Nontrinitarianism

Nontrinitarianism is a form of Christianity that rejects the mainstream Christian doctrine of the Trinity—the teaching that God is three distinct hypostases or persons who are coeternal, coequal, and indivisibly united in one being, or essence (from the Greek ousia). Certain religious groups that emerged during the Protestant Reformation have historically been known as antitrinitarian, but are not considered Protestant in popular discourse due to their nontrinitarian nature. See Being and Existence

According to churches that consider the decisions of ecumenical councils final, Trinitarianism was definitively declared to be Christian doctrine at the 4th-century ecumenical councils, that of the First Council of Nicaea (325), which declared the full divinity of the Son, and the First Council of Constantinople (381), which declared the divinity of the Holy Spirit.

A fresco inside the catacomb of Priscilla in Rome

A fresco inside the catacomb of Priscilla in Rome, November 2013. The catacomb was used for Christian burials from the late 2nd through the 4th century CE. Photo by Reuters/Max Rossi

Main articles

Traditional Christian groups

Modern Christian groups

Mormonism

Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit

Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit

Trinity

God as Trinity

God the Father

God the Son

God the Holy Spirit

Son of God

History of Trinity

Trinity in Scripture

Trinity related issues

Non-Christian Views of the Trinity

Jesus

Jesus (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ or simply Christ, was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader. Jesus, The Son of Mary is the central figure of Christianity and also prophet in Islam is widely described as the most influential person in history. Most Christians believe he is the incarnation of God the Son and the awaited Messiah (Christ) prophesied in the Old Testament.

From birth to the Passion

The Passion

Resurrection and Ascension

Coming of Jesus (End Time)

Perspectives

Depictions of Jesus

Associated relics

FAQ about Jesus

nativity

Nativity scene

Mary, mother of Jesus

Mary, mother of Jesus was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament and the Quran. Mary, called by various titles, styles, and honorifics in Christianity and called Maryam, mother of ‘Isa, in Islam, was a Jewish woman of Nazareth in Galilee who lived in the late 1st century BC and early 1st century AD

Who is Mary, Mother of Jesus?

Chronology

Mary in culture

Perspectives on Mary

Marian dogmas

Scroll Up