Chinese Wisdom For Contemplation

Whilst in the life of the intellect ‘contemplation’ refers to thinking profoundly about something, in the religious life contemplation is a kind of inner vision or seeing, transcendent of the intellect, facilitated by means of practices such as prayer or meditation.

We have collected and put the best Chinese Wisdom For Contemplation. Enjoy reading these insights and feel free to share this page on your social media to inspire others. See also: Samples From Chinese Wisdom, Chinese Proverbs, Chinese Sages

May these Chinese Wisdom on many subjects inspire you to never give up and keep working towards your goals. Who knows—success could be just around the corner.

The sage is like water.
Water is good, nourishes all things,
and does not compete with them.
It dwells in humble places that others disdain,
hence it is close to the Tao.
In his dwelling, the sage loves the earth.
In his mind, he loves what is profound.
In his associations, he is kind and gentle.
In his speech, he is sincere.
In his ruling, he is just.
In business, he is proficient.
In his action, he is timely.
Because he does not compete,
he does not find fault in others.
— Lao Tzu (604-517 BC)
Tao Te Ching, VIII
The sage has nine wishes.
In seeing, he wishes to see clearly.
In hearing, he wishes to hear distinctly.
In his expression, he wishes to be warm.
In his appearance, he wishes to be respectful.
In his speech, he wishes to be sincere.
In business, he wishes to be serious.
Universal love is called humanity.
To practice this in the proper manner is called righteousness.
To proceed according to these is called the Tao.
To be sufficient in oneself without depending on anything outside is called virtue.
— Han Yu (768-824)
An Inquiry on the Tao, Ch. 2

Sincerity is the foundation of the sage. “Great is the creative, the originator! All things receive their birth from it.” It is the source of sincerity. “The Creative’s way is to change and transform so that everything will obtain its correct nature and destiny.” In this way sincerity is established. It is pure and perfectly good. Therefore “the successive movement of yin and yang constitutes the Tao. What comes for the Tao is good, and that which realizes it is the individual nature.” Origination and flourish characterize the penetration of sincerity, and advantage and firmness are its completion. Great is the Change, the source of nature and destiny.

Chou Tun-Yi (1017-1073)
Penetrating Book of Change

The four directions plus upward and downward constitute the space continuum. The past and the future constitute the time continuum. The universe is my mind and my mind is the universe. Sages appeared tens of thousands of generations ago. They shared this mind; they shared this principle. Sages will appear tens of thousands of generations to come. They will share this mind; they will share this principle. Over the four seas sages appear. They share this mind; they share this principle.

Lu Hsiang-Shan (1139-1193)
Complete Works, XXII.5a

How can knowledge and action be separated? This is the original substance of knowledge and action, which have not been separated by selfish desires. In teaching people, the Sage insisted that only this can be called knowledge. Otherwise, this is not yet knowledge. This is serious and practical business… I have said that knowledge is the direction for action and action the effort of knowledge, and that knowledge is the beginning of action and action the completion of knowledge. If this is understood, then when only knowledge is mentioned, action is included, and when only action is mentioned, knowledge is included… But people today distinguish between knowledge and action and pursue them separately, believing that one must know before he can act. They will discuss and learn the business of knowledge first, they say, and wait till they truly know before they put their knowledge into practice. Consequently, to the last day of life, they will never act and also will never know. This doctrine of knowledge first and action later is not a minor disease and it did not come about only yesterday. My present advocacy of the unity of knowledge and action is precisely the medicine for that disease.

Wang Yang Ming (1472-1529)
Instructions for Practical Living, I.8a

Instead of looking upon the internal as right and the external as wrong, it is better to forget the distinction. When such a distinction is forgotten, the state of quietness and peace is attained. Peace leads to calmness and calmness leads to enlightenment. When one is enlightened, how can the response to things become an impediment? The sage is joyous because according to the nature of things before him he should be joyous, and he is angry because according to the nature of things before him he should be angry. Thus the joy and anger of the sage do not depend on his own mind but on things.

Ch’eng Hao (1032-1085)
Literary Works, III.1b

Empty and tranquil, and without any sign, and yet all things are luxuriantly present. The state before there is any response to it is not an earlier one, and the state after there has been response to it is not a later one. It is like a tree one hundred feet high. From the root to the branches and leaves, there is one sap running through them all.

Ch’eng I (1033-1107)
Works of the Two Ch’engs, XV.8a

Universal love is called humanity. To practice this in the proper manner is called righteousness. To proceed according to these is called the Tao. To be sufficient in oneself without depending on anything outside is called virtue.

Han Yu (768-824)
An Inquiry on the Tao, Ch. 2

One who commands our liking because of his virtue is called a good man. One who is sincere with himself is called a true man. He whose goodness is extensive and solid is called a beautiful man. He whose goodness is abundant and is brilliantly displayed is called a great man. When one is great and is completely transformed to be goodness itself, he is called a sage. When a sage is beyond our knowledge, he is called a man of the spirit.

Mencius (371-289 BC)
Book of Mencius, VIIB.25

The sage is a spiritual being. Even if great oceans burned up, he would not feel hot. Even if the great rivers are frozen, he would not feel cold. And even if terrific thunder were to break up mountains and the wind were to upset the sea, he would not be afraid. Being such, he mounts upon the clouds and forces of heaven, rides on the sun and the moon, and roams beyond the four seas. Neither life no death affects him. How much less can such matters as gain and loss?

Chuang Tzu (399-295 BC)
The Chuang Tzu, Ch. II

By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; second is by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest — Confucius

 

The swiftest horse can’t overtake a word once spoken.

Before telling secrets on the road, look in the bushes.

A bad word whispered echoes a hundred miles.

In a flood of words, surely some mistakes.

A sharp tongue or pen can kill without a knife.

If the first words fail, ten thousand will then not avail.

Watching chess games in silence. . .a superior person.

The judge with seven reasons states only one in court.

If you want no one to know, don’t do it.

If you want your dinner, don’t insult the cook.

Honest scales and full measure hurt no one.

Divide an orange–it tastes just as good.

If you always give you will always have.

Better lean and good than fat and evil.

Touch black paint, have black fingers.

The swiftest horse can’t overtake a word once spoken.

Before telling secrets on the road, look in the bushes.

A bad word whispered echoes a hundred miles.

In a flood of words, surely some mistakes.

A sharp tongue or pen can kill without a knife.

If the first words fail, ten thousand will then not avail.

Watching chess games in silence. . .a superior person.

The judge with seven reasons states only one in court.

If you want no one to know, don’t do it.

If you want your dinner, don’t insult the cook.

Honest scales and full measure hurt no one.

Divide an orange–it tastes just as good.

If you always give you will always have.

Better lean and good than fat and evil.

To build it took one hundred years; to destroy it one day.

If you hurry through long days, you will hurry through short years.

Touch black paint, have black fingers.

The ripest fruit falls by itself.

Simple to open a shop; another thing to keep it open.

What you don’t see, you don’t desire.

Neither fortunes nor flowers last forever.

An inch of gold can’t buy an inch of time.

Don’t waste your hour–the sun sets soon.

My life–a candle in the wind. . . frost on the leaves.

Nurture the plant one year–ten days of flowers.

Slow work–fine work.

At birth we bring our nothing; at death we leave with the same.

A king’s riches cannot buy an extra year.

Beat the drum inside the house to spare the neighbors.

Climb the mountains to see lowlands.

Laws control a lesser person; right conduct controls a greater one.

Forget the favors given; remember those received.

A careful foot can step anywhere.

To succeed, consult three old people.

To know the road ahead, ask those returning.

Stare at the profit and step in the pitfall.

In bed be wife and husband, in the hall each other’s honored guest.

To stop drinking, study a drunkard while you are sober.

If Heaven made someone, earth can find some use for them.

Without sorrows no one becomes a saint.

The pine stays green in winter. . . wisdom in hardship.

Three feet of ice were not frozen in a day.

With virtue you can’t be completely poor; without it you can’t be truly rich.

Determination tempers the sword of your character.

Stout men, not stout walls, make the stout city.

To be heard afar, bang your gong on a hilltop.

Great doubts, deep wisdom. . . small doubts, little wisdom.

To know others, know yourself first.

His virtues exceed his talents–a superior man.

When the waters drop, the rocks appear.

O eggs, don’t fight with rocks.

Easier to rule a nation than a child.

To have principles first have courage.

Blame yourself as you blame others; forgive others as you forgive yourself.

The wise listens to her mind, the foolish to the mob.

A whitewashed crow soon shows black again.

Watch over workers at their labors, not their meals.

Many a good face under a ragged hat.

Dogs have no prejudice against the poor.

If Heaven made someone, earth can find some use for them.

Tile tossed over the wall. . . who knows where it will fall?.

No horse can wear two saddles.

While you are bargaining, conceal your coin.

No guests at home, no hosts abroad.

“I heard” is good; “I saw” is better.

We can study until old age. . . and still not finish.

A good teacher. . . better than a barrowful of books.

Teachers open the door; you enter by yourself.

 

 

 

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