Torii Shrine Sea Itsukushima Shinto Shrine God

Shinto Sects and Schools

Shinto Sects and Schools Shinto (神道, shintō), the folk religion of Japan, developed a diversity of schools and sects, outbranching from the original Ko-Shintō (ancient Shintō) since Buddhism was introduced into Japan in the sixth century. Early period schools and groups The main Shinto schools with traditions traceable to early periods, according to authoritative published...

Headquarters of Reiyū-kai.

Japanese New Religions

Japanese New Religions Japanese new religions are new religious movements established in Japan. In Japanese, they are called shinshūkyō (新宗教) or shinkō shūkyō (新興宗教). Japanese scholars classify all religious organizations founded since the middle of the 19th century as “new religions”; thus, the term refers to a great diversity and number of organizations....

The Great Buddha (Daibutsu) at Kōtoku-in, Kamakura, in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan (National Treasure)

Shinbutsu-shugo

Shinbutsu-shugo Shinbutsu-shūgō (神仏習合, “syncretism of kami and buddhas”), also called Shinbutsu-konkō (神仏混淆, “jumbling up” or “contamination of kami and buddhas”), is the syncretism of Shinto and Buddhism that was Japan’s only organized religion up until the Meiji period. Beginning in 1868, the new Meiji government approved a series of laws that separated Japanese native kami worship, on one side,...

Ontake-jinja, a Shinto shrine on Mount Ontake for the worship of the mountain's god.

Religion in Japan

Religion in Japan The majority of Japanese people profess to adhere to both Shinto (the indigenous religion of Japan) and Buddhism. Buddhism  and Shintoism are the two major religions in Japan. According to the annual statistical research on religion in 2015 by the Agency for Culture Affairs, Government of Japan, 70.4 percent of the population...

A laïcité parade in Beirut Central District, Lebanon (see Secularism in Lebanon)

Secularity

Secularity Secularity (meaning “worldly”, “of a generation”, “temporal”, or a span of about 100 years) is the state of being separate from religion, or of not being exclusively allied with or against any particular religion. Historically, the word secular was not related or linked to religion, but was a freestanding term in Latin...

Cancun Pyramid Maya Temple Mayan Mexico Ancient

Indigenous Religions

Indigenous Religions Indigenous religions or Nature Religion that consist of the traditional customs and beliefs (Paganism, Animism, Totemism, Shamanism) of particular ethnic groups, refined and expanded upon for thousands of years, often lacking formal doctrine. Indigenous religions, formerly found on every continent, but now marginalized by the major organized faiths....

Byōdō-in (Pure Land sect), located in Uji, Kyoto

Buddhism in Japan

Buddhism in Japan Buddhism in Japan has been practiced since its official introduction in 552 CE according to the Nihon Shoki from Baekje, Korea, by Buddhist monks. Buddhism has had a major influence on the development of Japanese society and remains an influential aspect of the culture to this day. In modern times, Japan’s popular...

Kasuga-taisha—Middle gate and hall, World Heritage Site and one of the National Treasures of Japan

Shinto

Shinto or Shintoism Shinto (神道 Shintō or Shintoism or kami-no-michi) is the traditional religion of Japan that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day Japan and its ancient past. Classified as an East Asian religion by scholars of religion, its practitioners often regard it as Japan’s indigenous religion and as a nature...

Shinto Music

Shinto Music

What is Shinto Music? Shinto music is the ceremonial and festive music of Shinto (神道), the native religion of Japan. Its origin myth is the erotic dance of Ame-no-Uzume-no-Mikoto which lured Amaterasu from her cave. Kagura Kagura (神楽) or ‘entertainment of the gods’ includes music, dance and poetry and comprises mi-kagura of the court, o-kagura of major shrines such as Ise Jingū, and village sato-kagura....

Sacred Texts

Religious Texts

Religious Texts Religious texts or sacred texts (also known as scripture, or scriptures, from the Latin scriptura, meaning “writing”) are texts which religious traditions consider to be central to their practice or beliefs. Religious texts may be used to provide meaning and purpose, evoke a deeper connection with the divine, convey religious...

From left to right: Hotei, Jurōjin, Fukurokuju, Bishamonten, Benzaiten, Daikokuten, Ebisu

List of Japanese Deities

List of Japanese Deities This is a list of divinities native to Japanese beliefs and religious traditions. Many of these are from Shinto, while others were imported via Buddhism or Taoism and “integrated” into Japanese mythology and folklore. Kami, shin, or, archaically, jin (神) is defined in English as “god“, “spirit“, or “spiritual essence”, all these terms meaning “the energy...

Kami

What is Kami?

What is Kami? Kami (神) are the spirits or phenomena that are worshipped in the religion of Shinto. They can be elements of the landscape, forces of nature, as well as beings and the qualities that these beings express; they can also be the spirits of venerated dead persons. Many...

Religious Music

Religious Music Religious music (also sacred music) is music performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence.[1] Ritual music is music, sacred or not, performed or composed for or as ritual. The religious music that is commonly considered Western had its beginnings in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, as did Western religions...

Torii Gate Japan Fushimi Inari Torii Kyoto Shrine

A Prayer From The Shinto Religion

A Prayer from the Shinto religion Shinto (神道 Shintō or Shintoism or kami-no-michi) is the traditional religion of Japan that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day Japan and its ancient past. Classified as an East Asian religion by scholars of religion, its practitioners often regard it as Japan’s indigenous...

Shinto rituals begin with a process of purification, often involving the washing of the hands and mouth at the temizu basin; this example is at Itsukushima Jinja.

Shinto Concept of Sin

Shinto Concept of Sin In Shinto, there is no concept of original sin or karma. But ancient Japanese considered all unhappy or unfortunate incidents, such as diseases or natural hazards, as sins. Yet, they were not the cause in the individual, but in external factors. And they considered sin to...

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