Buddhist Folktales and Parables

Buddhist Folktales and Parables The Father A young single father had a son that he loved more than anything in the world. One day while the father was away, some plunderers burned down most of his village and kidnapped the little boy. When the father came back, he mistook one...

Prajna or Panna in Buddhism

Prajna or Panna in Buddhism In Sanskrit and Pali, This Is the Word for Wisdom Prajna is Sanskrit for “wisdom.” Panna is the Pali equivalent, more often used in Theravada Buddhism. But what is “wisdom” in Buddhism? The English word wisdom is linked to knowledge. If you look the word up in dictionaries, you find definitions such...

The Wisdom of The Other Bank

The Wisdom of The Other Bank Fine mysticism of Buddhism—The man who was born blind—The Tevigga Sutta—The Sinner—The Penitent Thief—”God revealed in the form of mercy—Death of Buddha. If the Roman Catholics were told that St. Francois de Salis, or St. Jerome, “altogether ignored in nature any spiritual aspirations,” * they would feel a...

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Fundamentals of Buddhism: Wisdom

Fundamentals of Buddhism: Wisdom Today we are going to complete our survey of the Noble Eightfold Path. In the last two weeks, we have looked at good conduct and mental development. Today, we have the third group to look at, and that is the wisdom group. Here we have an...

Noble Eightfold Path

Noble Eightfold Path The Noble Eightfold Path (ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo; āryāṣṭāṅgamārga)[1] is an early summary of the path of Buddhist practices leading to liberation from samsara, the painful cycle of rebirth.[2][3] The Eightfold Path consists of eight practices: right view, right resolve, right speech, right conduct, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right samadhi (‘meditative absorption or union’).[4] In...

The Basics of Buddhist Wisdom

The Basics of Buddhist Wisdom The Four Noble Truths Life is suffering; Suffering is due to attachment; Attachment can be overcome; There is a path for accomplishing this. Suffering is perhaps the most common translation for the Sanskrit word duhkha, which can also be translated as imperfect, stressful, or filled...

Tirukkural: The Book of Wisdom

Tirukkural: The Book of Wisdom Ancient Text on Virtue, Wealth & Love The Tirukkural (திருக்குறள், literally Sacred Verses), or shortly the Kural, is a classic Tamil language text consisting of 1,330 couplets or Kurals.[3] The text is divided into three books, each with aphoristic teachings on virtue (aram, dharma), wealth (porul, artha) and love (inbam, kama).[1][4][5] Considered one of the greatest...

Prajñā in Buddhism

Prajñā in Buddhism Prajñā (Sanskrit) or paññā (Pāli), often translated as “wisdom”, is the state of understanding. It is described in Buddhist commentaries as the understanding of the true nature of phenomena. In the context of Buddhist meditation, it is the ability to understand the three characteristics of all things: anicca (impermanence), dukkha (dissatisfaction or suffering), and anattā (non-self). Mahāyāna texts describe...

Buddha

Buddhism

What is Buddhism? Buddhism is the world’s fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists. Buddhism encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism is a path of practice and spiritual...

Women In Buddhism

Women In Buddhism Women in Buddhism is a topic that can be approached from varied perspectives including those of theology, history, anthropology and feminism. Topical interests include the theological status of women, the treatment of women in Buddhist societies at home and in public, the history of women in Buddhism, and a...

Buddhism And Violence

Buddhism And Violence The relationship between Buddhism and violence includes acts of violence and aggression committed by Buddhists with religious, political, or socio-cultural motivations, as well as self-inflicted violence by ascetics or for religious purposes.[1] Buddhism is generally seen as among the religious traditions least associated with violence.[2] However, in the history of...

Buddhist Cosmology

Buddhist Cosmology Buddhist cosmology is the description of the shape and evolution of the Universe according to the Buddhist scriptures and commentaries. It consists of temporal and spatial cosmology: the temporal cosmology being the division of the existence of a ‘world’ into four discrete moments (the creation, duration, dissolution, and state of being...

Yoga Buddhism

Deity Yoga

What Is Deity Yoga? Deity yoga involves two stages, the generation stage and the completion stage. In the generation stage, one dissolves the mundane world and visualizes one’s chosen deity (yidam), its mandala and companion deities, resulting in identification with this divine reality.[2] In the completion stage, one dissolves the visualization of and identification with...

Hatha Yoga

What Is Hatha Yoga? Haṭha yoga is a branch of Yoga. The Sanskrit word हठ haṭha literally means “force” and thus alludes to a system of physical techniques. In India, haṭha yoga is associated in popular tradition with the ‘Yogis’ of the Natha Sampradaya through its mythical founder Matsyendranath. Matsyendranath, also known as Minanath or Minapa in Tibet, is...

The Theory of Karma

The Theory of Karma Karma is the law of moral causation. The theory of Karma is a fundamental doctrine in Buddhism. This belief was prevalent in India before the advent of the Buddha. Nevertheless, it was the Buddha who explained and formulated this doctrine in the complete form in which...

Buddhist Meditation

What Is Buddhist Meditation? Buddhist meditation is the practice of meditation in Buddhism. The closest words for meditation in the classical languages of Buddhism are bhāvanā (“mental development”) and jhāna/dhyāna (mental training resulting in a calm and luminous mind). Buddhists pursue meditation as part of the path toward liberation, awakening and Nirvana, and includes...

Creator in Buddhism

Creator in Buddhism Buddhist thought consistently rejects the notion of a creator deity.[1][2] It teaches the concept of gods, heavens and rebirths in its Saṃsāra doctrine, but it considers none of these gods as a creator. Buddhism posits that mundane deities such as Mahabrahma are misconstrued to be a creator.[3] Buddhist ontology follows...

Nirvana in Buddhism

Nirvana in Buddhism Nirvana (निर्वाण, nirvāṇa, nibbana, nibbāna) is the earliest and most common term used to describe the goal of the Buddhist path.[1] The literal meaning is “blowing out” or “quenching.”[2] It is the ultimate spiritual goal in Buddhism and marks the soteriological release from rebirths in saṃsāra.[1][3] Nirvana is part of...

Prostration is done as an expression of humility and an acknowledgement of the other's spiritual experience.

Buddhist Devotion

Buddhist Devotion Most Buddhists use ritual in pursuit of their spiritual aspirations. Common devotional practices are receiving a blessing, making merit, making a resolution, prostrating, making offerings, chanting traditional texts and pilgrimage. Moreover, many types of visualizations, recollections and mantras are used in Buddhist meditation in different traditions to devote oneself to a Buddha or a teacher. The often...

Buddha

Ātman In Buddhism

Ātman (Buddhism) Most Buddhist traditions and texts reject the premise of a permanent, unchanging atman (self, soul).[2][3] However, some Buddhist schools, sutras and tantras present the notion of an atman or permanent “Self”, although mostly referring to an Absolute and not to a personal self.Ātman (/ˈɑːtmən/), attā or attan in Buddhism is the concept of self, and is found in Buddhist literature’s discussion of...

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