Anne Frank Quotes

Annelies Marie Frank (12 June 1929 – February/March 1945) was a young German-born Jewish diarist and aspiring writer, who died of typhus in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.

Anne Frank

How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world. – Anne Frank

In spite of everything, I still believe that people are really good at heart. – Anne Frank

Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy. – Anne Frank

No one has ever become poor by giving. – Anne Frank

Parents can only give good advice or put them on the right paths, but the final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands. – Anne Frank

The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature and God. – Anne Frank

I don’t think of all the misery, but of the beauty that still remains. – Anne Frank

People can tell you to keep your mouth shut, but that doesn’t stop you from having your own opinion. – Anne Frank

In the long run, the sharpest weapon of all is a kind and gentle spirit. – Anne Frank

Where there’s hope, there’s life. It fills us with fresh courage and makes us strong again. – Anne Frank

Whoever is happy will make others happy. – Anne Frank

Human greatness does not lie in wealth or power, but in character and goodness. – Anne Frank

As long as this exists, this sunshine and this cloudless sky, and as long as I can enjoy it, how can I be sad? – Anne Frank

There’s only one rule you need to remember: laugh at everything and forget everybody else! It sound egotistical, but it’s actually the only cure for those suffering from self-pity. – Anne Frank

Anne Frank Quotes

Those who have courage and faith shall never perish in misery. – Anne Frank

The good news is that you don’t know how great you can be! How much you can love! What you can accomplish! And what your potential is!

Dead people receive more flowers than the living ones because regret is stronger than gratitude. – Anne Frank

Sympathy, love, fortune… We all have these qualities but still tend to not use them! – Anne Frank

I can’t imagine how anyone can say: ‘I’m weak’, and then remain so. After all, if you know it, why not fight against it, why not try to train your character? – Anne Frank

I think it’s odd that grown-ups quarrel so easily and so often and about such petty matters. Up to now I always thought bickering was just something children did and that they outgrew it. – Anne Frank

An empty day, though clear and bright, is just as dark as any night. – Anne Frank

The young are not afraid of telling the truth. – Anne Frank

Whoever doesn’t know it must learn and find by experience that ‘a quiet conscience makes one strong!’ – Anne Frank

I must uphold my ideals, for perhaps the time will come when I shall be able to carry them out. – Anne Frank

We all live with the objective of being happy; our lives are all different and yet the same. – Anne Frank

Writing in a diary is a really strange experience for someone like me. Not only because I’ve never written anything before, but also because it seems to me that later on neither I nor anyone else will be interested in the musings of a thirteen-year old school girl. Oh well, it doesn’t matter. I feel like writing. – Anne Frank

How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world. – Anne Frank

I know what I want, I have a goal, an opinion, I have a religion and love. Let me be myself and then I am satisfied. I know that I’m a woman, a woman with inward strength and plenty of courage. – Anne Frank

We aren’t allowed to have any opinions. People can tell you to keep your mouth shut, but it doesn’t stop you having your own opinion. Even if people are still very young, they shouldn’t be prevented from saying what they think. – Anne Frank

Women should be respected as well! Generally speaking, men are held in great esteem in all parts of the world, so why shouldn’t women have their share? Soldiers and war heroes are honored and commemorated, explorers are granted immortal fame, martyrs are revered, but how many people look upon women too as soldiers? – Anne Frank

Everyone has inside of him a piece of good news. The good news is that you don’t know how great you can be! How much you can love! What you can accomplish! And what your potential is! – Anne Frank

It’s difficult in times like these: ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart. – Anne Frank

What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again. – Anne Frank

I don’t think of all the misery but of the beauty that still remains. – Anne Frank

Whoever is happy will make others happy too. – Anne Frank

It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart. – Anne Frank

Anne Frank Quotes

The Diary of a Young Girl (1942 – 1944)

Composed from her 13th birthday on 12 June 1942, until 1 August 1944, just prior to her family’s capture.
I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that this cruelty too shall end, and that peace & tranquility will return once again.
  • For someone like me, it is a very strange habit to write in a diary. Not only that I have never written before, but it strikes me that later neither I, nor anyone else, will care for the musings of a thirteen-year-old schoolgirl.
    • 20 June 1942
  • However, during the third class he’d finally had enough. “Anne Frank, as punishment for talking in class, write an essay entitled, Quack, Quack, Quack, Said Mistress Chatterback.”
    • Writing a story about a teacher who is scolding her for being talkative in class. Variant translations: Quack, Quack, Quack, Said Miss Quackenbush. / Quack, Quack, Quack, Said Miss Natterbeak.
    • 21 June 1942
  • I’ve learned one thing: you only really get to know a person after a fight. Only then can you judge their true character!
    • Variant translation: The only way to truly know a person is to argue with them. For when they argue in full swing, then they reveal their true character.
    • 28 September 1942
  • Fine specimens of humanity, those Germans, and to think that I am actually one of them!
    • 9 October 1942
  • If I read a book that impresses me, I have to take myself firmly by the hand, before I mix with other people; otherwise they would think my mind rather queer.
    • 8 November 1943
  • You can be lonely even when you’re loved by many people, since you’re still not anybody’s “one and only”.
    • 29 December 1943
  • I soothe my conscience now with the thought that it is better for hard words to be on paper than that Mummy should carry them in her heart.
    • 2 January 1944
  • Who would ever think that so much went on in the soul of a young girl?
    • 12 January 1944
  • I trust to luck and do nothing but work, hoping that all will end well.
    • 3 February 1944
  • The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quiet, alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature. As long as this exists, and it certainly always will, I know that then there will always be comfort for every sorrow, whatever the circumstances may be. And I firmly believe that nature brings solace in all troubles.
    • 23 February 1944
  • People can tell you to keep your mouth shut, but it doesn’t stop you having your own opinions. Even if people are still very young, they shouldn’t be prevented from saying what they think.
    • 2 March 1944
  • At such moments I don’t think about all the misery, but about the beauty that still remains. This is where Mother and I differ greatly. Her advice in the face of melancholy is: “Think about all the suffering in the world and be thankful you’re not part of it.” My advice is: “Go outside, to the country, enjoy the sun and all nature has to offer. Go outside and try to recapture the happiness within yourself; think of all the beauty in yourself and in everything around you and be happy.”
    • 7 March 1944
    • Variant translations:
Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.
Think of all the beauty that is still left in and around you and be happy!
  • A “food cycle” is a period in which we have only one particular dish or type of vegetable to eat. For a long time we ate nothing but endive. Endive with sand -, endive without sand, endive with mashed potatoes, endive-and-mashed potato casserole. Then it was spinach, followed by kohlrabi, salsify, cucumbers, tomatoes, sauerkraut, etc., etc.
    • 3 April 1944
  • I need to have something besides a husband and children to devote myself to! I don’t want to have lived in vain like most people. I want to be useful or bring enjoyment to all people, even those I’ve never met.
    • 5 April 1944
  • I want to go on living even after my death! And that’s why I’m so grateful to God for having given me this gift, which I can use to develop myself and to express all that’s inside me!
    • 5 April 1944
  • Be brave! Let’s remember our duty and perform it without complaint. There will be a way out. God has never deserted our people. Through the ages Jews have had to suffer, but through the ages they’ve gone on living, and the centuries of suffering have only made them stronger. The weak shall fall and the strong shall survive and not be defeated!
    • 11 April 1944
  • I don’t believe that the big men, the politicians and the capitalists alone are guilty of the war. Oh, no, the little man is just as keen, otherwise the people of the world would have risen in revolt long ago! There is an urge and rage in people to destroy, to kill, to murder, and until all mankind, without exception, undergoes a great change, wars will be waged, everything that has been built up, cultivated and grown, will be destroyed and disfigured, after which mankind will have to begin all over again.
    • 3 May 1944
  • I have often been downcast, but never in despair; I regard our hiding as a dangerous adventure, romantic and interesting at the same time. In my diary I treat all the privations as amusing. I have made up my mind now to lead a different life from other girls and, later on, different from ordinary housewives. My start has been so very full of interest, and that is the sole reason why I have to laugh at the humorous side of the most dangerous moments.
    • 3 May 1944
  • I’ve found that there is always some beauty left — in nature, sunshine, freedom, in yourself; these can all help you. Look at these things, then you find yourself again, and God, and then you regain your balance. A person who’s happy will make others happy; a person who has courage and faith will never die in misery!
    • 7 May 1944
  • Is discord going to show itself while we are still fighting, is the Jew once again worth less than another? Oh, it is sad, very sad, that once more, for the umpteenth time, the old truth is confirmed: “What one Christian does is his own responsibility, what one Jew does is thrown back at all Jews.”
    • 22 May 1944
  • I believe that in the course of the next century the notion that it’s a woman’s duty to have children will change and make way for the respect and admiration of all women, who bear their burdens without complaint or a lot of pompous words!
    • 13 June 1944
  • Laziness may look inviting, but only work gives you true satisfaction.
    • Variant translation: Laziness may appear attractive but work gives satisfaction.
    • 6 July 1944
  • We’re all alive, but we don’t know why or what for; we’re all searching for happiness; we’re all leading lives that are different and yet the same.
    • 6 July 1944
    • Variant translation: We all live with the objective of being happy, our lives are all different and yet the same.
  • It’s difficult in times like these: ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart. It’s utterly impossible for me to build my life on a foundation of chaos, suffering and death. I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquility will return once more. In the meantime, I must hold on to my ideals. Perhaps the day will come when I’ll be able to realize them!
    • 15 July 1944; Variant translations:
    • It’s really a wonder that I haven’t dropped all my ideals, because they seem so absurd and impossible to carry out. Yet I keep them, because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.
    • I keep my ideals, because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart.
    • I simply can’t build my hopes on a foundation of confusion, misery, and death…and yet…I think…this cruelty will end, and that peace and tranquility will return again.
  • Parents can only give good advice or put them on the right paths, but the final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands.
    • 15 July 1944
  • Forgive me, Kitty, they don’t call me a bundle of contradictions for nothing!
    • 21 July 1944

      Anne Frank Quotes About The Holocaust and Quotes Of Anne Frank

About The Diary of a Young Girl

  • Gail Horalek, the mother of a 7th-grade child in Michigan in the US, has made international headlines by complaining that the unabridged version of Anne Frank’s diary is pornographic and should not be taught at her daughter’s school. At issue for Horalek is a section detailing Anne’s exploration of her own genitalia, material originally omitted by Anne’s father, Otto Frank, when he prepared the manuscript for publication in the late 40s 
    I had to look up what age kids are in the 7th grade. They’re 12 to 13! They’re only about a year younger than Anne was when she wrote of her vagina: “There are little folds of skin all over the place, you can hardly find it. The little hole underneath is so terribly small that I simply can’t imagine how a man can get in there, let alone how a whole baby can get out!” There cannot be a 13-year-old girl on the planet who hasn’t had a root around and arrived at this exact stage of bafflement.
  • Horalek is, of course, wrong to call the passages pornographic. Pornography is material intended to arouse sexual excitement, and I very much doubt that was Anne’s intention when she wrote to her imaginary confidant Kitty about her journeys of self-discovery.
  • Anne is going through puberty, and she describes her changed vagina in honest detail, saying, “until I was 11 or 12, I didn’t realise there was a second set of labia on the inside, since you couldn’t see them. What’s even funnier is that I thought urine came out of the clitoris.” (Oh Anne, we’ve all been there.) She continues: “In the upper part, between the outer labia, there’s a fold of skin that, on second thought, looks like a kind of blister. That’s the clitoris.” It’s beautiful, visceral writing, and it’s describing something that most young women experience. 
    And yet I can understand that the junior Ms Horalek would have squirmed and wished herself elsewhere when this was read in class. We live in a society in which young women are taught to be ashamed of the changes that their bodies undergo at puberty – to be secretive about them, and even to pretend that they don’t exist. Breasts, the minute they bud, are strapped into harnesses, and the nipples disguised from view. Period paraphernalia must be discreet, with advertisers routinely boasting that their tampons look enough like sweets to circumvent the social horror of discovery. 
    For my generation, removal of post-pubescent hair on the legs and underarms was mandatory. For Ms Horalek’s generation, it is mandatory for pubic hair too. Anne writes: “When you’re standing up, all you see from the front is hair. Between your legs there are two soft, cushiony things, also covered with hair, which press together when you’re standing, so you can’t see what’s inside.” How must reading this feel for pubescent girls who’ve already internalised the message that they must spend the rest of their lives maintaining the illusion that their body hair doesn’t exist.
  • Dealing with this discomfort only involves censoring Anne Frank’s diary if you’re quite, quite odd. For the rest of us, the answer might be a little more free-flowing boob, some brazen Mooncup sterilisation, hairy legs sprinting through the summer grasses and, to use a pun that is intended as the highest compliment, Frankness about masturbation, sexuality and our bodies. Because it isn’t just the Horaleks of this world who teach girls to be shameful rather than celebratory.
  • Emer O’Toole, “Anne Frank’s diary isn’t pornographic – it just reveals an uncomfortable truth”, The Guardian, (2 May 2013).

Tales from the Secret Annex

  • We all know that a good example is more effective than advice. So set a good example, and it won’t take long for others to follow.
    • “Give!” (26 March 1944)
    • Variant translation: People will always follow a good example; be the one to set a good example, then it won’t be long before the others follow.
  • How wonderful it is that no one has to wait, but can start right now to gradually change the world! How wonderful it is that everyone, great and small, can immediately help bring about justice by giving of themselves! […] You can always — always — give something, even if it’s a simple act of kindness!
    • “Give!” (26 March 1944)
    • Variant translation: How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before beginning to improve the world! […] You can always, always give something, even if it is only kindness!

Anne Frank Quotes

Disputed

  • Everyone has inside of him a piece of good news. The good news is that you don’t know how great you can be! How much you can love! What you can accomplish! And what your potential is!
    • As quoted in Networking the Kingdom: A Practical Strategy for Maximum Church Growth (1990) by O. J. Bryson, p. 187; this is the earliest source yet found for this attribution.
  • Look at how a single candle can both defy and define the darkness.
    • As quoted in 7 Laws of Human Nature: The Oneness of Universal Love (2017) by Conrad Spainhower and other self-help books and quotation sites.
  • No one has ever become poor by giving.
    • Attributed to Anne Frank in various self-help books but always without citation.

Quotes about Frank

  • Anne Frank’s legacy is still very much alive and it can address us fully, especially at a time when the map of the world is changing and when dark passions are awakening within people.
    • Vaclav Havel, as quoted in “Anne’s words still strengthen spirits” by Joyce Apsel in The St. Petersburg Times (26 January 2000)
  • Of the multitude who throughout history have spoken for human dignity in times of great suffering and loss, no voice is more compelling than that of Anne Frank.
    • John F. Kennedy, as quoted in “Anne’s words still strengthen spirits” by Joyce Apsel in The St. Petersburg Times (26 January 2000)
  • One single Anne Frank moves us more than the countless others who suffered just as she did, but whose faces have remained in the shadows. Perhaps it is better that way: If we were capable of taking in the suffering of all those people, we would not be able to live.
    • Primo Levi, as quoted in “Anne’s words still strengthen spirits” by Joyce Apsel in The St. Petersburg Times (26 January 2000)
  • Some of us read Anne Frank’s diary on Robben Island and derived much encouragement of it.
    • Nelson Mandela, as quoted in “Anne’s words still strengthen spirits” by Joyce Apsel in The St. Petersburg Times (26 January 2000)

Annelies Marie Frank was a German-born diarist. One of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust, she gained fame posthumously with the publication of The Diary of a Young Girl, in which she documents her life in hiding from 1942 to 1944, during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.

Anne Frank was one of the million Jewish children who died in the Holocaust. She was well-acclaimed for her style of writing in her diary, which she wrote during the Nazi invasion period. Her diary was later adapted into several plays and films. She was a German national by birth till 1941 but then she lost her nationality due to the anti-Semitic policies during the Nazi Germany period (as per the Nuremberg Laws). Anne frank’s family initially stayed in Germany but they later moved to Amsterdam in 1933. She, along with her family, was trapped in Amsterdam and they hid in Otto Frank’s, office building until Anne Frank along with her sister, Margot, was transferred to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. Both Anne and her sister died of typhus in March 1945 in the concentration camp. The only remaining survivor of her family, Otto Frank found her diary and took the initiative of publishing it in 1947 in Netherlands. It was initially written in Dutch but later published in English in 1952 with the title The Diary of a Young Girl. In this book, she shared her experiences during her hideout owing to the German invasion of the Netherlands at the time of World War II and she is internationally acclaimed for this book.

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