Buddhism is an Indian religion and encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies.

Buddhism is a path of practice and spiritual development leading to Insight into the true nature of reality. 

East Asian Buddhism

East Asian Buddhism East Asian Buddhism or East Asian Mahayana is a collective term for the schools of Mahāyāna Buddhism that developed in East Asia and follow the Chinese Buddhist canon. These include the various forms of Chinese Buddhism, Japanese Buddhism, Vietnamese Buddhism, and Korean Buddhism. Besides being a major religion in...

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Buddhism And Science

Buddhism And Science Buddhism and science have increasingly been discussed as compatible, and Buddhism has entered into the science and religion dialogue.[1] The case is made that the philosophic and psychological teachings within Buddhism share commonalities with modern scientific and philosophic thought. For example, Buddhism encourages the impartial investigation of Nature (an activity referred to as Dhamma-Vicaya in...

Heart Sutra

Heart Sutra The Heart Sūtra (प्रज्ञापारमिताहृदय Prajñāpāramitāhṛdaya: 心經 Xīnjīng) is a popular sutra in Mahāyāna Buddhism. Its Sanskrit title, Prajñāpāramitāhṛdaya, can be translated as “The Heart of the Perfection of Wisdom”. The sutra famously states, “Form is empty, emptiness is form.” (śūnyatā). It is a condensed exposé on the Buddhist Mahayana teaching of the Two...

Buddhism and Jainism

Buddhism and Jainism Buddhism and Jainism are two ancient Indian religions that developed in Magadha (Bihar) and continue to thrive in the modern age. Mahavira and Gautama Buddha are generally accepted as contemporaries. Jainism and Buddhism share many features, terminology and ethical principles, but emphasize them differently.Both are śramaṇa ascetic traditions that believe it is possible to attain liberation from the cycle of rebirths and...

Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism Tibetan Buddhism (also Indo-Tibetan Buddhism) is the form of Buddhism practiced in Tibet where it is the dominant religion. It is also found in the regions surrounding the Himalayas (such as Bhutan, Ladakh, and Sikkim), much of Chinese Central Asia, the Southern Siberian regions such as Tuva, as well as...

Buddhist Folktales and Parables

Buddhist Folktales and Parables The Father A young single father had a son that he loved more than anything in the world. One day while the father was away, some plunderers burned down most of his village and kidnapped the little boy. When the father came back, he mistook one...

Prajna or Panna in Buddhism

Prajna or Panna in Buddhism In Sanskrit and Pali, This Is the Word for Wisdom Prajna is Sanskrit for “wisdom.” Panna is the Pali equivalent, more often used in Theravada Buddhism. But what is “wisdom” in Buddhism? The English word wisdom is linked to knowledge. If you look the word up in dictionaries, you find definitions such...

The Wisdom of The Other Bank

The Wisdom of The Other Bank Fine mysticism of Buddhism—The man who was born blind—The Tevigga Sutta—The Sinner—The Penitent Thief—”God revealed in the form of mercy—Death of Buddha. If the Roman Catholics were told that St. Francois de Salis, or St. Jerome, “altogether ignored in nature any spiritual aspirations,” * they would feel a...

Fundamentals of Buddhism: Wisdom

Fundamentals of Buddhism: Wisdom Today we are going to complete our survey of the Noble Eightfold Path. In the last two weeks, we have looked at good conduct and mental development. Today, we have the third group to look at, and that is the wisdom group. Here we have an...

Noble Eightfold Path

Noble Eightfold Path The Noble Eightfold Path (ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo; āryāṣṭāṅgamārga)[1] is an early summary of the path of Buddhist practices leading to liberation from samsara, the painful cycle of rebirth.[2][3] The Eightfold Path consists of eight practices: right view, right resolve, right speech, right conduct, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right samadhi (‘meditative absorption or union’).[4] In...

Four Noble Truths

Four Noble Truths In Buddhism, the Four Noble Truths (catvāri āryasatyāni; cattāri ariyasaccāni) are “the truths of the Noble Ones,”[1] the truths or realities which are understood by the “worthy ones” who have attained nirvana.[2] The truths are: dukkha, “incapable of satisfying,” painful;[3][4][5][6] samudaya, the “arising” of dukkha together with tanha (“thirst,” desire, craving); nirodha, “cessation” of dukkha by “confinement” of tanha; and marga, the path leading to...

The Basics of Buddhist Wisdom

The Basics of Buddhist Wisdom The Four Noble Truths Life is suffering; Suffering is due to attachment; Attachment can be overcome; There is a path for accomplishing this. Suffering is perhaps the most common translation for the Sanskrit word duhkha, which can also be translated as imperfect, stressful, or filled...

Tirukkural: The Book of Wisdom

Tirukkural: The Book of Wisdom Ancient Text on Virtue, Wealth & Love The Tirukkural (திருக்குறள், literally Sacred Verses), or shortly the Kural, is a classic Tamil language text consisting of 1,330 couplets or Kurals.[3] The text is divided into three books, each with aphoristic teachings on virtue (aram, dharma), wealth (porul, artha) and love (inbam, kama).[1][4][5] Considered one of the greatest...

Dalai Lama

Dalai Lama Dalai Lama (ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་) is a title given by the Tibetan people for the foremost spiritual leader of the Gelug or “Yellow Hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the classical schools of Tibetan Buddhism.[3] The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso, who lives as a refugee in India. See Also: Dalai Lama Quotes...

Prajñā in Buddhism

Prajñā in Buddhism Prajñā (Sanskrit) or paññā (Pāli), often translated as “wisdom”, is the state of understanding. It is described in Buddhist commentaries as the understanding of the true nature of phenomena. In the context of Buddhist meditation, it is the ability to understand the three characteristics of all things: anicca (impermanence), dukkha (dissatisfaction or suffering), and anattā (non-self). Mahāyāna texts describe...

Gautama Buddha

Gautama Buddha Siddhārtha Gautama (सिद्धार्थ गौतम Siddhārtha Gautama, c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE) or Siddhattha Gotama in Pali, also called the Gautama Buddha, the Shakyamuni Buddha (“Buddha, Sage of the Shakyas”)[4] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was a monk (śramaṇa),[5][6] mendicant, sage,[4] philosopher, teacher and religious leader on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.[7] He is believed to have lived and taught...

Reclining Buddha Laos Temple Buddhism Landmark

Buddhism

What Is Buddhism? Buddhism is the world’s fourth-largest religion[3][4] with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists.[5] Buddhism encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. It originated in ancient India as a Sramana tradition sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, spreading through much of Asia. Two major...

Buddhism And Western Philosophy

Buddhism And Western Philosophy Buddhist thought and Western philosophy include several parallels. Before the 20th century, a few European thinkers such as Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche had engaged with Buddhist thought. Likewise, in Asian nations with Buddhist populations, there were also attempts to bring the insights of Western thought...

Buddhist Modernism

What Is Buddhist Modernism? Buddhist modernism (also referred to as modern Buddhism,[1] modernist Buddhism[2] and Neo-Buddhism[3]) are new movements based on modern era reinterpretations of Buddhism.[4][5][6] David McMahan states that modernism in Buddhism is similar to those found in other religions. The sources of influences have variously been an engagement of Buddhist communities and teachers with the...

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Criticism Of Buddhism

Criticism Of Buddhism Criticism of Buddhism has taken numerous different forms, including that its practitioners act in ways contrary to Buddhist principles or that those principles systemically marginalize women. There are many sources of criticism, both ancient and modern, stemming from other religions, the non-religious, and other Buddhists. Criticism of...

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