Middle Eastern Religions

Middle Eastern religions originated in the Middle East; namely Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and Iranic religions. Smaller minority religions, such as the Bahá’í Faith, Druze, Nusairism, Manichaeism, Sabianism, Bábism, Yazidism, Mandaeism, Gnosticism, Yarsanism, Samaritanism, Shabakism, Ishikism, Ali-Illahism, Alevism, Yazdânism and Zoroastrianism are also present in the Middle East.

 

The smaller, religiously unaffiliated population is forecast to grow 56%, from about 2 million to more than 3 million. Hindus, adherents of folk religions and Buddhists are expected to experience the greatest growth as a percentage of their modest 2010 counts, with each group more than doubling in size by 2050.

 

Christianity

Faith in Christianity

Jesus

The Trinity

Mary, Mother of Jesus

The Bible

Christian practices

Branches of Christianity

Eastern Christianity (more)

Western Christianity

Protestantism (more)

Protestant denominations

Catholicism (more)

Nontrinitarianism (more)

Traditional Christian groups
Modern Christian groups

Islam

Islamic Faith

(iman)(Six articles of faith):

  1. Existence and unicity of God (Allah).
  2. Existence of Angels
  3. Existence of the books of which God is the author
  4. Existence of Prophets
  5. Existence of the Day of Judgment Day
  6. Existence of God’s predestination

The Holy Quran

Muhammad

Worship and prayers

Islamic schools and branches

Sunni Islam

Shia Islam

Sufism

 
Star Of David Menorah Hebrew Judaism

Star Of David Menorah Hebrew Judaism

Judaism

Beliefs and philosophy

Judaism practices

Judaism’s Religious Texts

Branches and denominations

Jewish Ethnic Divisions
Jewish Religious Movements

Development of Rabbinic Judaism

Origins of Rabbinic Judaism,
Origins of Christianity,
Split of early Christianity and Judaism

Historical Judaism

Rabbinic Judaism

Iranian Religions

Zoroastrianism

Rastafari

Black Hebrew Israelites

See also

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