Hinduism is an Indian religion and dharma, or way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia

Hinduism is a religion with various Gods and Goddesses. According to Hinduism, three Gods rule the world. Brahma: the creator; Vishnu: the preserver and Shiva: the destroyer. Lord Vishnu did his job of preserving the world by incarnating himself in different forms at times of crisis.

Prajna (Hinduism)

Prajna (Hinduism) Prajña or Pragya (प्रज्ञ) as प्रज्ञा, प्राज्ञ and प्राज्ञा is used to refer to the highest and purest form of wisdom, intelligence and understanding. Pragya is the state of wisdom which is higher than the knowledge obtained by reasoning and inference. See also: Prajñā (Buddhism) Meaning The Sanskrit word प्रज्ञ...

Kapila

Who Is Kapila? Kapila (कपिल) is a given name of different individuals in ancient and medieval Indian texts, of which the most well-known is the founder of the Samkhya school of Hindu philosophy.[1][2] Kapila of Samkhya fame is considered a Vedic sage,[2][3] estimated to have lived in the 6th-century BCE,[4] or the 7th-century BCE.[5] Rishi Kapila is...

What Is Kama?

Kama Kama (काम) means “desire, wish, longing” in Hindu and Buddhist literature.[3] Kama often connotes sexual desire and longing in contemporary literature, but the concept more broadly refers to any desire, wish, passion, longing, pleasure of the senses, the aesthetic enjoyment of life, affection, or love, with or without sexual connotations.[4][5] Kama is one...

Marriage In Hinduism

Marriage In Hinduism Hindu marriage joins two individuals for life, so that they can pursue dharma (duty), artha (possessions), and kama (physical desires). It is a union of two individuals as spouses, and is recognized by law. In Hinduism, marriage is followed by traditional rituals for consummation. In fact, marriage...

Women In Hinduism

Women In Hinduism Hindu texts present diverse and conflicting views on the position of women, ranging from feminine leadership as the highest goddess, to limiting her role to an obedient daughter, housewife and mother. The Devi Sukta hymn of Rigveda, a scripture of Hinduism, declares the feminine energy as the essence of the...

Buddhism Dharma Wheel

Dharma

What Is Dharma? Dharma (धम्म, dhamma, translit. dhamma) is a key concept with multiple meanings in Indian religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and others.[8] There is no single-word translation for dharma in Western languages.[9] In Hinduism, dharma signifies behaviors that are considered to be in accord with Ṛta, the order that makes life and universe possible,[10] and includes...

Hindutva

What Is Hindutva? Hindutva (“Hinduness”) is the predominant form of Hindu nationalism in India. The term was popularised by Vinayak Damodar Savarkar in 1923.[1] It is championed by the Hindu nationalist volunteer organisation Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), Vishva Hindu Parishad (VHP) and Hindu Sena. The Hindutva movement has been described as “almost fascist in the classical sense”, adhering to a disputed...

Hindu Cosmology

What Is Hindu Cosmology? In Hindu cosmology, the universe is cyclically created and destroyed.[1] Its cosmology divides time into four epochs or Yuga, of which the current period is the Kali Yuga. Description According to Hindu vedic cosmology, there is no absolute start to time, as it is considered infinite and cyclic.[2] Similarly,...

Moksha

What Is Moksha? Moksha (मोक्ष, mokṣa), also called vimoksha, vimukti and mukti,[1] is a term in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism which refers to various forms of emancipation, enlightenment, liberation, and release.[2] In its soteriological and eschatological senses, it refers to freedom from saṃsāra, the cycle of death and rebirth.[3] In its epistemological and psychological senses, moksha refers to freedom...

Naraka in Hinduism

Naraka in Hinduism Naraka (नरक) is the Hindu equivalent of Hell, where sinners are tormented after death.[1] It is also the abode of Yama, the god of Death. It is described as located in the south of the universe and beneath the earth. The number and names of hells, as well as the type of sinners...

animal worship Hinduism

Hindu Eschatology

What Is Hindu Eschatology? Hindu eschatology is linked in the Vaishnavite tradition to the figure of Kalki, or the tenth and last avatar of Vishnu or Shiva names of the Supreme Being in Hinduism and before the age draws to a close, and Harihara simultaneously dissolves and regenerates the universe....

Mandala

What Is Mandala? A mandala (मण्डल, maṇḍala – literally “circle”) is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the universe.[1] In common use, “mandala” has become a generic term for any diagram, chart or geometric pattern that represents the cosmos metaphysically or symbolically; a microcosm of the universe. The basic form of most...

Vijñāna

What Is Vijñāna? Vijñāna (Sanskrit) or viññāṇa (Pāli)[1] is translated as “consciousness,” “life force,” “mind,”[2] or “discernment.”[3] In the Pāli Canon’s Sutta Pitaka‘s first four nikāyas, viññāṇa is one of three overlapping Pali terms used to refer to the mind, the others being manas and citta.[4][5][6] Each is used in the generic and non-technical sense of “mind” in general, but the three...

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Hindu Music

What Is Hindu Music? Hindu music is music created for or influenced by Hinduism. It includes Indian classical music, Kirtan, Bhajan and other musical genres. Raagas are a common form of Hindu music in classical India. The most common Hindu bhajan in North India is “Om Jai Jagdish Hare.” The...

Bhakti Yoga

What Is Bhakti Yoga? Bhakti yoga, also called Bhakti marga, is a spiritual path or spiritual practice within Hinduism focused on loving devotion towards a personal god.[1][2] It is one of the paths in the spiritual practices of Hindus, others being Jnana yoga and Karma yoga. The tradition has ancient roots. Bhakti is mentioned in the Shvetashvatara Upanishad where it simply means participation,...

Dhyana in Hinduism

Dhyana in Hinduism Dhyana in Hinduism means contemplation and meditation.[1] Dhyana is taken up in Yoga exercises, and is a means to samadhi and self-knowledge.[2] The various concepts of dhyana and its practice originated in the Vedic era of Hinduism, and the practice has been influential within the diverse traditions of Hinduism.[3][4] It is, in Hinduism, a part of a self-directed...

Bhagavad Gita Passages

Bhagavad Gita Passages The undisciplined person eats too much, or doesn’t eat enough. The undisciplined person sleeps too much, or doesn’t sleep enough… The spiritual discipline that destroys suffering goes to the person who eats the proper amount of food, does the proper amount of exercise, performs the proper amount...

Sutra

What Is Sutra? Sutra (sūtra सूत्र “string” or “thread”.[1] sutta) in Indian literary traditions refers to an aphorism or a collection of aphorisms in the form of a manual or, more broadly, a condensed manual or text. Sutras are a genre of ancient and medieval Indian texts found in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.[2][1]...

Vedanga

What Is Vedanga? The Vedanga (वेदाङ्ग, vedāṅga, “limbs of the Veda”) are six auxiliary disciplines in Vedic culture that developed in ancient times, and have been connected with the study of the Vedas.[1][2]These are:[1] Shiksha (śikṣā): phonetics, phonology, pronunciation.[1] This auxiliary discipline has focussed on the letters of the Sanskrit alphabet, accent, quantity, stress, melody and rules of...

Itihasa

What Is Itihasa? Itihasa, meaning history in Sanskrit, consists of the Mahabharata and the Ramayana (sometimes the Puranas too, are included). The Mahabharata includes the story of the Kurukshetra War and also preserves the traditions of the Lunar dynasty in the form of embedded tales. The Puranas narrate the universal history as...

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