Yoga Buddhism

Deity Yoga

What Is Deity Yoga? Deity yoga involves two stages, the generation stage and the completion stage. In the generation stage, one dissolves the mundane world and visualizes one’s chosen deity (yidam), its mandala and companion deities, resulting in identification with this divine reality.[2] In the completion stage, one dissolves the visualization of and identification with...

Hatha Yoga

What Is Hatha Yoga? Haṭha yoga is a branch of Yoga. The Sanskrit word हठ haṭha literally means “force” and thus alludes to a system of physical techniques. In India, haṭha yoga is associated in popular tradition with the ‘Yogis’ of the Natha Sampradaya through its mythical founder Matsyendranath. Matsyendranath, also known as Minanath or Minapa in Tibet, is...

The Theory of Karma

The Theory of Karma Karma is the law of moral causation. The theory of Karma is a fundamental doctrine in Buddhism. This belief was prevalent in India before the advent of the Buddha. Nevertheless, it was the Buddha who explained and formulated this doctrine in the complete form in which...

Buddhist Meditation

What Is Buddhist Meditation? Buddhist meditation is the practice of meditation in Buddhism. The closest words for meditation in the classical languages of Buddhism are bhāvanā (“mental development”) and jhāna/dhyāna (mental training resulting in a calm and luminous mind). Buddhists pursue meditation as part of the path toward liberation, awakening and Nirvana, and includes...

Creator in Buddhism

Creator in Buddhism Buddhist thought consistently rejects the notion of a creator deity.[1][2] It teaches the concept of gods, heavens and rebirths in its Saṃsāra doctrine, but it considers none of these gods as a creator. Buddhism posits that mundane deities such as Mahabrahma are misconstrued to be a creator.[3] Buddhist ontology follows...

Nirvana in Buddhism

Nirvana (Buddhism) Nirvana (निर्वाण, nirvāṇa, nibbana, nibbāna) is the earliest and most common term used to describe the goal of the Buddhist path.[1] The literal meaning is “blowing out” or “quenching.”[2] It is the ultimate spiritual goal in Buddhism and marks the soteriological release from rebirths in saṃsāra.[1][3] Nirvana is part of the...

Buddhist Devotion

Buddhist Devotion

Buddhist Devotion Most Buddhists use ritual in pursuit of their spiritual aspirations. Common devotional practices are receiving a blessing, making merit, making a resolution, prostrating, making offerings, chanting traditional texts and pilgrimage. Moreover, many types of visualizations, recollections and mantras are used in Buddhist meditation in different traditions to devote oneself to a Buddha or a teacher. The often...

Buddha

Ātman In Buddhism

Ātman (Buddhism) Most Buddhist traditions and texts reject the premise of a permanent, unchanging atman (self, soul).[2][3] However, some Buddhist schools, sutras and tantras present the notion of an atman or permanent “Self”, although mostly referring to an Absolute and not to a personal self.Ātman (/ˈɑːtmən/), attā or attan in Buddhism is the concept of self, and is found in Buddhist literature’s discussion of...

Mahavidya

What Is Mahavidya? Mahavidyas (Great Wisdoms) are a group of ten aspects of Adi Parashakti in Hinduism. After the decline of Buddhism in India, Sakta and Buddhist goddesses were combined to form this list of ten.[1] The development of Mahavidyas represents an important turning point in the history of Shaktism as it marks the rise of Bhakti aspect in Shaktism, which reached its zenith...

Religious Music

Religious Music Religious music (also sacred music) is music performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence.[1] Ritual music is music, sacred or not, performed or composed for or as ritual. The religious music that is commonly considered Western had its beginnings in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, as did Western religions...

Buddhist Views On Sin

Buddhist Views On Sin There are a few differing Buddhist views on sin. American Zen author Brad Warner states that in Buddhism there is no concept of sin at all.[1][2] The Buddha Dharma Education Association also expressly states “The idea of sin or original sin has no place in Buddhism.”[3] Zen student and author Barbara O’Brien has said that...

Buddhism’s Sacred Texts

What Are The Buddhist Texts? Buddhist texts were initially passed on orally by monks, but were later written down and composed as manuscripts in various Indo-Aryan languages which were then translated into other local languages as Buddhism spread. They can be categorized in a number of ways. The Western terms “scripture” and “canonical” are applied...

Mahayana

What Is Mahayana? Mahāyāna (“Great Vehicle”) is one of two main existing branches of Buddhism (the other being Theravada) and a term for classification of Buddhist philosophiesand practice. This movement added a further set of discourses, and although it was initially small in India, it had long-term historical significance.[1] The Buddhist tradition of Vajrayana is sometimes classified...

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