Buddhism is an Indian religion and encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies.

Buddhism is a path of practice and spiritual development leading to Insight into the true nature of reality. 

Zen

What is Zen? Zen (禪; Chán, 선) is a school of Mahayana Buddhism that originated in China during the Tang dynasty as Chan Buddhism. It was strongly influenced by Taoism and developed as a distinct school of Chinese Buddhism. From China, Chan Buddhism spread south to Vietnam which became Vietnamese Thiền, northeast to Korea and east to Japan, where it became known as Seon Buddhism and Japanese Zen, respectively.[1] The...

Buddhist Meditation

What Is Buddhist Meditation? Buddhist meditation is the practice of meditation in Buddhism. The closest words for meditation in the classical languages of Buddhism are bhāvanā (“mental development”) and jhāna/dhyāna (mental training resulting in a calm and luminous mind). Buddhists pursue meditation as part of the path toward liberation, awakening and Nirvana, and includes...

Samsara in Buddhism

Samsara in Buddhism Saṃsāra (samsara) in Buddhism is the beginningless cycle of repeated birth, mundane existence and dying again.[1] Samsara is considered to be dukkha, unsatisfactory and painful,[2] perpetuated by desire and avidya (ignorance), and the resulting karma.[3][4][5] Rebirths occur in six realms of existence, namely three good realms (heavenly, demi-god, human) and three evil realms (animal, ghosts, hellish)....

Creator in Buddhism

Creator in Buddhism Buddhist thought consistently rejects the notion of a creator deity.[1][2] It teaches the concept of gods, heavens and rebirths in its Saṃsāra doctrine, but it considers none of these gods as a creator. Buddhism posits that mundane deities such as Mahabrahma are misconstrued to be a creator.[3] Buddhist ontology follows...

Fasting in Buddhism

Fasting in Buddhism In Buddhism, there are a variety of attitudes towards different forms of Fasting. The Buddha is known to have practiced extreme forms of fasting which led to his emaciation and to have famously abandoned it before his great awakening. Nevertheless, different forms of fasting are practiced in various Buddhist traditions....

Buddha India Spirit Prayer Concept Buddhist

Enlightenment in Buddhism

Enlightenment in Buddhism The English term enlightenment is the western translation of the abstract noun bodhi, (बोधि), the knowledge or wisdom, or awakened intellect, of a Buddha.[1] The verbal root budh- means “to awaken,” and its literal meaning is closer to “awakening.” Although its most common usage is in the context of Buddhism, the term buddhi is also used...

Nirvana in Buddhism

Nirvana (Buddhism) Nirvana (निर्वाण, nirvāṇa; nibbana, nibbāna) is the earliest and most common term used to describe the goal of the Buddhist path.[1] The literal meaning is “blowing out” or “quenching.”[2] It is the ultimate spiritual goal in Buddhism and marks the soteriological release from rebirths in saṃsāra.[1][3] Nirvana is part of the Third Truth on “cessation...

Nirvana

What is Nirvana? This article is about the Pali and Sanskrit term which refers to the concept.  Nirvāṇa ([1] निर्वाण nirvāṇa; निब्बान nibbāna; णिव्वाण ṇivvāṇa, literally “blown out”, as in an oil lamp[2]) is commonly associated with Jainism and Buddhism, and represents its ultimate state of soteriological release, the liberation from repeated rebirth in saṃsāra.[3][web 1][4] In Indian...

Buddhist Devotion

Buddhist Devotion

Buddhist Devotion Most Buddhists use ritual in pursuit of their spiritual aspirations. Common devotional practices are receiving a blessing, making merit, making a resolution, prostrating, making offerings, chanting traditional texts and pilgrimage. Moreover, many types of visualizations, recollections and mantras are used in Buddhist meditation in different traditions to devote oneself to a Buddha or a teacher. The often...

Vinaya: Confession in Buddhism

Vinaya: Confession in Buddhism Extant vinaya texts include those of the Theravada (the only one in Pali), the Kāśyapīya, the Mahāsāṃghika, the Mahīśāsaka, the Dharmaguptaka, the Sarvāstivāda and the Mūlasarvāstivāda.[1]The Vinaya (Pali and Sanskrit, literally meaning “leading out”, “education”, “discipline”) is the regulatory framework for the sangha or monastic community of Buddhism based on the canonical texts called the Vinaya Pitaka. The teachings of the Gautama Buddha can be...

Buddha

Ātman In Buddhism

Ātman (Buddhism) Most Buddhist traditions and texts reject the premise of a permanent, unchanging atman (self, soul).[2][3] However, some Buddhist schools, sutras and tantras present the notion of an atman or permanent “Self”, although mostly referring to an Absolute and not to a personal self.Ātman (/ˈɑːtmən/), attā or attan in Buddhism is the concept of self, and is found in Buddhist literature’s discussion of...

Ghosts In Tibetan Culture

Ghosts In Tibetan Culture There is widespread belief in ghosts in Tibetan culture. Ghosts are explicitly recognized in the Tibetan Buddhist religion as they were in Indian Buddhism,[1] occupying a distinct but overlapping world to the human one, and feature in many traditional legends. When a human dies, after a period of...

Japanese Buddhist Pantheon

Japanese Buddhist Pantheon The Japanese Buddhist Pantheon designates the multitude (the Pantheon) of various Buddhas, Bodhisattvas and lesser deities and eminent religious masters in Buddhism. A Buddhist Pantheon exists to a certain extent in Mahāyāna, but is especially characteristic of Vajrayana Esoteric Buddhism, including Tibetan Buddhism and especially Japanese Shingon Buddhism,...

Anantarika-karma

Anantarika-karma Ānantarika-karma or ānantarika-kamma is a heinous crime that through karmic process brings immediate disaster.[1][2] They are called ‘anantarika’ because they are ‘an’ (without) ‘antara’ (interval), in other words the results immediately come to fruition in the next life, i.e. the participant goes straight to hell. These are considered so heinous that Buddhists and non-Buddhists must...

Buddhism

What Is Buddhism?

Buddhism Buddhism encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism is a path of practice and spiritual development leading to Insight into the true nature of reality.  Most Buddhist traditions share the goal of overcoming suffering and the cycle...

Dāna

Dāna Dāna (दान) is a Sanskrit and Pali word that connotes the virtue of generosity, charity or giving of alms in Indian philosophies.[1][2] It is alternatively transliterated as daana.[3][4] In Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, dāna is the practice of cultivating generosity. It can take the form of giving to an individual in distress or need.[5] It can...

Buddhist Views On Sin

Buddhist Views On Sin There are a few differing Buddhist views on sin. American Zen author Brad Warner states that in Buddhism there is no concept of sin at all.[1][2] The Buddha Dharma Education Association also expressly states “The idea of sin or original sin has no place in Buddhism.”[3] Zen student and author Barbara O’Brien has said that...

Tripitaka

What Is Tripitaka? Tripiṭaka (Tipiṭaka) is the traditional term for the Buddhist scriptures.[1][2] The version canonical to Theravada Buddhism is generally referred to in English as the Pali Canon. Mahayana Buddhism also holds the Tripiṭaka to be authoritative but, unlike Theravadins, it also includes in its canon various derivative literature and commentaries that were...

Vinaya

What Is Vinaya? The Vinaya (Pali and Sanskrit, literally meaning “leading out”, “education”, “discipline”) is the regulatory framework for the sangha or monastic community of Buddhism based on the canonical texts called the Vinaya Pitaka. The teachings of the Gautama Buddha can be divided into two broad categories: Dharma “doctrine” and Vinaya “discipline”. Extant vinaya texts include those of the Theravada (the...

Vimalakirti Sutra

Vimalakirti Sutra The Vimalakīrti Nirdeśa (विमलकीर्तिनिर्देश), or (the Vimalakīrti Sūtra or Vimalakīrti Nirdeśa Sūtra) is a Mahayana Buddhist sutra. It was extremely influential in East Asia, but most likely of considerably less importance in the Indian and Tibetan sub-traditions of Mahāyāna Buddhism. The word nirdeśa in the title means “instruction, advice”, and Vimalakīrti is the name of the...

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