligence Diligence is one of the seven heavenly virtues. Diligent behavior is indicative of a work ethic – a belief that work is good in itself. Diligence is carefulness and persistent effort or work. See also: The seven heavenly virtues, Virtue In students Bernard et al. suggest diligence in a student is defined...

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Dharma in Jainism

Dharma in Jainism Jain texts assign a wide range of meaning to the Sanskrit dharma or Prakrit dhamma. It is often translated as “religion” and as such, Jainism is called Jain Dharma by its adherents. In Jainism, the word Dharma is used to refer the following: Religion Dharmastikaay as a dravya (substance or a...

Aparigraha

Aparigraha In Hinduism and Jainism, aparigraha (अपरिग्रह) is the virtue of non-possessiveness, non-grasping or non-greediness. Aparigrah is the opposite of parigrah, and refers to keeping the desire for possessions to what is necessary or important, depending on one’s life stage and context. The precept of aparigraha is a self-restraint (temperance) from the type of greed and avarice where one’s own...

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The Transformation Of Consciousness Into Wisdom

The Transformation Of Consciousness Into Wisdom In The Chinese Consciousness-Only School of Buddhism According To The Cheng Wei-Shi Lun INTRODUCTION In the Chinese Consciousness-Only School of Buddhism, Buddhahood, characterized by the perfectly enlightened mind of True Suchness (bhutatathata) is understood as the final realization of a systematic and gradual path....

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Consciousness – Joseph S. Benner

Consciousness Joseph S. Benner – Sun Paper 33 – September 1931 In the August Paper we tried to prepare you for a suggestion — a request that we wanted to make of you, and which we intimated would prove rather startling. This would be so only to those who have...

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Self-efficacy

What Is Self-efficacy? Self-efficacy is an individual’s belief in their innate ability to achieve goals. Albert Bandura defines it as a personal judgement of “how well one can execute courses of action required to deal with prospective situations”.[1] Expectations of self-efficacy determine whether an individual will be able to exhibit coping behavior and how...

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Mind–body Dualism

Mind–Body Dualism The Mind–body dualism, or mind–body duality, is a view in the philosophy of mind that mental phenomena are, in some respects, non-physical,[1] or that the mind and body are distinct and separable.[2] Thus, it encompasses a set of views about the relationship between mind and matter, and between subject and object, and is contrasted with other positions, such as physicalism and enactivism, in...

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Mind–body Problem

Mind–body Problem The mind–body problem is a philosophical problem concerning the relationship between thought and consciousness in the human mind and the brain as part of the physical body. It is distinct from the question of how mind and body function chemically and physiologically since that question presupposes an interactionist...

Tolstoy On The Law of Love

Tolstoy On The Law of Love A Christian does not quarrel with any one, does not attack any one, nor use violence against one; on the contrary, he himself without murmuring bears violence; but by this very relation to violence he not only frees himself, but also the world from...

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