Buddhism

Gautama Buddha Quotes

Gautama Buddha Quotes Siddhārtha Gautama (सिद्धार्थ गौतम Siddhārtha Gautama, c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE) or Siddhattha Gotama in Pali,; also called the Gautama Buddha, the Shakyamuni Buddha (“Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas”) or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was  monk (śramaṇa), mendicant, sage, philosopher, teacher and...

Gautama Buddha

Gautama Buddha Siddhārtha Gautama (सिद्धार्थ गौतम Siddhārtha Gautama, c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE) or Siddhattha Gotama in Pali, also called the Gautama Buddha, the Shakyamuni Buddha (“Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas”)[4] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was a monk (śramaṇa),[5][6] mendicant, sage,[4] philosopher, teacher and religious leader on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.[7] He is believed to have lived and taught...

4 Ways to Take Your Yoga Routine to the Next Level

4 Ways to Take Your Yoga Routine to the Next Level There is nothing quite like the study and practice of yoga to help you get fit, stay centered, and grow as a human being. Yoga has long been one of the top forms of exercise all around the world,...

Buddha Quotes

Buddha Quotes Siddhartha Gautama Buddha, Siddhattha Gotama was a teacher and religious leader. “Buddha“, meaning awakened one or enlightened one is a title, not a name. Shakyamuni Buddha, whose original name was Gautama, was the founder of Buddhism. We have collected and put his best quotes in the following categories. Enjoy reading these insights and feel free to...

Religious Views On The Self

Religious Views On The Self Religious views on the self vary widely. The self is a complex and core subject in many forms of spirituality. In Western psychology, the concept of self comes from Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Carl Rogers where the self is the inner critic. Some Eastern philosophies reject the self as...

Be Being Presence Here Now Spirit Soul Essence

Nondualism

What Is Nondualism? In spirituality, nondualism, also called non-duality, means “not two” or “one undivided without a second”.[1][2] Nondualism primarily refers to a mature state of consciousness, in which the dichotomy of I-other is “transcended”, and awareness is described as “centerless” and “without dichotomies”. Although this state of consciousness may seem to...

Reclining Buddha Laos Temple Buddhism Landmark

Buddhism

What Is Buddhism? Buddhism is the world’s fourth-largest religion[3][4] with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists.[5] Buddhism encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. It originated in ancient India as a Sramana tradition sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, spreading through much of Asia. Two major...

Buddhism And Western Philosophy

Buddhism And Western Philosophy Buddhist thought and Western philosophy include several parallels. Before the 20th century, a few European thinkers such as Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche had engaged with Buddhist thought. Likewise, in Asian nations with Buddhist populations, there were also attempts to bring the insights of Western thought...

Buddhist Modernism

What Is Buddhist Modernism? Buddhist modernism (also referred to as modern Buddhism,[1] modernist Buddhism[2] and Neo-Buddhism[3]) are new movements based on modern era reinterpretations of Buddhism.[4][5][6] David McMahan states that modernism in Buddhism is similar to those found in other religions. The sources of influences have variously been an engagement of Buddhist communities and teachers with the...

Spiritual Naturalism

What Spiritual Naturalism? Spiritual naturalism, or naturalistic spirituality combines mundane and spiritual ways of looking at the world.[1] Spiritual naturalism may have first been proposed by Joris-Karl Huysmans in 1895 in his book En Route – “In ‘En Route’ Huysmans started upon the creation of what he called ‘Spiritual Naturalism,’ that is, realism applied to the story...

Kapila

Who Is Kapila? Kapila (कपिल) is a given name of different individuals in ancient and medieval Indian texts, of which the most well-known is the founder of the Samkhya school of Hindu philosophy.[1][2] Kapila of Samkhya fame is considered a Vedic sage,[2][3] estimated to have lived in the 6th-century BCE,[4] or the 7th-century BCE.[5] Rishi Kapila is...

Japanese Philosophy

What Is Japanese Philosophy? Japanese philosophy has historically been a fusion of both indigenous Shinto and continental religions, such as Buddhism and Confucianism. Formerly heavily influenced by both Chinese philosophy and Indian philosophy, as with Mitogaku and Zen, much modern Japanese philosophy is now also influenced by Western philosophy. Ancient and medieval thought Main article: Buddhism in Japan Before feudalism was...

Women In Buddhism

Women In Buddhism Women in Buddhism is a topic that can be approached from varied perspectives including those of theology, history, anthropology and feminism. Topical interests include the theological status of women, the treatment of women in Buddhist societies at home and in public, the history of women in Buddhism, and a...

Buddhism Dharma Wheel

Dharma

What Is Dharma? Dharma (धम्म, dhamma, translit. dhamma) is a key concept with multiple meanings in Indian religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and others.[8] There is no single-word translation for dharma in Western languages.[9] In Hinduism, dharma signifies behaviors that are considered to be in accord with Ṛta, the order that makes life and universe possible,[10] and includes...

Orthodoxy

What Is Orthodoxy? Orthodoxy (from Greek orthodoxía “right opinion”)[1] is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion.[2] In the Christian sense the term means “conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early Church.”[3] The first seven ecumenical councils were held between the years of 325 and 787 with the aim...

Buddhism And Violence

Buddhism And Violence The relationship between Buddhism and violence includes acts of violence and aggression committed by Buddhists with religious, political, or socio-cultural motivations, as well as self-inflicted violence by ascetics or for religious purposes.[1] Buddhism is generally seen as among the religious traditions least associated with violence.[2] However, in the history of...

Morality and Religion

Morality and Religion Morality and religion is the relationship between religious views and morals. Many religions have value frameworks regarding personal behavior meant to guide adherents in determining between right and wrong. These include the Triple Gems of Jainism, Islam’s Sharia, Catholicism’s Canon Law, Buddhism’s Eightfold Path, and Zoroastrianism’s “good...

Religions can coexist

Religion

What is Religion? Religion is a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, morals, worldviews, texts, sanctified places, prophecies, ethics, or organizations, that relates humanity to supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual elements. However, there is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] Different religions may or may not contain...

cemetery

Religious Views On Suicide

Religious Views On Suicide There are a variety of religious views on suicide Abrahamic religions Judaism Main article: Jewish views on suicide Suicides are frowned upon and buried in a separate part of a Jewish cemetery, and may not receive certain mourning rites. In practice, every means is used to excuse...

Karma in Buddhism

Karma in Buddhism Karma (karman, kamma) is a Sanskrit term that literally means “action” or “doing”. In the Buddhist tradition, karma refers to action driven by intention (cetanā) which leads to future consequences. Those intentions are considered to be the determining factor in the kind of rebirth in samsara, the cycle...

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