Ketubah

What Is Ketubah? A ketubah (כְּתוּבָּה, “written thing”; pl. ketubot) is a Jewish prenuptial agreement. It is considered an integral part of a traditional Jewish marriage, and outlines the rights and responsibilities of the groom, in relation to the bride. In modern practice, the ketubah has no agreed monetary value, and is seldom enforced...

Jewish Religious Terrorism

Jewish Religious Terrorism Jewish religious terrorism is religious terrorism committed by extremists within Judaism motivated by religious rather than ethnic or nationalistic beliefs.[1][2] History Zealotry in the 1st century According to a paper authored by then Center for Defense Information research analyst Mark Burgess, the 1st century Jewish political and religious movement called Zealotry was one of the first...

Fundamentalism

Fundamentalism Fundamentalism usually has a religious connotation that indicates unwavering attachment to a set of irreducible beliefs.[1] However, fundamentalism has come to be applied to a tendency among certain groups–mainly, although not exclusively, in religion–that is characterized by a markedly strict literalism as it is applied to certain specific scriptures, dogmas, or ideologies, and a strong sense...

Dreams: What Are They?

Dreams Dreams have at all times and among all peoples received much attention. In the youth of a nation, as in the youth of an individual, dreams are so vivid that they appear to be hardly distinguishable from reality. “In the primitive stages of human development, when all insight into...

Religions can coexist

Religion

What is Religion? Religion is a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, morals, worldviews, texts, sanctified places, prophecies, ethics, or organizations, that relates humanity to supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual elements. However, there is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] Different religions may or may not contain...

cemetery

Religious Views On Suicide

Religious Views On Suicide There are a variety of religious views on suicide Abrahamic religions Judaism Main article: Jewish views on suicide Suicides are frowned upon and buried in a separate part of a Jewish cemetery, and may not receive certain mourning rites. In practice, every means is used to excuse...

Organ Donation In Jewish Law

Organ Donation In Jewish Law Certain fundamental Jewish law questions arise in issues of organ donation. Donation of an organ from a living person to save another’s life, where the donor’s health will not appreciably suffer,[1] is permitted and encouraged in Jewish law. Donation of an organ from a dead person is equally...

Jewish Views On Suicide

Jewish Views On Suicide Jewish views on suicide are mixed. In Orthodox Judaism, suicide is forbidden by Jewish law, and viewed as a sin. Non-Orthodox forms of Judaism may instead recognize the act as more akin to a death by a disease or disorder (except in cases of purposeful assisted suicide). Rabbinical scholars (certainly...

Bereavement In Judaism

Bereavement In Judaism Bereavement in Judaism (אֲבֵלוּת, avelut, mourning) is a combination of minhag and mitzvah derived from Judaism’s classical Torah and rabbinic texts. The details of observance and practice vary according to each Jewish community. Mourners In Judaism, the principal mourners are the first-degree relatives: parent, child, sibling, and spouse. There are some...

church, sky Christianity

Second Death

Second Death The second death is an eschatological concept in Judaism and Christianity, related to punishment after a first, natural death. Judaism Main article: Jewish eschatology Although the term is not found in the Hebrew Bible, Sysling, in his study (1996) of Teḥiyyat ha-metim (“resurrection of the dead”) in the Palestinian Targums, identifies a consistent usage of the term “second...

Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve Adam and Eve, according to the creation myth of the Abrahamic religions,[1][2] were the first man and woman. They are central to the belief that humanity is in essence a single family, with everyone descended from a single pair of original ancestors.[3] It also provides the basis for the doctrines of the fall...

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The Resurrection In Revealed Scriptures

The Resurrection In Revealed Scriptures The Qur’an, the last heavenly Scriptures, has four main themes: God’s Existence and Unity, the Resurrection and afterlife, Prophethood, and worship and justice. It emphasizes the Resurrection far more than all previous Scriptures. Despite the distortion it has suffered, the Torah still has vers­es concerning...

Your Creation And Your Resurrection Are As But A Single Soul

Your Creation And Your Resurrection Are As But A Single Soul What does the verse: Your creation and your resurrection are as but a single soul (31:28) mean?60 Answer: That the Divine Power can create and resurrect humanity as easily as it creates and resurrects one person. For example, by virtue...

The Divine Purpose for The Creation of Man

Seven Heavens

Seven Heavens In religious or mythological cosmology, the seven heavens refer to seven levels or divisions of Heaven. The concept, derived from ancient Mesopotamian religions, can be found in the Abrahamic religions such as Islam, Judaism and Christianity; a similar concept is also found in some Indian religions such as Hinduism.[1] Some of these traditions,...

Garden of Eden

Garden of Eden The Garden of Eden (גַּן־עֵדֶן – gan-ʿḖḏen), also called Paradise, is the biblical “garden of God” described in the Book of Genesis and the Book of Ezekiel.[2][3] Genesis 13:10 refers to the “garden of God”,[4] and the “trees of the garden” are mentioned in Ezekiel 31.[5][5] The Book of Zechariah and the Book of Psalms also refer to trees and...

Speaking About The Resurrection

Speaking About The Resurrection Our next step should be to talk about the resurrection. The child should believe in their hearts that as soon as this life ends a new life, an everlasting afterlife, will begin. Science, wisdom and reality point out that Allah created this universe and that He...

Gog and Magog

What Is Gog and Magog? Gog and Magog (גּוֹג וּמָגוֹג, Gog u-Magog) appear in the Hebrew Bible as individuals, peoples, or lands. In Ezekiel 38, Gog is an individual and Magog is his land;[1] in Genesis 10 Magog is a man, but no Gog is mentioned; and centuries later Jewish tradition changed...

Heaven in Judaism

Heaven in Judaism Shamayim (שָׁמַיִם), the Hebrew word for “heaven” (literally heavens, plural), denotes one component of the three-part biblical cosmology, the other elements being erets (the earth) and sheol (the underworld). Shamayim is the dwelling place of God and other heavenly beings, erets is the home of the living, and sheol is the realm of the dead, including, in post-Hebrew Bible literature (including the New Testament), the abode of...

What Is Sheol?

Sheol She’ol (שְׁאוֹל Šəʾōl), in the Hebrew Bible, is a place of darkness to which all the dead go, both the righteous and the unrighteous, regardless of the moral choices made in life, a place of stillness and darkness cut off from life and from God.[1] The inhabitants of Sheol are the “shades”...

Jewish Mysticism

What Is Jewish Mysticism? Academic study of Jewish mysticism, especially since Gershom Scholem’s Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (1941), distinguishes between different forms of mysticism across different eras of Jewish history. Of these, Kabbalah, which emerged in 12th-century Europe, is the most well known, but not the only typologic form, or the earliest to emerge. Among previous...

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