An angel is generally a supernatural being found in various religions and mythologies. In Abrahamic religions and Zoroastrianism, angels are often depicted as benevolent celestial beings who act as intermediaries between God or Heaven and humanity. Other roles of angels include protecting and guiding human beings, and carrying out God’s tasks.

The Angel Lailah

Lailah The angel Lailah or Laylah (Heb. לַיְלָה) is an angel in some interpretations in the Talmud and in some later Jewish mythology. Etymology The name Lailah is the same as the Hebrew word for “night” laylah לילה. The identification of the word “night” as the name of an angel originates with the interpretation of “Rabbi Yochanan” (possibly Yochanan ben Zakkai c. 30 – 90...

Classes of Angels

Classes of angels: There are angels representing in the inner dimension of existence species of earthly creatures and supervising them Some animals, like honeybees, for example, act under Divine inspiration, although science asserts that all animals are directed by impulses. Science is unable to explain what an impulse is and...

Buraq

Buraq Al-Burāq (Arabic: البُراق‎ al-Burāq “lightning”) is a magical equid in Islamic mythology: a creature from the heavens that transported the prophets. Most notably hadith literature recounts that Buraq carried the Islamic prophet Muhammad from Mecca to Jerusalem and back during the Isra and Mi’raj or ‘Night Journey’.[1] Etymology The Encyclopaedia of Islam, referring to Al-Damiri’s writings, considers Buraq to be a derivative of Arabic: برق‎ barq “lightning”.[2] According to Encyclopædia Iranica, “Boraq” is the Arabized form...

Archangel Azrael

Archangel Azrael Azrael (Biblical Hebrew: עזראל‎) is an angel in the Abrahamic religions. He is often identified with the Angel of Destruction and Renewal of the Hebrew Bible.[1]:64–65 The Hebrew name translates to “Angel of God”, “Help from God”, or “One Whom God Helps”.[1]:64–65 Azrael is the spelling of the Chambers Dictionary. The Qur’an refers to Azrael as Malak al-Mawt (ملك الموت)...

Fallen Angel

Fallen Angel In Abrahamic religions, fallen angels are angels who were expelled from Heaven. The term “fallen angel” appears neither in the Bible nor in other Abrahamic scriptures, but is used of angels who were cast out of heaven[1]or angels who sinned. Such angels are often malevolent towards humanity. The idea of fallen angels derived from Jewish Enochic pseudepigraphy or the assumption...

Archangel Gabriel

Archangel Gabriel Gabriel (Hebrew: גַּבְרִיאֵל‎,’Gavri’el “God is my strength”‘, Ancient Greek: Γαβριήλ,’Gabriel’, Aramaic: ܓܒܪܝܝܠ‎, Arabic: جبريل, Jibrīl or جبرائيل Jibrāʾīl), in the Abrahamic religions, is an archangel. He was first described in the Hebrew Bible and was subsequently developed by other traditions. In the Hebrew Bible, Gabriel appears to the prophet Daniel, to explain his visions (Daniel 8:15–26, 9:21–27). Gabriel the archangel is also a character in other...

Archangel Israfil

Archangel Israfil Israfil (Arabic: إِسْـرَافِـيْـل‎.Isrāfīl, alternate spellings: Israfel, Esrafil)[1] is the angel who blows into the trumpet before Armageddon and sometimes depicted as the angel of music.[2][3] Though unnamed in the Quran, he is one of the four Islamic archangels, the others being long with Mikhail, Jibrail and Azrael.[1] It is believed that Israfil will blow the trumpet from a holy rock in Jerusalem to announce the...

Archangel Raphael

Archangel Raphael Medieval French rabbi, author and Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) commentator Rashi views Raphael as being one of the three angels that appeared to Abraham in the oak grove of Mamre in the Book of Genesis. Raphael is also mentioned in the Book of Enoch alongside archangels Michael, Gabriel and Uriel. Raphael (Hebrew: רָפָאֵל‬, Rāfāʾēl, lit. ‘It is God who heals’, ‘God Heals’, ‘God, Please Heal’; Ancient Greek: Ραφαήλ, Arabic: رفائيل‎ or إسرافيل) is an archangel in Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Raphael performs all manners...

Angel Moroni

Angel Moroni Moroni is thought by Latter Day Saints to be the same person as a Book of Mormon prophet-warrior named Moroni, who was the last to write in the golden plates. The book states that Moroni buried them before he died after a great battle between two pre-Columbian civilizations. After he died, he became...

List Of Angels In Theology

List Of Angels In Theology This is a list of angels in theology, including both specific angels (e.g. Gabriel) and types of angels (e.g. Seraphim). Note that some overlap is to be expected with the list of theological demons entry, since various traditions have different classifications for the spirits they...

Seven Archangels

Seven Archangels The concept of Seven Archangels is found in some works of early Jewish literature. Bible The term archangel itself is not found in equivalent in the Hebrew Bible, and in the Greek New Testament the term archangel only occurs in 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and the Epistle of Jude 1:9, where it is used of Michael, who in Daniel10:13 is called ‘one of...

Hierarchy of Angels

Hierarchy of Angels A hierarchy of angels is a belief or tradition found in the angelology of different religions, which holds that there are different levels or ranks of angels. Higher ranks may be asserted to have greater power or authority over lower ranks, and with different ranks having differences in appearance,...

Amesha Spenta

Amesha Spenta In Zoroastrianism, Amesha Spenta (Avestan) is a class of divine entities literally means “Immortal (which is) holy.”[1][n 1] Later Middle Persian variations of the term include the contraction ‘Ameshaspand’ as well as the specifically Zoroastrian ‘Mahraspand’ and ‘Amahraspand’. As the great “divine sparks”  Significantly more common than the non-specific meaning of Amesha Spenta (see below) is a...

Angels in Zoroastrianism

Angels in Zoroastrianism Zoroastrianism recognizes various classes of spiritual beings besides the Supreme Being (Ahura Mazda): The Amesha Spentas, Yazatas, and Fravashis. In practice (cf. Sad Dar, chapter 26), Zoroastrians pick a patron angel for their protection, and throughout their lives are careful to observe prayers dedicated to that angel. See...

Yazata

What Is Yazata? Yazata (Avestan) is the Avestan language word for a Zoroastrian concept with a wide range of meanings but generally signifying (or used as an epithet of) a divinity. The term literally means “worthy of worship or veneration”,[1][2] and is thus, in this more general sense, also applied to certain healing plants, primordial creatures,...

Cherub

Cherub or Cherubim A cherub (plural cherubim; Hebrew: כְּרוּב‎ kərūv, pl. כְּרוּבִים kərūvîm) is one of the unearthly beings who directly attend to God according to Abrahamic religions. The numerous depictions of cherubim assign to them many different roles; their original duty having been the protection of the Garden of Eden.[2] In Jewish angelic hierarchy, cherubim have the ninth (second-lowest) rank in Maimonides’ Mishneh...

Seraph

Seraph or Seraphim A seraph (“the burning one”; seraphs or seraphim, in the King James Version also seraphims (plural); Hebrew: שָׂרָף śārāf, plural שְׂרָפִים śərāfîm; Latin: seraphim and seraphin (plural), also seraphus (-i, m.);[1]Greek: σεραφείμ serapheím Arabic: مشرفين Musharifin[2]) is a Hebrew-origin word referring to a type of celestial or heavenly being originating in Ancient Judaism. The term plays a role in subsequent Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.[3] The singular “seraph” is a back-formation from the Hebrew plural-form “seraphim”, whereas in Hebrew...

Christian Angelology

Christian Angelology In Christianity, angels are agents of God, based on angels in Judaism.[1] The most influential Christian angelic hierarchy was that put forward by Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite in the 4th or 5th century in his book De Coelesti Hierarchia (On the Celestial Hierarchy). During the Middle Ages, many schemes were proposed about the hierarchy of demons, some drawing on...

Saint Michael in the Catholic Church

Saint Michael in the Catholic Church Saint Michael the Archangel is referenced in the Old Testament and has been part of Christian teachings since the earliest times.[1] In Catholic writings and traditions he acts as the defender of the Church, and chief opponent of Satan; and assists souls at the hour of death. A widely used “Prayer...

Archangel Michael

Michael Saint Michael the Archangel (Hebrew: Mîkhā’ēl, ‘Who is like God?’; Greek: Mikhaḗl; Latin: Michahel; Coptic: Arabic: Mīkhā’īl) is an archangel in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran traditions, he is called “Saint Michael the Archangel” and “Saint Michael”. In the Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Orthodox religions, he is called “Saint Michael the Taxiarch”.[7][8] Archangel Michael is mentioned three times in the Book of Daniel. The idea that Michael was...

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