Russian Proverbs

Proverbs and sayings are words of wisdom, told and retold for centuries. They have been tested by time, and this is what makes them so priceless. When in doubt, try to think of a proverb and it will guide you to the right path.

Russia (Росси́йская Федера́ция), also known as the Russian Federation, is a country extending over much of northern Eurasia. A former member of the Soviet Union before its collapse and dissolution in 1991, Russia is a semi-presidential republic comprising 83 federal subjects and shares land borders with the following countries (counterclockwise from northwest to southeast): Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania (via Kaliningrad Oblast), Poland (via Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It also borders the Arctic Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, the Caspian Sea, the Baltic Sea, and the Black Sea. Russia also has maritime borders with the United States of America via Alaska and Japan.

Doll Babuschka 3d Hand painted Russian Figure

Matryoshka Russian Doll

‘Tis a hard winter when one wolf eats another. – Russian Proverb

A bachelor is never sent as a go-between. – Russian Proverb

A bad dancer always has trouble with his balls. – Russian Proverb

A bad peace is better than a good quarrel. – Russian Proverb

A bad rumour flies on wings. – Russian Proverb

A beaten one is worth two unbeaten ones. – Russian Proverb

A bird may be known by its flight. – Russian Proverb
(A person is know and judged by his actions or behavior)

A bird may be known by its flight. – Russian Proverb

A boat stands firmer with two anchors. – Russian Proverb

A cat always knows whose meat it eats. – Russian Proverb

A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. – Russian Proverb

A cross-eyed Tsar, one-eyed ministers, blind subjects. – Russian Proverb

 A day is long, but a lifetime is short. – Russian Proverb

A dog is wiser than a woman; it does not bark at its master. – Russian Proverb

A dog on the hay: will neither eat it himself, nor let others eat it. – Russian Proverb

A dog on the hay: will neither eat it himself, nor let others eat. – Russian Proverb

A drawing man clutches at straw. – Russian Proverb

A drop from every mug makes for a house for the barmaid. – Russian Proverb

A drop hollows out a stone. – Russian Proverb
(Persistence will achieve a difficult objective)

A drop in the sea. – Russian Proverb

A drop of water in the eyes of the Tsar costs the country many handkerchiefs. – Russian Proverb

A drowning man will clutch at straw. – Russian Proverb

A field held in common is always ravaged by bears. – Russian Proverb

A field in common is always ravaged by bears. – Russian Proverb

A fisherman can recognize another fisherman from afar. – Russian Proverb

A fly cannot enter a closed mouth. – Russian Proverb
(It is desirable, and may be more effective, remain silent in some circumstances)

A fly will not get into a closed mouth. – Russian Proverb

A fool is not afraid to lose his mind. – Russian Proverb

A fool may throw into a well a stone which a hundred wise men cannot pull out. – Russian Proverb

A friendly word is like a spring day. – Russian Proverb

A girl never grows into a lady. A girl never grows into a lady. – Russian Proverb

A glass for the vodka, for the beer a mug, and for the table, cheerful company. – Russian Proverb

A golden handshake convinces even the most skeptical judge. – Russian Proverb

A good borrower is a lazy payer. – Russian Proverb

A good citizen owes his life to his country. – Russian Proverb

A good laugh is sunshine in a house. – Russian Proverb

A good man maybe, but it’s best to shoot him. – Russian Proverb

A good merchant has neither money nor goods. – Russian Proverb

A good wife and a wholesome cabbage soup, what more could you want? – Russian Proverb

A good-looking man is pleasant to look at, but it is easier to live with an amusing one. – Russian Proverb

A goose doesn’t befriend a pig. – Russian Proverb

A gowk at yule’ll no be bright at beltane. – Russian Proverb

A guest has not to thank the host, but the host the guest. – Russian Proverb

A hammer breaks glass, but also forms steel. – Russian Proverb

A hammer will shatter glass yet it can forge steel. – Russian Proverb

A handful of dirt is pleasing if it’s your own land. – Russian Proverb

A Horse has four legs, but still stumbles. – Russian Proverb

A judge and a stomach do their asking in silence. – Russian Proverb

A jug that has been mended lasts two hundred years. – Russian Proverb

A kind word is like a spring day. – Russian Proverb

A kopeck saves the rouble, and the rouble guards your head. – Russian Proverb

A liar can go round the world but cannot come back. – Russian Proverb

A little spark kindles a great fire. – Russian Proverb

A lizard on a cushion will still seek leaves. – Russian Proverb

A lonely person is at home everywhere. – Russian Proverb

A long pull and a strong pull and a pull altogether. – Russian Proverb

A lucky man can stumble upon a treasure while an unlucky one can’t even find a mushroom. – Russian Proverb

A man is judged by his deeds, not by his words. – Russian Proverb
(People can say many things,because talking is easy,but it is more important what person does than what he says he will do)

A man should not be struck when he is down. – Russian Proverb
(Never hit an opponent who has fallen, do not attack or hurt a person in misfortune who cannot “fight back”)

A man without a wife is like a man in winter without a fur cap. – Russian Proverb

A mile walk with a friend has only one hundred steps. – Russian Proverb

A mile walked with a friend has only one hundred steps. – Russian Proverb

A net will catch more than a pole. – Russian Proverb

A new broom sweeps in a new way. – Russian Proverb

A nightingale doesn’t feed on songs. – Russian Proverb

A Party member is an active person. – Russian Proverb

A person never gets tired working for himself. – Russian Proverb

A pessimist is a well-informed optimist. – Russian Proverb

A pig in a parlor is still a pig. – Russian Proverb

A pig will find mud. – Russian Proverb

A priest’s beard is always soaked in butter. – Russian Proverb

A priest’s belly is made up of several sheepskins. – Russian Proverb

A proverb can’t be judged. – Russian Proverb

A ruler without a nation is like a flower without the sun. – Russian Proverb

A sea will not dry up, a nation will not get lost. – Russian Proverb

A silent man is not a conquered man. – Russian Proverb

A sin of gold is followed by a punishment of lead. – Russian Proverb

A single Russian hair outweighs half a Pole. – Russian Proverb

A sleeping fox counts chicken in his dreams. – Russian Proverb

A smart person will not climb a mountain; A smart person will go around it. – Russian Proverb

A soldier on furlough lets his shirt hang out of his trousers. – Russian Proverb

A soldier who doesn’t dream of becoming a general is a bad one. – Russian Proverbs

A sparrow in the hand is better than a cock on the roof. – Russian Proverb
(It is better to be content with what we have or can easily get than to lose it by trying to get something better, as this may never happen)

A spoken word flies; you won’t catch it. – Russian Proverb

A spoken word is like a sparrow that once has flown away, cannot be caught again. – Russian Proverb

A spoken word is not a sparrow. – Russian Proverb

A spoken word is not a sparrow. Once it flies out, you can’t catch it. – Russian Proverb

A spooked crow is afraid of a bush. – Russian Proverb

A spoonful of tar in a barrel of honey. – Russian Proverb

A stranger’s soul is like a dark forest. – Russian Proverb

A tale is soon told; a deed is not soon done. – Russian Proverb

A thief’s hat is burning. – Russian Proverb

A thousand friends are few; one enemy is too many. – Russian Proverb

A thread from everyone will make a shirt for the needy. – Russian Proverb

A titmouse in the hand is better than a crane in the sky. – Russian Proverb

A toad too would like to crack nuts, but he has no teeth. – Russian Proverb

A virgin’s heart is a dark forest. – Russian Proverb

A wife is not a pot, she will not break so easily. – Russian Proverb

A wife should be as humble as a lamb, busy as a bee, as beautiful as a bird of paradise and faithful as a turtle dove. – Russian Proverb

A wise companion is half the journey. – Russian Proverb

A wise man sees only water in the tears of a woman. – Russian Proverb

A wolf won’t eat wolf. – Russian Proverb
(People of the same group, occupation, interests live, or should live, together in amity)

A woman farmer had no trouble, so she bought a piglet. – Russian Proverb

A woman’s tongue is longer than her hair. – Russian Proverb

A wooden bed is better than a golden coffin. – Russian Proverb

A word of kindness is better than a bottle of vodka. – Russian Proverb

A young man should not marry yet, an old man not at all. – Russian Proverb

Absentmindedness is searching for the horse you are riding. – Russian Proverb

Abuse doesn’t hang on the collar. – Russian Proverb

Accidents will happen in the best-regulated families. – Russian Proverb

Acknowledgement is half of correction. – Russian Proverb

Advertising is the driving force of business. – Russian Proverb

Afraid of the enemies – don’t be a border guard. – Russian Proverb

After a storm (comes) fair weather, after sorrow (comes) joy. – Russian Proverb
(There must be something better after every piece of unpleasantness)

After a storm comes fair weather, after sorrow comes joy. – Russian Proverb

After a storm fair weather, after sorrow joy. – Russian Proverb

After all, every man is the son of a woman. – Russian Proverb

After the head is off, one does not cry over the hair. – Russian Proverb

After your daughter is married, there comes a number of potential sons-in-law. – Russian Proverb

All ages are submissive to love. – Russian Proverb

All are not cooks who walk with long knives. – Russian Proverb
(Good looks do not always go to with virtue, and ugliness does not always go with sin)

All cats are grey at night. – Russian Proverb
(All shapes,all colors are alike in the dark. The night obscure all distinguishing features)

All is not gold that glitters. – Russian Proverb
(A person or thing may not be as good,valuable,etc., as he or it first appears; appearances can be deceptive)

All is well that ends well. – Russian Proverb

All lay loads on a willing horse. – Russian Proverb

All roads do not lead to Rome. – Russian Proverb

All roads lead to Moscow. – Russian Proverb

All roads lead to Rome. – Russian Proverb
(A number of persons arrive at one common objective by different means.All ways or methods of fulfilling a certain intention end in the same results.)

All the cones drop on poor makar. – Russian Proverb

An agreement is more valuable than money. – Russian Proverb

An argument is fine only when there is to be a fight. – Russian Proverb

An axe does not cut down a tree by itself. – Russian Proverb

An egg is dear on Easter day. – Russian Proverb

An empty barrel makes the greatest sound. – Russian Proverb
(Ignorant stupid people talk more often and more loudly than wise ones; just as an empty pot makes a loud noise when it is struck, while a full pot makes little noise)

An empty barrel rattles louder. – Russian Proverb

An empty mill will turn without the wind. – Russian Proverb

An enemy will agree, but a friend will argue. – Russian Proverb

An enemy will agree, but a friend will argue. – Russian Proverbs

An icon for the mind is like raw vodka for the stomach.– Russian Proverb

An ill-paying job is better than a lucrative heist. – Russian Proverb

An indispensable thing never has much value. – Russian Proverb

An old dog can’t get used to chains. – Russian Proverb

An old friend is better than two new ones. – Russian Proverb

An old loan repaid is like finding something new. – Russian Proverb

An old man telling lies is like a rich man stealing. – Russian Proverb

An uninvited guest is worse than the Mongol invasion. – Russian Proverb

An unsolicited guest is better than a solicited one. – Russian Proverb

An unsolicited guest is worse than a Tatar. – Russian Proverb

Any fish is good if it is on the hook. – Russian Proverb
(The fisherman can make use of every kind of fish that he catches,large and small.One should make use of every opportunity that comes one’s way)

Any sandpiper is great in his own swamp. – Russian Proverb
(It is easy to brag of your deeds in familiar surroundings where you are safe from danger and not likely to be put to proof)

Around bread there will always be crumbs. – Russian Proverb

As busy as a bee. – Russian Proverb

As chicken is not a bird, woman is not a human being. – Russian Proverb

As cold waters to a thirsty soul, so is good news from a far place. – Russian Proverb

As hungry as a wolf. – Russian Proverb

As is well that ends well. – Russian Proverb
(If the final result is good,previous failures are forgotten and there is no need to complain, since the end result is the most importance thing)

As long as a child does not cry, it does not matter what pleases it. – Russian Proverb

As long as the fish swims in the water, don’t light up the grill. – Russian Proverb

As long as the sun shines one does not ask for the moon. – Russian Proverb

As soon as your cart is turned over, everyone rushes to give you advice. – Russian Proverb

As twice two is four. – Russian Proverb

 As you brew, so must you drink. – Russian Proverb

As you cooked the porridge, so must you eat it. – Russian Proverb
(Every must take consequences of his own actions)

As you make your bed, so you will sleep. – Russian Proverb
(A person must take the responsibility for the results of his own unwise actions; just as a man who makes his bed badly will certainly sleep uncomfortably.)

Ask a lot, but take what is offered. – Russian Proverb

Ask a silly question and you get a silly answer. – Russian Proverb

Asking is no sin, and being refused is no tragedy. – Russian Proverb

Bad luck is fertile. – Russian Proverb

Badly oiled wheels will squeak. – Russian Proverb

Be patient, cossack, and you’ll be a chieftain. – Russian Proverb

Be wise, but pretend to be ignorant. – Russian Proverb

Beat your own and others will fear you. – Russian Proverb

Beauty is the sister of idleness and the mother of luxury. – Russian Proverb

Beauty’s sister is vanity, and its daughter lust. – Russian Proverb

Before we went to churches and bars – now we go to clubs and cinemas. – Russian Proverb

Berry by berry, a basket will be full. – Russian Proverb

Best is the enemy of good. – Russian Proverb

Better a bed of wood than a bier of gold. – Russian Proverb

Better a dove on the plate than a woodgrouse in the mating place. – Russian Proverb
(It is better to accept something small than to reject it and hope to get more later on)

Better a fair pair of heels than a halter. – Russian Proverb

Better late than never. – Russian Proverb
(It is better to come (to repent, to do something,etc) late than never to come (to repent,to do something,etc.) at all)

Better to stumble than make a slip of the tongue. – Russian Proverb
(It is better to do something wrong that to say something wrong, because it is sometimes more difficult to improve something said than something done)

Better to turn back than to lose your way. – Russian Proverb

Better too aware than too unaware. – Russian Proverb

Between hammer and anvil. – Russian Proverb

Beware of a quiet dog and still water. – Russian Proverb
(You should not afraid of people who make threats and shout in a loud voice; it is the people who are quiet and say little that must really be feared)

Big voyage for a big ship. Big voyage for a big ship. – Russian Proverb

Both cheap and angry. – Russian Proverb

Bread and salt never quarrel. – Russian Proverb

Bury truth in a golden coffin, it will break it open. – Russian Proverb

Call a pot, just don’t put into the oven. – Russian Proverb

Cat died of curiosity. – Russian Proverb

Chickens are counted in autumn. – Russian Proverb
(Do not be sure of success,victory,etc.,until all difficulties have been overcome; make sure that a thing is actually yours before you speak or act as if it were already yours)

Chipped china lasts two centuries. – Russian Proverb

Choose a matchmaker, not a bride. – Russian Proverb

Clemency is the support of justice. – Russian Proverb

Clever father, clever daughter; clever mother, clever son. – Russian Proverb

Close to the Tsar, close to death. – Russian Proverb

Confide a secret to a dumb man and he will speak. – Russian Proverb

Conversation shortens the distance, singing lightens the load. – Russian Proverb

Cows forget that they were calves. – Russian Proverb

Creditors have better memories than debtors. – Russian Proverb

Crows are black the world over. – Russian Proverb

Cry and the whole world cries with you. – Russian Proverb

Cry not for the hair when the head is off. – Russian Proverb

Cry not out before you are hurt. – Russian Proverb

Curious Varvara’s nose was torn off. – Russian Proverb
(A person who tries to find out too much about other people’s affairs is likely to suffer injury or harm; a warning to mind one’s own business)

Custom is stronger than law. – Russian Proverb

Cut down the tree that you are able to. – Russian Proverb
(Do not undertake more than you are able to perform or something that is too difficult)

Death answers before it is asked. – Russian Proverb

Death carries on its shoulders a heavy Tsar just as easily as a light beggar. – Russian Proverb

Death does not come free of charge, for it costs us our life. – Russian Proverb

Death does not take the old but the ripe. – Russian Proverb

Death is a giant against whom even the Tsars must draw weapons. – Russian Proverb

Death is not found behind mountains but right behind our shoulders. – Russian Proverb

Do not be born good or handsome, but be born lucky. – Russian Proverbs

Do not carry rubbish out of your hut. – Russian Proverb
(Do not discuss your fault, mistakes, private, and especially family, grievances, troubles, quarrels, scandals, etc., in public)

Do not cut the bough you are sitting on. – Russian Proverb
(do not act in such a way as to do yourself harm)

Do not dig a hole for somebody else; you yourself will fall into it. – Russian Proverb
(Mistakes, misdeeds, etc., come back as an unpleasant effect on the person who originally made the mistakes, did the misdeeds, etc)

Do not look at gift horse’s mouth. – Russian Proverb
(Never criticize or express displeasure when you receive a gift;be thankful that you have it at all.(examination of a horse’s mouth reveals a lot about its age and condition)

Do not look for further good from good. – Russian Proverb

Do not look for good from good. – Russian Proverb

Do not make an elephant out of a fly. – Russian Proverb
(Do not worry or become excited about matters that are not really important at all. Do not exaggerate the importance of matters)

Do not make jokes that cost more than a ruble. – Russian Proverb

Do not make me kiss, and you will not make me sin. – Russian Proverb

Do not measure (others) by your own arshin (=28 inches) – Russian Proverb
(Do not judge others by yourself; do not apply your own standard to other)

Do not measure others by your own yardstick. – Russian Proverb

Do not plant a tree with its root upward. – Russian Proverb
(Do not do or say things in the wrong order; do not reverse the right or natural order of things)

Do not plant a tree with the roots upward. – Russian Proverb

Do not play with fire – you will burn yourself. – Russian Proverb
(Do not take risks with dangerous articles,especially when it is foolish and unnecessary; do not put yourself into a position that may be dangerous)

Do not praise yourself when going of to battle going into battle; praise yourself coming out of battle. – Russian Proverb
(Do not rejoice till you are sure that your difficulties are at an end)

Do not spit in the well – you may be thirsty by and by. – Russian Proverb

Do not spit into a well-it may be useful to drink water. – Russian Proverb

Do not spit into the well that you might need to drink out of. – Russian Proverb

Do not spit into the well you may have to drink of. – Russian Proverb

Do not teach a learned person. – Russian Proverb

Do not teach a pike to swim, a pike knows his own science. – Russian Proverb
(Do not tell or show somebody how to do something that he can do perfectly well and probably better than you yourself)

Don’t be so clever; cleverer ones than you are in jail. – Russian Proverb

Don’t blame your wife’s side if your son is cross-eyed. – Russian Proverb

Don’t boast when you start out, but when you get there. – Russian Proverb

Don’t buy the house, buy the neighborhood. – Russian Proverb

Don’t chat on the phone – a talker is a great find for a spy. – Russian Proverb

Don’t dig a hole for someone else, as you will fall into it yourself. – Russian Proverb

Don’t drive a Binya into the woods if he has found his way to your house. – Russian Proverb

Don’t fight with the strong one, don’t sue the rich one. – Russian Proverb

Don’t hope for rain or thunder, hope for an agronomist. – Russian Proverb

Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth. – Russian Proverb

Don’t be so clever; cleverer ones than you are in jail. – Russian Proverb

Don’t blame your wife’s side if your son is cross-eyed. – Russian Proverb

Don’t boast when you start out, but when you get there. – Russian Proverb

Don’t buy the house, buy the neighborhood. – Russian Proverb

Don’t chat on the phone – a talker is a great find for a spy. – Russian Proverb

Don’t dig a hole for someone else, as you will fall into it yourself. – Russian Proverb

Don’t drive a Binya into the woods if he has found his way to your house. – Russian Proverb

Don’t fight with the strong one, don’t sue the rich one. – Russian Proverb

Don’t hope for rain or thunder, hope for an agronomist. – Russian Proverb

Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth. – Russian Proverb

Don’t look for a sea when you can drown in a puddle. – Russian Proverb

Don’t pluck the apple while it is green; when it is ripe it will fall of itself. – Russian Proverb

Don’t praise your furnace when the house is cold. – Russian Proverb

Don’t put all eggs in one basket. – Russian Proverb

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. – Russian Proverb

Don’t put it in my ear, but in my hand. – Russian Proverb

Don’t put new wine into old bottles. – Russian Proverb

Don’t raise your stick and the dog won’t bark at you. – Russian Proverb

Don’t swear off of beggary and jail. – Russian Proverb

Don’t wake up trouble while it sleeps quietly. – Russian Proverb

Don’t worry if you borrow, but worry if you lend. – Russian Proverb

Drowning man clutches at straw. – Russian Proverb
(Anyone in desperate circumstances will try every possible means to escape from danger or difficulty even though he knows it is unlikely to be successful)

Each day learns from the one before it, but no day teaches the one after it. – Russian Proverb

Each time it is different. – Russian Proverb

Ears do not grow higher than the head. – Russian Proverb

Eat until you are half full; drink until you are half drunk. – Russian Proverb

Eat what is cooked; listen to what is said. – Russian Proverb

Eggs cannot teach a hen. – Russian Proverb
(Do not give advice to someone who is more experienced than you; do not teach a person who is wiser and more knowledgeable)

Eggs don’t teach the hens anything. – Russian Proverb

Either chest in crosses, or a head in bushes. – Russian Proverb

Elderberries in the yard and an uncle in Kiev. – Russian Proverb

Elder-berry is in the kitchen-garden, therefore your Uncle is in Kiev. – Russian Proverb

Envy can breed swans from bad duck eggs. – Russian Proverb

Envy sees the sea but not the rocks. – Russian Proverb

Eternal peace lasts only until the next war. – Russian Proverb

Eternal peace lasts until the next war. – Russian Proverb

Eternity makes room for a salty cucumber. – Russian Proverb

Even a blind pig finds an acorn every once in awhile. – Russian Proverb

Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn sometimes. – Russian Proverb

Even an eagle will not fly higher than the sun. – Russian Proverb

Even an old lady makes mistakes. – Russian Proverb

Even good dogs have fleas. – Russian Proverb

Even honor is not an honor, if there is nothing to eat. – Russian Proverb

Even in the ashes there will be a few sparks. – Russian Proverb

Even one person in the field is a warrior, if he is a soviet warrior. – Russian Proverb

Even pulling a fish out of the pond requires some effort. – Russian Proverb

Even vinegar is sweet when for freebie. – Russian Proverb

Even walls may have ears. – Russian Proverb

Every Ananya has his Melanie. – Russian Proverb

Every cricket must know its hearth. – Russian Proverb

Every day is a messenger of God. – Russian Proverb

Every peasant is proud of the pond in his village because from it he measures the sea. – Russian Proverb

Every road has two directions. – Russian Proverb

Every sandpiper praises his own swamp. – Russian Proverb

Every sandpiper praises its own swamp. – Russian Proverb
(Every man praises what is familar and dear to him)

Every seed knows its time == All in good time. – Russian Proverb
(One should not be impatient and hasten events; everything will work out after some time,but not immediately)

Every seed knows its time. – Russian Proverb

Every vegetable has its time. – Russian Proverb

Everyone has his own Czar in his head. – Russian Proverbs

Everyone loves the tree that gives him shelter. – Russian Proverb

Everything cannot be hung on one nail. – Russian Proverb

Everything is funny as long as it happens to someone else. – Russian Proverb

Everything tastes bitter to him with gall in his mouth. – Russian Proverb

Eyes are afraid, but hands are doing the job. – Russian Proverb

Fear has big eyes. – Russian Proverb

Fear has large eyes. – Russian Proverb

Fear the goat from the front, the horse from the rear, and a man from all sides. – Russian Proverb

Fear the Greeks bearing gifts. – Russian Proverb

Fear the law not the judge. – Russian Proverb

Fedot, yet not the one. – Russian Proverb

Fedot, yet not the right one. – Russian Proverb

Feel free to jabber, Emelya-it’s your week. – Russian Proverb

Fighting for your country glorifies death. – Russian Proverb

First do it, then say it. – Russian Proverb

First the stable, then the cow. – Russian Proverb

Fishermen recognize each other from far away. – Russian Proverb

Flies and priests can enter any house. – Russian Proverb

Fools make feasts and wise men eat them. – Russian Proverb

For a drunkard the sea only reaches his knees. – Russian Proverb

For a drunken one a sea is knee-deep, and a puddle – ears-deep. – Russian Proverb

For a mad dog, seven versts is not a long detour. – Russian Proverb

For a poor man, to prepare for a trip means belt himself. – Russian Proverb

For each wise man there are plenty of fools. – Russian Proverb

For every one with a plow-there’re seven with a spoon. – Russian Proverb

For him who does not believe in signs, there is no way to live in the world. – Russian Proverb

For ill do well, Then fear not hell. – Russian Proverb

For some people war is war, for others – dear mother. – Russian Proverb

Force a fool to pray and he’ll crack his forehead. – Russian Proverb

Forgiveness is a pillar of justice. – Russian Proverb

Fortune and misfortune live in the same courtyard. – Russian Proverb

Freedom for the free and heaven for the saved. – Russian Proverb

Friendship is friendship, but keep our tobacco apart. – Russian Proverb

Friendship is one thing and tobacco is another. – Russian Proverb

From fire to flame. – Russian Proverb

Further from the eye – closer to the heart. – Russian Proverb

Give a naked man a piece of cloth and he will say it is too thick. – Russian Proverb

Give your children too much freedom and you lose your own. – Russian Proverb

Giving gifts to the rich is like pouring water into the sea. – Russian Proverb

Glory lies still; abuse is running. – Russian Proverb

Glowing coals sparkle oft. – Russian Proverb

God bestows no horns upon an ill-tempered cow. – Russian Proverb

God comes with leaden feet but strikes with iron hands. – Russian Proverb

God does not give horns to a cow that likes to gore. – Russian Proverb

God does not give to cow that butts. (Example: Angry men cannot do the mischief they wish)

God does not give to the cow that butts. – Russian Proverb

God doesn’t give more beards than soap. – Russian Proverb

God gave, God took back. – Russian Proverb

God gives to those who get up early. – Russian Proverb
(The person who gets up early to work will be successful; those that arrive early at a place have the advantage over the latecomers)

God gives to those who wake up early. – Russian Proverb

God is always where we don’t look for him. – Russian Proverb

God is far up high, the Tsar is far away. – Russian Proverb

God keeps those safe who keep themselves safe. – Russian Proverb

God marks the crook. – Russian Proverb

God takes care of the one who takes care of himself. – Russian Proverb
(What appears to be cowardice may be wise caution,and what appears to be valour may be foolish rashness; so unnecessary risks should not be run)

God wanted to chastise mankind, so he sent lawyers. – Russian Proverb

God wanted to punish mankind, so he created lawyers. – Russian Proverb

Golden hands, but a wicked mouth. – Russian Proverb

Good brotherhood is the best wealth. – Russian Proverb

Good fortune wears a pretty dress but its underclothes do not bear investigation. – Russian Proverb

Gossip needs no carriage. – Russian Proverb

Guard your honor from your youth, and your weapons once you’ve got them in hand. – Russian Proverb

Habit is a second nature. – Russian Proverb

Habit is a shirt that we wear till death. – Russian Proverb

Hands wash each other. – Russian Proverb – Russian Proverb

Hang a German, even if he is a good man. – Russian Proverb

Happiness is not a horse, you cannot harness it. – Russian Proverb

Haste is good only for catching flies. – Russian Proverb

Have a good time if you want — but don’t overdo it. – Russian Proverb

Having a good wife and rich cabbage soup, seek not other things. – Russian Proverb

Having given your word, be strong; not having done it, try not to promise. – Russian Proverb

He can cheat a fish of its skin. – Russian Proverb

He is dead who is faultless. – Russian Proverb

He lied like an eyewitness. – Russian Proverb

He lived a colonel but died a corpse. – Russian Proverb

He makes the bed soft, yet it’s hard to sleep on. – Russian Proverb

He need not search his pockets for words. – Russian Proverb

He that would learn to pray, let him go to sea. – Russian Proverb

He took the devil’s mat, but he’ll pay back with his skin. – Russian Proverb

He who doesn’t risk never gets to drink champagne. – Russian Proverb

He who is destined for the gallows will not be drowned. – Russian Proverb

He who is frightened of a sparrow will never sow barley. – Russian Proverb

He who offers his back should not complain if it is beaten. – Russian Proverb

He who serves the Tsar cannot serve his people. – Russian Proverb

He would exclaim “Ah” looking at himself. – Russian Proverb
(People are inclined to shut their eyes to their own sins and vices.)

Heart with pepper, soul with garlic. – Russian Proverb

His word is as good as a tied knot. – Russian Proverb

Hold your children with your heart but teach them with your hands. – Russian Proverb

Honor goes to God; the priests get the bacon. – Russian Proverb

Hope for God, but do not be reliant. – Russian Proverb

Hope in the Lord, but exert yourself. – Russian Proverbs

How echo is prompted, it will bounce back. – Russian Proverb

How is prompted, it will bounce back. – Russian Proverb

However much you steal from your state, all the same you won’t get your own back. – Russian Proverb

However much,good you feed the wolf, he still looks at the wood. – Russian Proverb

However muchwould the string wind, the end will be reached anyway. – Russian Proverb

However would the string wind, the end will be reached. – Russian Proverb

However you feed the wolf, he still looks at the wood. – Russian Proverb

Hunger is not your aunt. – Russian Proverb

Hypocrites kick with their hind feet while licking with their tongues. – Russian Proverb

I need not fear my enemies because the most they can do is attack me. I need not fear my friends because the most they can do is betray me. But I have much to fear from people who are indifferent. – Russian Proverb

I sell it for what I bought it. – Russian Proverb

Ice in spring is treacherous; new friendships are seldom sure. – Russian Proverb

Idleness is the mother of all vices. – Russian Proverb
(There is no excuse for doing nothing – when people do not have enough work to do,they into trouble)

If a poor man finds a penny, it is probably a false one. – Russian Proverb

If age and experience came at birth, We would have neither youth nor mirth. – Russian Proverb

If everyone gives one thread, the poor man will have a shirt. – Russian Proverb

If everyone were a gentleman, who would make the mills work? – Russian Proverb

If God listened to every shepherd’s curse, our sheep would all be dead. – Russian Proverb

If God sends you meal, the devil takes the sack. – Russian Proverb

If Jesus Christ comes to help me, I laugh at the angels. – Russian Proverb

If men could foresee the future, they would still behave as they do now. – Russian Proverb

If Moscow is the heart of Russia and St. Petersburg is its head, then Kiev is its mother. – Russian Proverb

If mushrooms grew in the mouth, that would be not mouth but kitchen garden. – Russian Proverb

If not by washing, then by rolling. – Russian Proverb

If one hand were the other they would both want to be clean. – Russian Proverb

If rubles fell from heaven the poor would have no bag. – Russian Proverb

If the child does not cry, the mother won’t know what it wants. – Russian Proverb

If the collective farm is wealthy, the farmer is happy. – Russian Proverb

If the devil catch a man idle he’ll set him at work. – Russian Proverb

If the doctor cures, the sun sees it; but if he kills, the earth hides it. – Russian Proverb

If the family is together, the soul is in the right place. – Russian Proverb

If the fool has a hunchback no one remarks about it; if a wise man has a boil everybody talks about it. – Russian Proverb

If the peasant doesn’t hear the thunder he won’t make the sign of the cross. – Russian Proverb

If the pocket is empty, the judge is deaf. – Russian Proverb

If the thunder is not loud, the peasant forgets to cross himself. – Russian Proverb

If there is no apple one eats a little carrot. – Russian Proverb

If there is no caviar one eats porridge. – Russian Proverb

If you are a host to your guest, be a host to his dog as well. – Russian Proverb

If you are afraid of the wolves, do not go to the woods. – Russian Proverb

If you are going to do something carelessly, it is better to give it up entirely. – Russian Proverb

If you called yourself a milk-mushroom-get into the basket!. – Russian Proverb

If you chase two rabbits, you will not catch either one. – Russian Proverb

If you didn’t catch anything when fishing, then a crab is a fish. – Russian Proverb

If you do not strike back at him who hits you, there is no way for him to find out whether you also have hands. – Russian Proverb

If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten. – Russian Proverb

If you don’t crack the shell, you can’t eat the nut. – Russian Proverb

If you don’t deceive, you can’t sell. – Russian Proverb

If you don’t have a hundred rubles, make sure you have a hundred friends. – Russian Proverb

If you don’t have time to do it right you must have time to do it over. – Russian Proverb

If you enjoy riding, enjoy pulling the sleigh. – Russian Proverb

If you enjoy riding, you better enjoy pulling the sleigh. – Russian Proverb

If you feel an urge to work, take a nap, and it will pass. – Russian Proverb

If you flatter the mother, you will embrace the daughter. – Russian Proverb

If you follow god, you won’t find anything. – Russian Proverb

If you go to war pray once; if you go on a sea journey pray twice; but pray three times when you are going to be married. – Russian Proverb

If you have eaten the morsel on Wednesday, do not look for it on Thursday. – Russian Proverb

If you learn a lot, you’ll age soon. – Russian Proverb

If you make a fool to pray to God, he will hurt forehead. – Russian Proverb

If you rely on god, you won’t fail. – Russian Proverb

If you rush things, you’ll just make others laugh. – Russian Proverb

If you start chasing two hares, you will catch none. – Russian Proverb

If you take it together, it will not be heavy. – Russian Proverb

If you talk to an official you must talk rubles. – Russian Proverb

If you throw nettles into your neighbors garden you will find them growing in your own. – Russian Proverb

If you want to be a hundred you must start young. – Russian Proverb

If you were born lucky, even your rooster will lay eggs. – Russian Proverb

If you will not hear reason, she will surely rap your knuckles. – Russian Proverb

If your face looks skewed, don’t blame the mirror. – Russian Proverb

If your face skewed, don’t blame the mirror. – Russian Proverb

If your heart is a rose, then your mouth will speak perfumed words. – Russian Proverb

If you’re afraid of wolves, don’t go to the woods. – Russian Proverb

In a crush, yet without resentment. – Russian Proverb

In a deal there are two fools: the one who asks too much and the one who asks too little. – Russian Proverb

In a fight the rich man tries to save his face, the poor man his coat. – Russian Proverb

In a quarrel, leave room for reconciliation. – Russian Proverb

In a rickety stable the cow produces no milk. – Russian Proverb

In affect you can break even an elm. – Russian Proverb

In other persons’ eye one can see a mote, in one’s own – cannot see a log. – Russian Proverb

In Russia every day is of thirty hours. – Russian Proverb

In the garden of time grows the flower of consolation. – Russian Proverb

In the kingdom of hope, there is no winter. – Russian Proverb

In the lake of lies there are many dead fish. – Russian Proverb

In the land of hope, there is never any winter. – Russian Proverb

In the times of czar Goroch. – Russian Proverb

Intoxication is not the wine’s fault but man’s. – Russian Proverb

Invite a peasant to your table and he’ll put his feet on it. – Russian Proverb

It is a bad workman that has a bad saw. – Russian Proverb
(A careless or unskilled person blames his tools to excuse himself for bad work, while it is his own carelessness or lack of skill which is really to blame)

It is better to have a small fish than a big cockroach. – Russian Proverb

It is bread that keeps one warm, not fur. – Russian Proverb

It is easier for the horse when a woman gets off the cart. – Russian Proverb

It is easier to bear a child once a year than to shave every day. – Russian Proverb

It is easier to bear a child once a year than to shave everyday. – Russian Proverbs

It is easier to fill bellies than one pair of the eyes. – Russian Proverb

It is easier to fill twenty bellies than one pair of eyes. – Russian Proverb

It is easy to undress the naked. – Russian Proverb

It is good to be visiting, but it is better to be at home. – Russian Proverb

It is good to be visiting, but it is better at home. – Russian Proverb
(Your home (i.e. your house,your home town,etc.) is where you are likely to be happiest, especially in comparison with other places you may be at the time)

It is good to pay with other people’s money. – Russian Proverb

It is never winter in the land of hope. – Russian Proverb

It is not the horse that draws the cart, but the oats. – Russian Proverb

It is unpleasant to go alone, even to be drowned. – Russian Proverb

It is wanted and repellent. – Russian Proverb

It makes chicken laugh. – Russian Proverb

It takes all kinds of trees to make a forest. – Russian Proverb

It was smooth on paper, but forgotten about ravines. – Russian Proverb

It was smooth on paper, but we’ve forgotten about ravines. – Russian Proverb

It will heal well before your wedding. – Russian Proverb

It will last out our time; if after us no grass grows, what does it matter to us? – Russian Proverb

It will snap where it’s the thinnest. – Russian Proverb

It’s a crime if you get caught. – Russian Proverb

It’s better to be a cripple than always sitting down. – Russian Proverb

It’s better to be known as a rascal than a fool. – Russian Proverb

It’s better to be too aware than too unaware. – Russian Proverb

It’s better to see once than hear a hundred times. – Russian Proverb

It’s easier to tear a hole than to mend one. – Russian Proverb

It’s nice to have a spoon in time for dinner. – Russian Proverb

It’s the still waters that are inhibited by devils. – Russian Proverb

Jabber, Emelya – your week. – Russian Proverb

Jesus Christ was crucified by public opinion. – Russian Proverb

Judges and physicians kill with impunity. – Russian Proverb

Keep your ears wider and your mouth narrower. – Russian Proverb

Keep your eye on the ball. – Russian Proverb

Know friend when trouble. – Russian Proverb

Law is a flag and gold is the wind that makes it wave. – Russian Proverb

Law is like a shaft of a cart, it points wherever you turn it to. – Russian Proverb

Laws are silent in time of war. – Russian Proverb

Lenin’s science strengthens the mind and the hands. – Russian Proverb

Lenin’s truth makes great strides all around the world. – Russian Proverb

Let everyone pick his own nose. – Russian Proverb

Lie, but don’t overdo it. – Russian Proverb

Life is short, but there’s a lot to be done. – Russian Proverb

Like priest, like church. – Russian Proverb

Like two drops of water. – Russian Proverb

Live and scratch — when you’re dead the itching will stop. – Russian Proverb

Live for a century – learn for a century. – Russian Proverb

Living life is not like crossing a meadow. – Russian Proverb

Living life is not like just crossing a field. – Russian Proverb

Living mindlessly is paradise. – Russian Proverb

Living your life is not like crossing a meadow. – Russian Proverb

Long whiskers cannot take the place of brains. – Russian Proverb

Look for wind in a field. – Russian Proverb

Looking at a tree see its fruit; looking at a man see his deeds. – Russian Proverb

Loose words are picked up like gold coin. – Russian Proverb

Love and eggs are best when they are fresh. – Russian Proverb

Love has its own language, but marriage falls back on the local dialect. – Russian Proverb

Love is like a glass that breaks if handled clumsily. – Russian Proverb

Love makes the owl seem prettier than a white falcon. – Russian Proverb

Make a friend of the wolf, but keep your axe ready. – Russian Proverb

Make peace with man and war with your sins. – Russian Proverb

Make peace with people; wage war with your sins. – Russian Proverb

Make thyself a sheep, and the wolf is ready. – Russian Proverb

Make yourself a sheep and the wolf is ready. – Russian Proverb

Makes the bed soft, yet hard to sleep. – Russian Proverb

Many people who have gold in the house are looking for copper outside. – Russian Proverb

Many who have gold in the house are looking for copper outside. – Russian Proverb

Mass is not repeated for the deaf. – Russian Proverb

Masters are fighting, servants’ forelocks are creaking. – Russian Proverb

Meanness looks through one eye only, ambition is blind. – Russian Proverb

Measure thy cloth ten times, thou canst cut it but once. – Russian Proverb

Men who watch their fortune grow find their houses too small. – Russian Proverb

Men will not be fortunate without a helping hand from misfortune. – Russian Proverb

Messengers should be neither beheaded nor hanged. – Russian Proverb

Misfortune does not visit the weak-hearted. – Russian Proverb

Mistrust is an axe in the tree of love. – Russian Proverb

Mock not the fallen, for slippery is the road ahead of you. – Russian Proverb

Mocking is catching. – Russian Proverb

Money is like down — one puff and it’s gone. – Russian Proverb

Money is only good for a weekday, a holiday, and a rainy day. – Russian Proverb

Moscow does not believe in tears. – Russian Proverb

Much noise from nothing. – Russian Proverb

Mute as a fish. – Russian Proverb

My job ‘cock-a-doodle-doo’; from then on, it may not dawn. – Russian Proverb

My job is to scream, ‘cock-a-doodle-doo’; from then on, it may not dawn. – Russian Proverb

Near is my shirt, but nearer is my skin. – Russian Proverb

Neither fish nor meat. – Russian Proverb

Neither rhyme nor harmony. – Russian Proverb

Never kiss an opportunity with a dirty mouth. – Russian Proverb

No apple tree is immune from worms. – Russian Proverb

No family has no ugly member. – Russian Proverb

No man can be a good ruler unless he has first been ruled. – Russian Proverb

No matter how much you feed a wolf, he will always return to the forest. – Russian Proverb

No money is taken for just looking at somebody or something. – Russian Proverb
(There is nothing to prevent an ordinary person from l looking at a person of great importance so long as he tries to do no harm)

No money is taken for just looking. – Russian Proverb

No one can take two skins from one ox. – Russian Proverb

No one is dragged to heaven by the hair. – Russian Proverb

No one is hanged who has money in his pocket. – Russian Proverb

No one knows how the poor man dines. – Russian Proverb

No year has two summers. – Russian Proverb

Nobody goes to another monastery with one’s own charter. – Russian Proverb

Nobody goes to Tula with one’s own samovar. – Russian Proverb

Nosy Barbara’s nose was torn off at the market. – Russian Proverb

Not all who make love make marriages. – Russian Proverb

Not every glittering thing is gold. – Russian Proverb

Not everyone who has a cowl on is a monk. – Russian Proverb
(Do not judge people by what they appear to be)

Not everything is a mermaid that dives into the water. – Russian Proverb

Not for village, not for town. – Russian Proverb

Nothing is worse than waiting or chasing. – Russian Proverb

Old age is not a blessing. – Russian Proverb

Old age is not a joy, but death is not a gain. – Russian Proverb

On a fishing lull, even a crayfish is fish. – Russian Proverb

On an empty belly every burden is heavy. – Russian Proverb

Once burned by milk you will blow on cold water. – Russian Proverb
(After some bitter or painful experience you will be on your guard against similar troubles our sufferings)

Once it flies out, you can’t catch it. – Russian Proverb

Once you have fallen into the water, you’re not scared of water any more. – Russian Proverb

One can even get used to living hell. – Russian Proverb

One can get sick of cake, but never of bread. – Russian Proverb

One cannot make a fur coat from a “Thank you.” – Russian Proverb

One can’t break an axe with a whip. – Russian Proverb

One can’t spoil porridge with butter. – Russian Proverb

One day before you is better than ten years behind you. – Russian Proverbs

One does not go to Tula with one’s own samovar. – Russian Proverb
(Tula-Russia city. Do not do anything that is completely unnecessary; do not take supplies, articles, etc., to a place where are plenty of them already)

“Your feet are crooked, your hair is good for nothing,” said the pig to the horse. – Russian Proverb

One does not look for good from good. – Russian Proverb
(By continually striving for the best one way waste good opportunities)

One does not look for good when he is well. – Russian Proverb

One does not regret giving one’s own ear-ring to one’s dear friend. – Russian Proverb
(One does not regret giving the best to one’s friend)

One does not sharpen the axes after the right time; after the time they are needed. – Russian Proverb
(It is useless to have something when there is no use for it)

One does not wash one’s dirty linen in public. – Russian Proverb

One doesn’t bring samovars to Tula. – Russian Proverb

One fisherman recognizes another from afar. – Russian Proverb

One fisherman sees another from afar. – Russian Proverb
(People of similar interests,tastes or characters are attracted to each other and stay close together)

One good daughter is worth seven sons. – Russian Proverb

One is not a thief unless caught stealing. – Russian Proverb

One is one’s own master on one’s own stove. – Russian Proverb
(An Englishman can do as he likes in his own home and nobody may enter it without his permissions)

One is received according to one’s dress and sent off according to one’s wit. – Russian Proverb

One is wiser in the morning than in the evening. – Russian Proverb

One man in a field is not a warrior. – Russian Proverb

One may make up a soft bed for somebody, but still it will be hard to sleep in. – Russian Proverb
(One should beware of an attractive offer, for there is very likely)

One may make up a soft bed, but still it will be hard to sleep in. – Russian Proverb

One naturally prefers one’s own kind. – Russian Proverb

One never tires working for oneself. – Russian Proverb

One road for the fugitive and a hundred for the pursuer. – Russian Proverb

One rotten beam can make a whole house collapse. – Russian Proverb

One son is no son, two sons is no son, but three sons is a son. – Russian Proverb

One sprinkles the most sugar where the tart is burnt. – Russian Proverb

One stupid woman recognizes another one from a distance. – Russian Proverb

One who seeks no friends is his own enemy. – Russian Proverb

One who sits between two chairs may easily fall down. – Russian Proverb
(A person who cannot decide which of two courses to follow, who tries to follow two courses at the same time,may fail to follow either)

One with a plow – seven with a spoon. – Russian Proverb

One would like to eat fish, but would not like to get into the water. – Russian Proverb
(Said of a person who is anxious to obtain something valuable but does not want to take the necessary trouble or risk)

One would like to eat honey, but would not like to get stung. – Russian Proverb

Onion treats seven ailments. – Russian Proverb
(If person eats an onion every day,he will remain healthy and not need a doctor)

Only a fool will make a doctor his heir. – Russian Proverb

Only chained bears dance. – Russian Proverb

Only death will cure the hunchback. – Russian Proverb

Only he who does nothing makes no mistakes. – Russian Proverb

Other people’s money has sharp teeth. – Russian Proverb

Our eyes are our enemies. – Russian Proverb

Out of eyesight – out of heart. – Russian Proverb

Overseas, a cow a quarter of kopeck, but a rouble to ship. – Russian Proverb

Overseas, a cow costs a quarter of kopeck, but it will cost a rouble to ship it here. – Russian Proverb

Paper is patient – you can put anything on it. – Russian Proverb

Partnership is an invention of the devil. – Russian Proverb

Peace and harmony is great treasure. – Russian Proverb

Peace lasts till the army comes, and the army lasts till peace comes. – Russian Proverb

Peace lasts until the army comes, and the army lasts until peace comes. – Russian Proverb

Plan your life as though you were going to live forever, but live today as if you were going to die tomorrow. – Russian Proverb

Politics is a rotten egg; if broken, it stinks. – Russian Proverbs

Poverty is a sin that the rich never forgive. – Russian Proverb

Poverty is crafty. – Russian Proverb

Poverty is not a sin, it’s worse than that. – Russian Proverb

Praise a fair day at night. – Russian Proverb

Pray for revenge, and God will turn a deaf ear. – Russian Proverb

Pray to God but continue to row to the shore. – Russian Proverb

Pray to God, but be level-headed. – Russian Proverb

Pray to God, but continue rowing towards the shore.– Russian Proverb

Pray to God, but keep on rowing to the shore. – Russian Proverb

Pray to God, but keep rowing to the shore. – Russian Proverb

Praying kneads no dough. – Russian Proverb

Proverbs are the people’s wisdom. – Russian Proverb

Pull out the beak and the tail gets stuck, pull out the tail and the beak gets stuck. – Russian Proverb

Rain falls alike on the just and the unjust. – Russian Proverb

Rather a bitter truth than a sweet lie. – Russian Proverb

Regretting the past is like chasing after the wind. – Russian Proverb

Reperition is a mother of learning. – Russian Proverb

Ride slower – get further. – Russian Proverb

Ride slower – you’ll get further. – Russian Proverb

Rooster today, feather duster tomorrow. – Russian Proverb

Rotten straw can harm a healthy horse. – Russian Proverb

Running away is not glorious, but often very healthy. – Russian Proverb

Russia was tsarist – became proletarian. – Russian Proverb

Seeing the Kremlin stars – going forward braver. – Russian Proverb

Seek the brave in prison and the stupid among the clergy. – Russian Proverb

Seven don’t wait for one. – Russian Proverb

Seven nannies make a one-eyed kid. – Russian Proverb

Seven people don’t wait for one. – Russian Proverb

Shame is worse than death. – Russian Proverb

Shoot a daw and a crow, and soon you’ll hit a falcon. – Russian Proverb

Single man in a field is not a warrior. – Russian Proverb

Sit a beggar at your table and he will soon put his feet on it. – Russian Proverbs

Small children give you headache; big children give you heartache. – Russian Proverb

Small children give you headache; big children heartache. – Russian Proverbs

Small choice in rotten apples. – Russian Proverb

Small faults indulged in are little thieves that let in greater. – Russian Proverb

Small gifts go to places where men expect bigger ones. – Russian Proverb

Smooth hands love the labor of others. – Russian Proverb

So the man, so his shadow. – Russian Proverb

Soap is grey but it used to be white. – Russian Proverb

Some people are masters of money, and some its slaves. – Russian Proverbs

Some people are masters of money, and some people are slaves of it. – Russian Proverb

Something well cared for lasts two centuries. – Russian Proverb

Sorrow doesn’t kill, but it blights. – Russian Proverb

Spending is quick, earning is slow. – Russian Proverb

Spent as earned. – Russian Proverb

Still water undermines the bank. – Russian Proverb

Still waters are inhibited by devils. – Russian Proverb

Stormy weather cannot stay all the time, the red sun will come out, too. – Russian Proverb
(Things are at their worst just before they get better, or the worst stage is often the prelude to an improvement)

Stretch your legs according to your clothes. – Russian Proverb
(One should remain within the limits of what one has or what one can afford)

Strike while the iron is hot. – Russian Proverb

Success and rest don’t sleep together. – Russian Proverb

Success consecrates the foulest crimes. – Russian Proverb

Success has many fathers, while failure is an orphan. – Russian Proverb

Take a man at his word, an ox by the horns. – Russian Proverb

Take care of clothes since they are new, take care of your honor since you are young. – Russian Proverb

Take care of your dress from when it’s new and your honor from your youth. – Russian Proverb

Take the bull by the horns. – Russian Proverb
(You should deal with something difficult boldly without delay)

Take the goods the gods provide. – Russian Proverb

Take thy thoughts to bed with thee, for the morning is wiser than the evening. – Russian Proverbs

Take time to smell the roses. – Russian Proverb

Take time when time is, for time will away. – Russian Proverb

Take together, it will not be heavy. – Russian Proverb

Tastes are not argued. – Russian Proverb

Tears come more often from the eyes than from the heart. – Russian Proverb

Tell God the truth, but give money to the judge. – Russian Proverb

Tell God the truth, but give the judge money. – Russian Proverb

Tell lies, but become not tangled in lies. – Russian Proverb

Tell me who your friends are and i’ll tell you who you are. – Russian Proverb

Tell me who’s your friend and I’ll tell you who you are. – Russian Proverb

Thanks to one small candle the whole of Moscow burns. – Russian Proverb

That’s the snag!. – Russian Proverb

That’s where the dog is buried. – Russian Proverb

That’s, Grandma, the Yuri’s Day. – Russian Proverb

The appetite comes during a meal. – Russian Proverb
(Desire or facility increases as an activity proceeds)

The appetite comes with eating. – Russian Proverb

The apple doesn’t fall far away from the apple-tree. – Russian Proverb

The bear dances but the tamer collects the money. – Russian Proverb

The beautiful is less what one sees than what one dreams. – Russian Proverb

The belly is like a judge that is silent yet still asks questions. – Russian Proverb

The blind cannot see — the proud will not. – Russian Proverb

The boss is always right. – Russian Proverb

The calmer you go, the further along you will be. – Russian Proverb

The cart is still there. – Russian Proverb

The casket opened in a simple way. – Russian Proverb

The casket opened simple. – Russian Proverb

The castle gates will always open for gold-laden donkeys. – Russian Proverb

The cat knows who’s meat it has eaten. – Russian Proverb

The cat with cream on her whiskers should have a good excuse ready. – Russian Proverb

The church is near but the road is icy; the bar is far away but I’ll walk carefully. – Russian Proverbs

The coat is quite new, only the holes are old. – Russian Proverb

The crow flew over the sea but returned still a crow. – Russian Proverb

The cub does not teach the Wolf. – Russian Proverb

The devil is not as scary as they paint him. – Russian Proverb

The devil is not so frightful as he is painted. – Russian Proverb
(Any person of bad character is not so bad as people say he is )

The devil is not so frightful as he is painted. – Russian Proverb

The dog learns to swim when the water reaches his ears. – Russian Proverb

The elbow is near, but try and bite it. – Russian Proverb

The empty vessel makes the greatest sound. – Russian Proverb

The end is the crown of any work. – Russian Proverb
(It is the final result than completes all that went before and is its culmination; it is the final result than matters)

The fall of a leaf is a whisper to the living. – Russian Proverb

The fall of the leaf; is a whisper to the living. – Russian Proverb

The fathers ate the cranberries and the children are left with the aftertaste. – Russian Proverb

The first [cup of vodka] goes as a stake, the second as a falcon, and the third as a little bird. – Russian Proverb

The first blin always turns out lumpy. – Russian Proverb

The first goes as a stake, the second as a falcon, and the third as a little bird. – Russian Proverb

The first pancake is a blob. – Russian Proverb

The first pancake is always a failure. – Russian Proverb

The first snow does not mean winter, nor the first love marriage. – Russian Proverb

The fish always stinks from the head downwards. – Russian Proverb

The future is for those who know how to wait. – Russian Proverb

The greatest king must at last be put to bed with a shovel. – Russian Proverb

The hammer shatters glass but hardens steel. – Russian Proverb

The hearth in our house is warmer than our neighbor’s. – Russian Proverb

The horse loves oats; the earth, manure; and the governor, tribute. – Russian Proverb

The horse may run quickly, but it can’t escape its own tail. – Russian Proverb

The horses of hope gallop, but the asses of experience go slowly. – Russian Proverb

The lambskin is not worth the currying. – Russian Proverb

The less you know, the more soundly you sleep. – Russian Proverb

The lonely person is at home everywhere. – Russian Proverb

The lucky man’s enemy dies, and the unlucky man’s friend. – Russian Proverb

The man is the flame, the woman the glow. – Russian Proverb

The moon gives us light but no heat. – Russian Proverb

The more you know the less will you sleep. – Russian Proverb

The morning is wiser than the evening. – Russian Proverbs

The morning sun never lasts a day. – Russian Proverb

The naked don’t fear robbery. – Russian Proverb

The newborn baby yells; you die in silence. – Russian Proverb

The night walks the same road as the dream. – Russian Proverb

The nights are short for him who married late in life. – Russian Proverb

The night’s too short to warrant marrying poor. – Russian Proverb

The noblemen’s quarrels can be read on the backs of the peasants. – Russian Proverb

The offender never forgives. – Russian Proverb

The old bear falls into the old trap. – Russian Proverb

The one who draws (a cart) is urged on. – Russian Proverb
(A man willing to work is always given more work to do than a lazy one,because the work which given to willing man will be done well and quickly)

The one who draws the cart is urged on. – Russian Proverb

The one who pulls a cart is urged on. – Russian Proverb

The past is for God, the future for the Tsars. – Russian Proverb

The payment adorns the debt. – Russian Proverb – Russian Proverb

The peasant sweats and the nobleman is always right. – Russian Proverb

The peasant will not cross himself before it begins to thunder. – Russian Proverb
(Do not do at the last moment anything that was to be done long before.Do not put things off until the last moment)

The person afraid of bad luck will never know good. – Russian Proverb

The poorer, the more generous. – Russian Proverb

The reserve doesn’t weight your pocket. – Russian Proverb

The rich would have to eat money if the poor did not provide food. – Russian Proverb

The riches that are in the heart cannot be stolen. – Russian Proverb

The river is flat but the banks are steep. – Russian Proverb

The river’s reputation ends where the sea begins. – Russian Proverb

The same hammer that breaks the glass forges the steel. – Russian Proverb

The sat one doesn’t understand the hungry one: for one the soup is too thin, for the other – the pearls are too small. – Russian Proverb

The scythe has hit a stone. – Russian Proverb

The scythe ran into a stone. – Russian Proverb
(Said of meeting of two persons who are a match for each other in cunning or power)

The shovel insults the poker. – Russian Proverb

The slower you go, the farther you will be. – Russian Proverb

The sluggard will not plough by reason of the cold; therefore shall he beg in harvest, and have nothing. – Russian Proverb

The sober man’s secret is the drunkard’s speech. – Russian Proverb

The sooner you get in, the sooner you get out. – Russian Proverb

The stargazer’s toe is often stubbed. – Russian Proverb

The sun will shine into our yard too. – Russian Proverb
(Neither the weather nor people can remain disturbed for long;the calm(sun) must follow)

The sythe ran into a stone. – Russian Proverb

The tallest blade of grass is the first to be cut by the scythe. – Russian Proverb

The tallest tree is rooted in the ground. – Russian Proverb

The tears of strangers are only water. – Russian Proverb

The teeth are not match for the nut. – Russian Proverb

The thief has a chicken’s heart — he sleeps in fear. – Russian Proverb

The thief makes perhaps one mistake; those he stole from made a hundred. – Russian Proverb

The toe of the star-gazer is often stubbed. – Russian Proverb

The tongue always returns to the sore tooth. – Russian Proverb

The tongue speaks, but the head doesn’t know. – Russian Proverb
(Foolish and vain people are very fond of expressing their own opinions and talking too much)

The Tsar has three hands but only one ear. – Russian Proverb

The vulture embraced the chicken until its last breath. – Russian Proverb

The whole Soviet country is visible from the Kremlin. – Russian Proverb

The wife is twice precious only; when led into the house, and when taken out. – Russian Proverb

The wise man boasts of his goods and wares; the foolish one of his young wife. – Russian Proverb

The wise man says “I am looking for truth”; and the fool, “I have found truth.” – Russian Proverb

The wolf can always be hired very cheap as a shepherd. – Russian Proverb

The wolf is not afraid of the sheepdog, but he is of his chain. – Russian Proverb

The wolf will hire himself out very cheaply as a shepherd. – Russian Proverb

The woman had no problems so she bought some pigs. – Russian Proverb

The word is silver, the silence is gold. – Russian Proverb

The young lobster learns his manner of walking from the old lobster. – Russian Proverbs

There are many fathers, but only one mother. – Russian Proverb

There are more whores in hiding than there are public ones. – Russian Proverb

There are no bad ships at all, there are bad captains. – Russian Proverb

There are only two types of Chinese — those who give bribes and those who take them. – Russian Proverbs

There are two kinds of Chinese: those who give wine and those who drink it. – Russian Proverb

There is more light than can be seen through the window. – Russian Proverb

There is no evil without good. – Russian Proverb
(In every trouble and difficulty there is hope or expectation of an improvement in the circumstances; a misfortune may turn into a benefit)

There is no honor when there is nothing to eat. – Russian Proverb

There is no law written for fools. – Russian Proverb

There is no repentance after death. – Russian Proverb

There is no shame in not knowing — the shame lies in not finding out. – Russian Proverb

There is no smoke without fire. – Russian Proverb

There is nothing better than a rich wife and a generous mother-in-law. – Russian Proverb

There is only one good – knowledge; there is only one evil – ignorance. – Russian Proverb

There is plenty of sound in an empty barrel. – Russian Proverb

There may be deep bottoms in still waters. – Russian Proverb

There may be snow on the roof, but there’s fire in the belly. – Russian Proverb

There was – there wasn’t. – Russian Proverb

There was a time they loved an accordionist, and now the time has come where they love a tractor driver. – Russian Proverb

There were people before us and there will be people after us. – Russian Proverb

There will be trouble if the cobbler starts making pies. – Russian Proverb
(A person should concern himself with his own trade or occupation and should not engage in, or give advice about, other trades or occupations)

There will come a time when the seed will sprout. – Russian Proverb
(Do not trouble yourself about future problems and difficulties, but wait till you have to deal with them; then will be the time to worry about them,not now)

There would be no good fortune had misfortune not helped. – Russian Proverb

There’s no bad without the good. – Russian Proverb

There’s no harm in wine, it’s drunkenness that is at fault. – Russian Proverb

They bow to you when borrowing, you bow to them when collecting. – Russian Proverb

They come into the courtroom in a suit and leave with no trousers. – Russian Proverb

They don’t hit you in the nose for asking. – Russian Proverb

They don’t swing fists when the fight is over. – Russian Proverb

They use a wedge to knock out a wedge. – Russian Proverb

They wait three years for what was promised. – Russian Proverb

Those that are afraid of bad luck will never know good. – Russian Proverb

Those who are discontent to remain in one place will not earn much. – Russian Proverb

Those who love you will make you weep; those who hate you will make you laugh. – Russian Proverb

Thread off the world – shirt for naked. – Russian Proverb

Time best healer. – Russian Proverb

Time makes the best healer. – Russian Proverb

To ask is no sin, and to be refused is no calamity. – Russian Proverb

To become a master or a deadman. – Russian Proverb

To every high mountain, there is a higher one. – Russian Proverb

To keep a new friend, never break with the old. – Russian Proverb

To know that candles are expensive is of no value to the blind man. – Russian Proverb

To live is well, but to live well is better. – Russian Proverb

To live with wolves, you have to howl like a wolf. – Russian Proverb

To run away is not glorious, but very healthy. – Russian Proverb

To us – in the tanks, going back – on the sleds. – Russian Proverb

Together, it’s cramped; apart, it’s boring. – Russian Proverb

Trouble is here, so open the gates. – Russian Proverb

Trouble is the beginning of disaster. – Russian Proverb

Trouble never comes alone. – Russian Proverb

Trust in God but lock your doors. – Russian Proverb

Trust in God, but mind your own business. – Russian Proverb

Trust, but verify. – Russian Proverb

Truth does not need many words. – Russian Proverb

Two bears don’t live in one cave. – Russian Proverb

Two boots make a pair. – Russian Proverb

Two communists lead three hundred unaffiliated. – Russian Proverb

Two hands upon the breast, and labour is past. – Russian Proverb

Unless the thunder strikes, a man won’t cross himself. – Russian Proverb

Until you have smoked out the bees, you can’t eat the honey. – Russian Proverb

USSR – an example for all. – Russian Proverb

Visiting is good, but home is better. – Russian Proverb

Vixen resolved not to steal chicken. – Russian Proverb

Vodka is the aunt of wine. – Russian Proverb

Vows made in storms are forgotten in calms. – Russian Proverb

Wait three years for promised. – Russian Proverb

Warm a frozen snake and it will be the first to bite you. – Russian Proverb

Water does not run under a lying stone. – Russian Proverb

Water never loses its way. – Russian Proverb

We all see the same sun, but we don’t eat the same meal. – Russian Proverb

We do not care of what we have, but we cry when it is lost. – Russian Proverb
(We do not appreciate the value of a thing until we have lost it)

We use to live and spill tears, now we live and build happiness. – Russian Proverb

Went to get wool, but returned bald. – Russian Proverb

What boy one begs for, the man throws away. – Russian Proverb

What comes out of one mouth goes into a hundred others. – Russian Proverb

What go looking for, will find. – Russian Proverb

What johnny will not teach himself, johnny will never know. – Russian Proverb

What makes you happy, makes you rich. – Russian Proverb

What men usually ask for when they pray to God is, that two and two may not make four. – Russian Proverb

What plant, that will harvest. – Russian Proverb

What the heart doesn’t see, the eye will not see either. – Russian Proverb

What the young one begs for, the grown-up throws away. – Russian Proverb

What was written by a pen, cannot be taken out with an axe. – Russian Proverb

What you go looking for, you will find. – Russian Proverb

What you plant, that you will harvest. – Russian Proverb

When a girl is born all four walls weep. – Russian Proverb

When a needle sees a dagger, she cries “O sister!” – Russian Proverb

When Anger and Revenge get married, their daughter is called Cruelty. – Russian Proverb

When death is there, dying is over. – Russian Proverb

When god will punish, he will first take away the understanding. – Russian Proverb

When gold speaks, everything else is silent. – Russian Proverb

When he mounts his horse he forgets God; when he dismounts, he forgets his horse. – Russian Proverb

When masters are fighting, their servants’ forelocks are creaking. – Russian Proverb

When misers die, children open up their coffers. – Russian Proverb

When money speaks the truth is silent. – Russian Proverb

When money speaks, the truth keeps silent. – Russian Proverb

When money talks, the truth is silent. – Russian Proverb

When money talks, then truth stays silent. – Russian Proverb

When necessity speaks, it demands. – Russian Proverb

When night falls the face of the wolf lights up. – Russian Proverb

When the Czar has a cold all Russia coughs. – Russian Proverb

When the fight’s over, don’t wave your fists. – Russian Proverb

When the task accomplished, feel free to take a walk. – Russian Proverb

When the Tsar sins the Empire must do penance. – Russian Proverb

When the wine is run out, you stop the leak. – Russian Proverb

When we sing everybody hears us, when we sigh nobody hears us. – Russian Proverbs

When wood is chopped, wood chips will fly. – Russian Proverb

When you are in a pack of hounds, you either bark or wag your tail. – Russian Proverb

When you live next to the cemetery you cannot weep for everyone. – Russian Proverb

When you meet a man judge him by his clothes, when you leave a man judge him by his heart. – Russian Proverb

When you meet a man, you judge him by his clothes; when you leave, you judge him by his heart. – Russian Proverb

Where necessity speaks it demands. – Russian Proverb

Where something is thin, that’s where it tears. – Russian Proverb
(Each person or feature in an enterprise or process must be equally reliable; an enterprise or process may fail because of a single weakness or fault)

Where you saw wood, there the sawdust will fall. – Russian Proverb

Whether an owl with a stump, or a stump with an owl. – Russian Proverb

Whether you hit an owl with a stump, or a stump with an owl. – Russian Proverb

Who drinks till bottom, lives without mind. – Russian Proverb

Who falls in the water will hold on to the foam to save himself. – Russian Proverb

Who have not been there – he will be, who have been – will not forget. – Russian Proverb

Who is brave eats two. – Russian Proverb

Who lives in exile finds that spring has no charm. – Russian Proverb

Who owns the bank owns the fish. – Russian Proverb

Who reminds old, will be deprived of his eye. – Russian Proverb

Who talks little hears better. – Russian Proverb

Who wants heat, must endure the smoke. – Russian Proverb

Who wasn’t [out] in the sea, didn’t pray to God. – Russian Proverb

Who wasn’t out in the sea, didn’t pray to God. – Russian Proverb

Whoever wants honey must breed bees. – Russian Proverb

Why marry, when your neighbor’s wife is ready to go to bed with you? – Russian Proverb

Wild ducks and tomorrow both come without calling. – Russian Proverb

Will heal before wedding. – Russian Proverb

Wine bears no blame — only the drunkard. – Russian Proverb

Wisdom is born; stupidity is learned. – Russian Proverb

With a piece of bread in your hand you’ll find paradise under a pine tree. – Russian Proverb

With lies you may go ahead in the world–but you can never go back. – Russian Proverb

With seven nurses the child loses its eye. – Russian Proverb

Without a cat mice have no restrictions. – Russian Proverb

Without a fertilizer, there couldn’t be any plants. – Russian Proverb

Without stooping down for the mushroom, you cannot put it in your basket. – Russian Proverb

Without the shepherd, sheep are not a flock. – Russian Proverb

Wolf in sheep’s clothing. – Russian Proverb

Word is not a sparrow: flies out, can’t catch it. – Russian Proverb

Work is afraid of a skilled worker. – Russian Proverb

Work is unlike wolf; it won’t run to the woods. – Russian Proverb

Work makes you into a hunchback and then rich. – Russian Proverb

Worship the gods of where you live. – Russian Proverb

Would I know where I’d fall, I’d lay some straw there ahead of time. – Russian Proverb

Yakov’s magpie started chattering the same thing about anyone. – Russian Proverb

You can bend an alder-tree, if you do it gradually. – Russian Proverb

You can best shoot an eagle with an arrow made from its own feathers. – Russian Proverb

You can get used to anything — even hell. – Russian Proverb

You can get used to anything—even hell. – Russian Proverbs

You can not write in the chimney with charcoal. – Russian Proverb

You cannot break a wall with your forehead. – Russian Proverb

You cannot break through a wall with your forehead. – Russian Proverb
(It is often wise to give way to the wishes off others; for to oppose them might bring ruin upon oneself)

You cannot build a wall with one stone. – Russian Proverb

You cannot buy wisdom abroad if there is none at home. – Russian Proverb

You cannot drive straight on a twisting lane. – Russian Proverb

You cannot hang everything on a single peg. – Russian Proverb

You cannot jump higher than your head. – Russian Proverb

You cannot make a soft bed for everyone. – Russian Proverb

You cannot please everybody. – Russian Proverb

You cannot pull a fish out of the pond without work. – Russian Proverb
(Restraint and caution achieve nothing; if you want to get something,you should immediately start working for it)

You cannot ride two horses with one ass. – Russian Proverb

You cannot sew buttons on your neighbor’s mouth. – Russian Proverb

You cannot throw a word out of a song. – Russian Proverb

You can’t do everything at once. – Russian Proverb

You can’t drive straight on a twisting lane. – Russian Proverb

You can’t have two forenoons in the same day. – Russian Proverb

You can’t keep a word of thanks in your pocket. – Russian Proverb

You can’t move faster than your shadow. – Russian Proverb

You can’t sew buttons on your neighbor’s mouth. – Russian Proverb

You can’t throw a handkerchief over somebody’s mouth. – Russian Proverb

You could even hew sticks on head. – Russian Proverb

You do not drink soup with a knife. – Russian Proverb

You do not need a whip to urge on an obedient horse. – Russian Proverb
(A keep worker who is doing his best should be left alone and not urged to work harder)

You do not really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother. – Russian Proverb

You do not swap horses while crossing the ford. – Russian Proverb
(Do not change arrangements while yyou are in the middle of a difficult task or till a crisis is past)

You don’t get a headache from what other people have drunk. – Russian Proverb

You don’t get something for nothing. – Russian Proverb

You don’t learn anything from buying, but you do from selling. – Russian Proverb

You don’t milk a cow with your hands in your pockets. – Russian Proverb

You get to really know your friend when trouble comes. – Russian Proverb

You get used to everything — even hell. – Russian Proverb

You have summer and you have winter — why, then, be in a hurry? – Russian Proverb

You heard the ring, but don’t know where. – Russian Proverb

You know a bird from the way he flies. – Russian Proverb

You look for the horse you ride on. – Russian Proverb

You may call me even a pot, just don’t put me into the oven. – Russian Proverb

You must chop down the tree that gives too much or too little shade. – Russian Proverb

You need a sharp axe for a tough bough. – Russian Proverb
(Serious evils need drastic remedies)

You need sharp axes for knotty trees. – Russian Proverb

You needn’t be afraid of a barking dog, but you should be afraid of a silent dog. – Russian Proverb
(People who often lose their temper and make many loud threats seldom carry them out. Dogs that bark most bite least)

You will reap what you will sow. – Russian Proverb
(You will be rewarded or punished in accordance with what you have done to deserve it)

You would do better to sit on a powder keg than on the knee of a woman. – Russian Proverb

Your body belongs to the Tsar, your soul to God, and your back to the squire. – Russian Proverb

Your dog wishes you a long life. – Russian Proverb

Your elbow is near but you can’t bite it. – Russian Proverb

Your tongue will get you to Kiev. – Russian Proverb

Russian Proverbs and Meaning

  • Алты́нного во́ра ве́шают, а полти́нного че́ствуют.
    • Transliteration: Altynnogo vora veshayut, a poltinnogo chestvuyut.
    • English equivalent: Laws catch flies but let hornets go free.
    • Владимир Иванович Даль; Анатолий Николаевич Филиппов (1 January 2010). 1000 русских пословиц и поговорок. MintRight Inc. p. 107. ISBN 978-5-4250-2657-6.
  • Аппети́т прихо́дит во вре́мя еды́.
    • Transliteration: Appetit prikhodit vo vremya yedy
    • English equivalent: The appetite comes with eating
    • Arany-Makkai (1996). Russian Idioms. Barron’s. p. 3.
  • Арте́льный горшо́к гу́ще кипи́т.
    • Transliteration: Artelnyi gorshok gusche kipit.
    • Translation: Artisanal pots boil (things) more thickly
    • English Equivalent: Many hands make light work.
    • See also: Бери́сь дру́жно, не бу́дет гру́зно.
  • Ахал бы дядя, на себя глядя.
    • Translation: Ahal by dyadya, na sebya glyadya.
    • English Equivalent: The cat shuts its eyes when stealing cream.
    • See also: Чья бы корова мычала, а твоя бы молчала.
  • Ба́ба с во́зу — кобы́ле ле́гче.
    • Transliteration: Baba s vozu — kobyle legche.
    • Translation: It is easier for the mare when a woman is off the cart…
    • Meaning: If you want to sneak away from doing this hard part of the job, go ahead, you will only make it simpler for me. — Also: Good riddance! —
    • Modern mockery: Ба́ба с во́зу — кобы́ла в ку́рсе. (When a woman gets off the cart, the horse will notice.)
  • Ба́бушка (гада́ла, да) на́двое сказа́ла ( — то ли до́ждик, то ли снег, то ли бу́дет, то ли нет).
    • Transliteraion: Babushka (gadala, da) nadvoye skazala ( — to li dozhdik, to li sneg, to li budet, to li net).
    • Translation: Granny (told fortunes and) said two things (— it will either rain or snow; it either will or will not).
    • English equivalent: We’ll see what we’ll see; maybe rain or maybe snow, maybe yes or maybe no.
    • Meaning: The outcome is still unknown (despite all that’s been said.) — Also: You seem uncertain.
    • Compare: Ви́лами на воде́ пи́сано.
  • Беда́ (никогда́) не прихо́дит одна́.
    • Transliteration: Beda (nikogda) ne prikhodit odna.
    • Translation: Trouble never comes alone.
    • English equivalent: Misery loves company.
    • Belentschikow (2009). Russisch-Deutsches Wörterbuch (RDW): O. Harrassowitz Verlag. p. 152. ISBN 3447060859.
  • Без кота́ мыша́м раздо́лье.
    • Transliteration: Bez kota mysham razdol’ye.
    • Translation: Without a cat, mice feel free.
    • English equivalent: When the cat is away, the mice will play.
  • Без труда́ не вы́тащишь и ры́бку из пруда́.
    • Transliteration: Bez truda ne vytaschish y rybku iz pruda.
    • Translation: Without effort, you can’t [even] pull a fish out of the pond.
    • “What you would seem to be, be really.”
    • Benjamin Franklin, Poor Rickard’s Almanack (1744)
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 455. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Armalinskiĭ (1995). Russkie besstyzhie poslovit͡s͡y i pogovorki. M.I.P. Co.. p. 63.
  • Береги́ пла́тье сно́ву, а честь смо́лоду.
    • Transliteration: Beregi plat’ye snovu, a chest’ smolodu.
    • Translation: Take care of clothes from new, take care of [your] honor from when [you are] young.
    • English equivalent: Those who would be young when they are old must be old when they are young.
    • Мокиенко, Сидоренко (2005). Школьный словарь крылатых выражений Пушкина. Нева. p. 30. ISBN 5765445403.
  • Бережёного Бог бережёт.
    • Transliteration: Berezhonogo bog berezhot.
    • Translation: God keeps those safe who keep themselves safe.
    • Closest English equivalent: God helps those who help themselves. Pray to God but keep the powder dry.
    • Modern mockery: Бережёного Бог бережёт, а небережёного конвой стережёт. (God watches over those who are careful, and the jail wardens watch over those who were not.)
    • Meaning: Blessings/luck come most to those who do not recklessly rely on them, but work for them.
    • Visson (1991). From Russian into English: an introduction to simultaneous interpretation. Ardis. p. 151. ISBN 0875010954.
  • Бери́сь дру́жно, не бу́дет гру́зно.
    • Transliteration: Beris’ druzhno, ne budet gruzno.
    • Translation: [If all of us] take hold of [it] together, it won’t feel heavy.
    • English equivalent: Many hands make light work
    • See also: Арте́льный горшо́к гу́ще кипи́т.
      • Note: Mertvago translates this as “Good will and welcome are the best cheer,” but the literal definition is closer to the original translation.
    • Margulis, Kholodnaya (2000). Russian-English dictionary of proverbs and sayings. McFarland. p. 22. ISBN 0786407034.
  • Бли́зок локото́к, да не уку́сишь.
    • Transliteration: Blizok lokotok, da ne ukusish.
    • Translation: [Your] elbow is close, yet [you] can’t bite it.
    • Meaning: It’s harder than it looks.
    • Nezhat, Nezhat, Nezhat (2008). Nezhat’s Operative Gynecologic Laparoscopy and Hysteroscopy. Cambridge University Press. p. 2. ISBN 0521862493.
  • Бог дал, Бог и взял.
    • Transliteration: Bog dal, bog i vzyal.
    • Translation: God gave, God took back.
    • English equivalent: The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away.
    • Margulis, Kholodnaya (2000). Russian-English dictionary of proverbs and sayings. McFarland. p. 24. ISBN 0786407034.
  • Бог тро́ицу лю́бит.
    • Transliteration: Bog troitsu lyubit.
    • Translation: God likes trinity.
    • English equivalent: All good comes in threes.
    • Margulis, Kholodnaya (2000). Russian-English dictionary of proverbs and sayings. McFarland. p. 24. ISBN 0786407034.
  • Лучше пройти мимо опасности, чем быть всегда в страхе.
    • Transliteration: Bodlivoy korove bog rog ne dayot.
    • English equivalent: Tomorrow comes never.
    • “Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise.”
    • Margaret Atwood, Cat’s Eye (1988)
    • Alexander Margulis; Asya Kholodnaya (1 February 2000). Russian-English Dictionary of Proverbs and Sayings. McFarland. p. 276. ISBN 978-0-7864-3748-1.
  • Болту́н — нахо́дка для шпио́на.
    • Transliteration: Boltun — nakhodka dlya shpiona.
    • Translation: A chatterbox is a treasure for a spy.
    • English equivalent: Loose lips sink ships.
  • Большо́му кораблю́ — большо́е пла́вание.
    • Transliteration: Bol’shomu korablyu — bol’shoye plavaniye.
    • Translation: For a big ship, a big voyage.
    • Modern mockery: Большо́му кораблю́ — больша́я торпе́да. (For a big ship, a big torpedo)
    • Meaning: Remarkable people make a big impact in the world.
  • Бу́дет и на на́шей у́лице пра́здник.
    • Transliteration: Budet i na nashey ulitse prazdnik.
    • Translation: There’ll be a holiday in our street too.
    • Meaning: One day we will get lucky too.
  • Бума́га всё сте́рпит.
    • Transliteration: Bumaga vsyo sterpit.
    • Translation: Paper will endure anything.
    • Alt: Бумага без души – что угодно пиши.
    • Translation: Paper has no soul – you can put anything on it.”
    • English equivalent: Paper is forbearing.
    • Latin version: Epistula non erubescit – A letter doesn’t blush (Cicero)
    • Contrast: Что напи́сано перо́м — не вы́рубить топоро́м.
    • Раков, Юрий (1999). Сокровища античной и библейской мудрости: происхождение афоризмов и образных выражений. ОЛМА-Пресс. p. 30. ISBN 5765403697.
  • Была́ не была́.
    • Transliteration: Byla ne byla.
    • Translation: There was — there wasn’t.
    • Meaning: Whatever the consequences can be — I’ll try it!
    • Compare: И́ли грудь в креста́х, и́ли голова́ в куста́х.; Дву́м смертя́м не быва́ть, одно́й не минова́ть.
  • Вали́ на се́рого, се́рый всё свезёт.
    • Transliteration: Vali na serogo, seryy vsyo svezyot.
    • Translation: Blame it on the Grey (folk name of wolf), it’ll bear anything.
  • Вашими бы устами да мед пить.
    • Transliteration: “Vashymi by ustami da myod pit’.”
    • Translation: With your mouth it would be good to drink mead (sweet alcoholic beverage made out of fermented honey).
    • Meaning: It would be good if everything would turn out as you say (said in response to favorable predictions, assumptions, comforting words, etc.); may your words come true.
    • English equivalent: From your mouth to God’s ears.
  • В гостя́х хорошо́, а до́ма лу́чше.
    • Transliteration: V gostyakh khorosho, a doma luchshe.
    • Translation: Visiting is good, but home is better.
    • English equivalent: East or West – home is best.
  • В дождь избы́ не кро́ют, а в вёдро и сама́ не ка́плет.
    • Translitration: V dozhd’ izby ne kroyut, a v vyodro i sama ne kaplet
    • Translation: When it’s raining one won’t [fix the] roof [of] the cottage, and when it’s clear and sunny the roof isn’t leaking.
    • Meaning: Lazy people always find excuses to delay their job.
  • В до́ме пове́шенного не говоря́т о верёвке.
    • Transliteration: V dome poveshennovo ne govoryat o veryovke.
    • English equivalent: In the house of the hanged man, [they] mention not the rope.
    • Михайлович, Мокиенко Валерий (2010). Большой словарь русских пословиц. ОЛМА Медиа Групп. p. 291. ISBN 978-5-373-03250-6.
  • Век живи́ — век учи́сь.
    • Transliteration: Vek zhivi — vek uchis’.
    • Translation: Live for a century — learn for a century.
    • English equivalent: We are to learn as long as we live.
    • Virtus sui gloria.
      Think that day lost whose (low) descending sun
      Views from thy hand no noble action done.”
    • Jacob Bobart, in David Krieg’s Album in British Museum (December 8, 1697); see also Staniford, Art of Reading, 3d Ed, p. 27. [1803].
  • Вели́к те́лом, да мал де́лом.
    • Transliteration: Velik telom, da mal delom
    • Translation: Big in body, but small in deeds.
  • Видна́ пти́ца по полёту.
    • Transliteration: Vidna ptitsa po polyotu.
    • Translation: The bird is known by its flight.
    • English equivalent: A tree is known by its fruit.
    • Meaning: You can judge someone based on his surroundings. For instance, a person living in a messy house is messy.
    • Modern mockery: Видна́ пти́ца по помёту. (The bird is known by its droppings.)
  • Ви́дит о́ко, да зуб неймёт.
    • Transliteration: Vidit oko, da zub neymyot.
    • Translation: The eye can see it, but the tooth can’t bite it.
    • English equivalent: One’s reach exceeds one’s grasp.
  • Вино́ вину́ твори́т.
    • Transliteration: Vino vinu tvorit.
    • Translation: Wine causes guilt.
  • В нога́х правды не́т.
    • Transliteration: V nogakh pravdy net.
    • Translation: There is no truth in feet.
    • Meaning: Take a seat, please.
  • Во́лка но́ги ко́рмят.
    • Transliteration: Volka nogi kormyat.
    • Translation: Wolf feeds on his feet.
    • Meaning: A hard time of scarce resources.
  • Волк в ове́чьей шку́ре.
    • Transliteration: Volk v ovech’yey shkurye.
    • Translation: Wolf in sheep’s pelt.
    • English equivalent: Wolf in sheep’s clothing.
    • Meaning: “An innocent demeanor may hide much guilt.”
    • Compare: В ти́хом о́муте че́рти во́дятся.
  • Волко́в боя́ться — в лес не ходи́ть.
    • Transliteration: Volkov boyat’sa — v les ne khodit.
    • Literally: To fear the wolves — not to go into the woods.
    • Translation: [Just] because one fears wolves, is one not to go into the woods?
    • Translation note: Although the original proverb has the structure of a declarative sentence it is commonly understood and used in context as a rhetorical question.
    • Meaning: “Fear is no excuse from [possibly risky but] necessary undertakings.”
    • English equivalent: (You need to) face your fears.
  • Во́рон во́рону глаз не вы́клюет.
    • Transliteration: Voron voronu glaz ne vyklyuyet.
    • Translation: The raven won’t peck out the eye of [another] raven.
    • English equivalent: Hawks will not pick out hawk’s eyes.
    • Compare: Рука́ ру́ку мо́ет.
  • Вот где соба́ка зары́та.
    • Transliteration: Vot gde sobaka zaryta
    • Translation: That’s where the dog is buried
    • English equivalent: That’s where the shoe pinches; That’s the crux (the rub).
    • See also: Вот в чём загво́здка.
  • Вре́мя — лу́чший до́ктор
    • Transliteration: Vremya — luchshiy doktor.
    • Translation: Time [makes the] best healer.
    • English equivalent: Time heals all wounds.
    • Modern mockery: Время — лучший доктор, но ужасный косметолог. (Time is the best healer, but a terrible cosmetologist.)
  • В семье́ не без уро́да.
    • Transliteration: V sem’ye ne bez uroda.
    • Translation: No family has no ugly member.
    • English equivalent: There is a black sheep in every flock.
  • Всё хорошо́, что хорошо́ конча́ется.
    • Transliteration: Vsyo khorosho, chto khorosho konchayetsa.
    • Translation: All is well that ends well.
    • English equivalent: All’s well that ends well.
  • Всяк кули́к своё боло́то хва́лит.
    • Transliteration: Vsyak kulik svoyo boloto khvalit.
    • Translation: Every sandpiper praises his own swamp.
    • Meaning: Everyone praises their own work (or possession), no matter how inferior it is.
    • English equivalent: Every cook praises his own broth.
  • Вся́кому о́вощу своё вре́мя.
    • Transliteration: Vsyakomu ovoshchu svoyo vremya.
    • Translation: Every vegetable has its time.
    • English equivalent: Everything is good in its season.
    • “Plans are insulted destinies. I don’t have plans, I only have goals.”
    • Ash Chandler, Freudian SlipMumbai Mirror Buzz, April (2006).
    • Compare: Пе́рвый блин (всегда́) ко́мом.
  • Всяк сверчо́к знай свой шесто́к.
    • Transliteration: Vsyak sverchok znai svoy shestok.
    • Translation: Every cricket must know its hearth
    • English equivalent: A blind man should not judge of colours.
    • “An uneducated man cannot judge of the attainments of the learned.”
    • M. W. Carr (1868). A Collection of Telugu Proverbs translated, illustrated and explained; together with some Sanscrit Proverbs printed in the Devanâgarî and Telugu Characters: By M. W. Carr. A Supplement to the Collection of Telugu Proverbs: containing additional Proverbs, an Index verborum, and an index to the European Proverbs quoted in illustration. Christian Knowledge Society’s Press. p. 141.
  • В тесноте́, да не в оби́де.
    • Transliteration: V tesnote da ne v obide.
    • Translation: In a crush, yet without resentment.
    • Meaning: Though the place is crowded, nobody will mind if you join as well. — Also: Come on in!
    • Compare: Вме́сте те́сно, а врозь ску́чно.
  • В Ту́лу со свои́м самова́ром (не е́здят)
    • Transliteration: V Tulu so svoim samovarom (ne yezdyat).
    • Translation: (Do not come) to Tula with your own samovar.
    • English equivalent: Carry coals to Newcastle.
    • Swedish equivalent: Do not cross the brook for water.
    • Modern mockery: В Тулу со своим пулемётом (To Tula with your own machine gun; Tula is center of firearms design and production).
    • Meaning: Don’t do things in a needlessly laborious way.
    • 實用漢俄分類詞典. 中央圖書. 1996. p. 541.
  • В чужо́й монасты́рь со свои́м уста́вом не хо́дят.
    • Transliteration: V chuzhoy monastyr’ so svoim ustavom ne khodyat.
    • Translation: No-one goes to another monastery with their own charter.
    • English equivalent: When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
    • Compare: В Ту́лу со свои́м самова́ром (не е́здят).
  • В чужо́м глазу́ сори́нку заме́тно, а в своём — бревна́ не вида́ть.
    • Transliteration: V chuzhom glazu sorinku zametno, a v svoyom — brevna ne vidat.
    • Translation: In another person’s eye one can notice [even] a mote, but in one’s own, cannot see [even] a log.
    • English equivalent: Luke 6:41: And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but perceivest not the beam that is in thine own eye?
    • See also: Чья́ бы коро́ва мыча́ла, а твоя́ бы молча́ла; На зе́ркало не́ча пеня́ть, ко́ли ро́жа крива́.
  • Где то́нко — там и рвётся.
    • Transliteration: Gde tonko — tam i rvyotsya.
    • Translation: It will snap where it is thinnest.
    • English equivalent: The chain is no stronger than its weakest link.
    • Meaning: “A weak part or member will affect the success or effectiveness of the whole.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 31 July 2013.
  • Гла́дко бы́ло на бума́ге, да забы́ли про овра́ги (, а по ним шага́ть).
    • Transliteration: Gladko bylo na bumage, da zabyli pro ovragi (, a po nim shagat’).
    • Translation: It worked on paper, but [we’ve] forgotten about ravines (and we’ll have to march [them]).
    • Meaning: Obstacles that were overlooked/ignored during planning, turned out to be a major showstopper when executing the plan.
  • Глаза́ боя́тся, а ру́ки де́лают.
    • Transliteration: Glaza boyatsya, a ruki delayut.
    • Translation: The eyes are (might be) afraid, but the hands are doing [the job]].
    • English equivalent: The dog gnaws the bone because he cannot swallow it; You never know what you can do till you try
    • Meaning: If you’re afraid of doing something, relax and and let your reflexes do the job; — Also: Don’t be afraid if the amount of work seems large; it can be handled step-by-step.
    • Compare: Я́годка по я́годке – бу́дет кузово́к; У стра́ха глаза́ велики́.
    • Мокиенко Валерий Михайлович (2010). Большой словарь русских пословиц. ОЛМА Медиа Групп. p. 174. ISBN 978-5-373-03250-6. Retrieved on 7 June 2013.
  • Говоря́т, что кур доя́т.
    • Transliteration: Govoryat, shto kur doyat.
    • Translation: They say they milk chickens.
    • Meaning: Don’t believe all the rumors.
  • Го́лод не тётка (, пирожка́ не поднесёт).
    • Transliteration: Golod ne tyotka (, pirozhka nye podnesyot).
    • Translation: Hunger is not [your] aunt (, [it] will not bring you a pie).
    • Meaning: If you are in need, help yourself and don’t count on the situation improving by itself. — Also: If you’re in need, take what they give you, it’s not time to decline offers.
    • English equivalent: Birds fly not into our mouth ready roasted; God helps those who help themselves; No pain, no gain
    • Meaning: One cannot (or should not) expect to benefit without making some effort.
    • Compare: Дарёному коню́ в зу́бы не смотря́т; На безры́бье и рак — ры́ба.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 455. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Иванович Даль, Владимир (2002). Толковый словарь живого великорусского языка. В 2 тт. Т. 1: А—О. ОЛМА Медиа Групп. p. 345. ISBN 5224035848.
  • Го́лой овцы́ не стригу́т.
    • Transliteration: Goloy ovtsy ne strigut.
    • Translation: One doesn’t shear naked sheep.
    • English equivalent: A beggar can never be bankrupt.
  • Голь на вы́думку хитра́.
    • Transliteration: Gol’ na vydumku khitra.
    • Translation: Poor people are crafty.
    • English equivalent: Necessity is the mother of invention.
  • Горба́того моги́ла испра́вит.
    • Transliteration: Gorbatovo mogila ispravit.
    • Translation: [Only] grave will cure the hunchback.
    • English equivalent: The leopard cannot change his spots.
    • Meaning: A person can never change his character.
    • Compare: Зарека́лася лиса́ кур не ворова́ть.
  • Гром не гря́нет, мужи́к не перекре́стится.
    • Transliteration: Grom ne gryanet, muzhik ne perekrestitsya.
    • Translation: Unless thunder strikes, a man won’t cross himself.
    • Cultural background: Since lightning strikes were considered acts of punishment by God, it was believed that crossing oneself would prevent one from being hit by a lightning.
    • Swedish equivalent: You don’t miss the cow until the barn is empty.
    • Meaning: People tend to not take precautionary measures until trouble actually happens.
  • Гусь свинье́ не това́рищ.
    • Transliteration: Gus’ svin’ye ne tovarisch.
    • Translation: A goose is not a pig’s friend.
    • Meaning: Opposite of Birds of a feather flock together; — Also: I despise you.
    • Answer: Ну, тогда я полетел.(Well, I’m flying away.)
    • Compare: Тамбо́вский волк тебе́ това́рищ.
  • Дай с ногото́к – попро́сит с локото́к.
    • Transliteration: Day s nogotok – poprosit s lokotok.
    • Translation: Give [him] a fingernail, [he] will ask for the forearm.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch and he’ll take a yard/mile.
  • Дарёному коню́ в зу́бы не смо́трят.
    • Transliteration: Daryonomu konyu v zuby ne smotryat.
    • Translation: Don’t look at the teeth of a horse you’ve been given.
    • Note: Looking at a horse’s teeth is a way to determine its age, and thus its value (a practice that also gives us the English expression “long in the tooth,” meaning old.)
    • English equivalent: Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth.
    • Meaning: Don’t question a gift’s value; be thankful, rather than judging something you received as a gift.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 54. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Compare: Го́лод не тётка(, пирожка́ не поднесёт).
    • Modern mockery: Дарёному коню́ под хвост не смо́трят. (Don’t check a gift horse under the tail)
  • Даю́т – бери́, а бьют – беги́.
    • Transliteration: Dayut – beri, a b’yut – begi
    • Translation: If given – take it; if beaten – run away.
  • Дву́м смертя́м не быва́ть, одно́й не минова́ть.
    • Transliteration: Dvum smertyam ne byvat, odnoy ne minovat’
    • Translation: Two deaths will not happen, [but] one is inevitable.
    • Meaning: It’s worthwhile to take a risk.
    • Compare: И́ли грудь в креста́х, и́ли голова́ в куста́х.; Была́ не была́.
  • Дели́ть шку́ру неуби́того медве́дя.
    • Transliteration: Delit’ shkuru neubitovo medvedya.
    • Translation: To divide the pelt of a bear not yet killed.
    • English equivalent: To cook a hare before catching him; Don’t count your chickens before they hatch; Don’t run before your horse to market; Don’t put the cart before the horse.
    • Compare: Не говори́ гоп, пока́ не переско́чишь (перепры́гнешь).
  • Де́ло ма́стера бои́тся.
    • Transliteration: Delo mastera boitsya.
    • Translation: Work is afraid of a skilled worker.
    • Meaning: Work goes well when you know what you are doing.
  • До́брое бра́тство — лу́чшее бога́тство.
    • Transliteration: Dobroye bratstvo — luchsheye bogatstvo.
    • Translation: Good brotherhood is the best wealth.
    • Compare: Не име́й сто рубле́й, а име́й сто друзе́й.
  • До́брое сло́во и ко́шке прия́тно.
    • Transliteration: Dobroye slovo i koshke priyatno.
    • Translation: Even a cat appreciates kind word[s].
  • Долг платежо́м кра́сен.
    • Transliteration: Dolg platezhom krasen.
    • Translation: Debt is beautiful [only] after [it is] repaid.
    • Meaning: Debt is a shame until it is repaid; – Also used as a hint: It’s time for you to pay me back.
    • English equivalent: One good turn deserves another.
  • До́ма и сте́ны помога́ют.
    • Transliteration: Doma i steny pomogayut.
    • Translation: [When you are] at home, even the walls help [you].
  • Дорога́ ло́жка к обе́ду.
    • Transliteration: Doroga lozhka k obyedu.
    • Transalation: A spoon is valuable at dinner.
    • Meaning: Things are best in their respective time.; Proper timing is everything. — Also: Things are most expensive when in high demand.
    • Compare: До́рого яи́чко ко Христо́ву дню.
    • See also: Вся́кому о́вощу своё вре́мя.
    • English equivalent: A stitch in time saves nine.
  • До́рого яи́чко ко Христо́ву дню.
    • Transliteration: Dorogo yaichko k Khristovu dnyu.
    • Translation: A spring egg is dear at the Easter day.
    • Meaning: Things are best in their respective time.; Proper timing is everything. — Also: Things are most expensive when in high demand.
    • Compare: Дорога́ ло́жка к обе́ду.
  • Дру́жба дру́жбой, а слу́жба слу́жбой.
    • Transliteration: Druzhba druzhboy, a sluzhba sluzhboy.
    • Translation: Friendship is friendship but service is service.
    • Meaning: Friendship is one thing, business another; Nothing personal; just business.
    • Compare: Дру́жба дру́жбой, а табачо́к (де́нежки) – врозь.
  • Дру́жба дру́жбой, а табачо́к (де́нежки) – врозь.
    • Transliteration: Druzhba druzhboy, a tabachok (denezhki) — vroz’.
    • Translation: Friendship is friendship, but [keep our] tobacco (money) apart.
    • Meaning: You might be my friend, but it doesn’t entitle you to using my assets (or not repaying my debts).
    • Compare: Дру́жба дру́жбой, а слу́жба слу́жбой.
  • Друг познаётся в беде́.
    • Transliteration: Drug poznayotsa v bede.
    • Translation: [You get to really] know [your] friend when trouble [comes].
    • English equivalent: A friend in need’s a friend indeed.
  • Дурака́м зако́н не пи́сан (, е́сли пи́сан, то не чи́тан, е́сли чи́тан, то не по́нят, е́сли по́нят, то не так).
    • Transliteration: Durakam zakon ne pisan (, yesli pisan, to ne chitan, yesli chitan, to ne ponyat, yesly ponyat, to ne tak).
    • Translation: There is no law written for fools ( if it is written it’s not read, if it is read it’s not understood, if it is understood, in the wrong way).
    • English equivalent: There is no law for fools.
  • Дура́к завя́жет — и у́мный не развя́жет.
    • Transliteration: Durak zavyazhet — u umnyy ne razvyazhet.
    • Translation: [If] the fool ties [a knot], even a clever person can’t untie it.
    • English equivalent: A fool may throw a stone into a well which a hundred wise men cannot pull out.
  • Дурако́в не се́ют, не жнут, са́ми родя́тся.
    • Transliteration: Durakov ne seyut, ne zhnut, sami rodyatsya.
    • Translation: Fools are not sown or reaped, they appear by themselves.
    • English equivalent: There’s a sucker born every minute.
  • Е́дешь на́ день, хле́ба бери́ на неде́лю.
    • Transliteration: Yedesh na den’, khleba beri na nedelyu.
    • Translation: If you take a day trip, take a week’s supply of bread.
    • English equivalent: Always be prepared (or “always bring more than you need”); Better to have and not need than to need and not have.
    • Compare: Запа́с карма́н не тя́нет
  • Ели—пили, веселились. Подсчитали — прослезились
    • Transliteration: Yeley-peeley, veselealeas’. Podschitalee — proslezealees’
    • Translation: [Theу/we] Ate and drank and make merry. Then [they/we] counted and shed tears.
    • Meaning: For all you have to pay, sooner or later.
  • Е́сли бы да кабы́ да во рту росли́ грибы́ (бобы́)(, это был бы не рот, а огоро́д).
    • Transliteration: Yesli by da kaby da vo rtu rosli griby (boby) (, eto byl by nye rot a ogorod)
    • Translation: If and when mushrooms (beans) grew in the mouth(, that would have been not mouth but kitchen garden).
    • English equivalent: If ifs and buts were candy and nuts; If wishes were horses, beggars might ride.; If ifs and ands were pots and pans, then we would need no tinkers.; If wishes were fishes, there’d be no room in the river for water.; If wishes were horses, we’d all be eating steak.
    • Modern mockery: Если бы у бабушки были яйца, то она была бы дедушкой (If only Grandma had balls, she would have been Grandpa)
  • Если бы молодость знала, если бы старость могла.
    • Transliteration: Yesli by molodost’ znala, yesli by starost’ mogla.
    • Translation: If only youth would know, if only old age were able.
    • Meaning: If only youth had the wisdom, and old age had the strength everything would have been much better.
    • English equivalent: Youth is wasted on the young
  • Если бы не закон, не было бы и преступника.
    • English equivalent: The more laws, the more offenders.
  • Жизнь прожи́ть — не по́ле перейти́.
    • Transliteration: Zhizn’ prozhit’ — ne pole pereyti.
    • Translation: Living [your] life is not like crossing a meadow.
    • English equivalent: Life was never meant to be easy; life’s no walk in the park.
    • Source note: this proverb originated as a line in Boris Pasternak’s poem “Hamlet.”
  • Запретный плод сладок
    • Translation: Forbidden fruit is sweet.
    • English equivalent: Forbidden fruit is sweetest.
    • Meaning: “Things that you must not have or do are always the most desirable.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 93. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • János Erdélyi (1851). Magyar közmondások könlyve. Nyomatott Kozma Vazulnál. p. 169.
    • Школьный словарь живых русских пословиц. ОЛМА Медиа Групп. p. 320. ISBN 978-5-7654-1546-7. Retrieved on 7 June 2013.
  • Зако́н что ды́шло, куда́ повернёшь – туда́ и вы́шло.
    • Transliteration: Zakon chto dyshlo, kuda povernyosh – tuda i vyshlo.
    • Translation: Law is like the shaft of a cart, it points wherever you turn it.
    • Alt. Translation: The law is like a shaft, no matter the way you turn it, you’re shafted.
    • Meaning: Powerful, rich or smart people can make the law work for them.
  • Заста́вь дурака́ Бо́гу моли́ться – он (себе́) лоб расшибёт (и други́м но́ги поотшиба́ет).
    • Transliteration: Zastav’ duraka Bogu molitsya – on (sebe) lob rasshibyot (i drugim nogi pootshibayet).
    • Translation: [If you] make a fool pray to God, he will hurt (both his) forehead (and other people’s toes).
    • Meaning: When eagerness is coupled with lack of understanding of the task, one’s efforts will be more of a hindrance than a help; Better not to follow instructions literally but understand their purpose.
    • English equivalent: Zeal without knowledge is a runaway horse.
    • “Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it conscientiously.”
    • Variant: “Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction” (trans. W.F. Trotter)
    • Blaise Pascal, Pensées (1669) (# 894 or 895, depending on differing editions).
    • Compare: Что ни сде́лает дура́к — все он сде́лает не так; Медве́жья услу́га.
  • За чем пойдёшь, то и найдёшь.
    • Transliteration: Za chem poydyosh, to i naydyosh.
    • Translation: What [you] go looking for, [you] will find.
    • Compare: Пошёл за ше́рстью, а верну́лся стри́женым; Не рой друго́му я́му, сам в неё попадёшь.
  • За что боро́лись, на то и напоро́лись.
    • Transliteration: Za chto borolis’, na to i naporolis’.
    • Translation: Whatever [we, they] fought for is what [we, they] impaled [ourselves, themselves] upon.
    • English equivalents: To be hoisted by one’s own petard; to shoot oneself in the foot; to slit one’s own throat.
    • Meaning: One can suffer for his/her activity or initiative; result is sometimes an oposite of expected.
  • За что купи́л, за то и продаю́ (, не лю́бо – не слу́шай, а врать не меша́й).
    • Transliteration: Za chto kupil, za to i prodayu (, ne lyubo – ne slushay, a vrat’ ne meshay).
    • Translation: I sell it for what I bought it (, if you don’t like it, don’t listen, but don’t hamper [my] lying/telling).
    • Meaning: I don’t endorse this message, I’m just telling you what I was told.
    • English equivalent: Don’t shoot the messenger.
  • Зна́ет ко́шка, чьё мя́со съе́ла.
    • Compare: На во́ре и ша́пка гори́т.
    • Transliteration: Znayet koshka, ch’yo myaso s’yela.
    • Translation: The cat knows whose meat it has eaten.
    • English equivalent: A guilty conscience needs no accuser.
    • Meaning: “People who know they have done wrong reveal their guilt by the things they say or the way they interpret what other people say.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 112. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
  • И волки сыты, и овцы целы.
    • Transliteration: I volki syty, i ovtsy tsely.
    • Translation: The wolves are sated, and the sheep are intact.
    • Meaning: Sometimes it is impossible to get two desired things at the same time.
    • English equivalent: You can’t have your cake and eat it too.
    • Compare: За двумя зайцами погонишься (, ни одного не поймаешь). Двух зайцев одной пулей.
    • Belentschikow (2009). Russisch-Deutsches Wörterbuch (RDW): O. Harrassowitz Verlag. p. 136. ISBN 3447060859.
  • Из двух зол выбира́ют ме́ньшее.
    • Transliteration: Iz dvukh zol vybirayut men’sheye.
    • Translation: [They] choose lesser of two evils.
    • Meaning: If all the options are bad, choose the one that hurts the least.
    • English equivalent: Lesser of two evils
  • Из огня́ да в полымя́.
    • Transliteration: Iz ognya da v polymya.
    • Translation: From fire to flame.
    • English equivalent: Out of the frying pan and into the fire.
    • Compare: Ме́жду мо́лотом и накова́льней.
    • “Who are a little wise the best fools be.”
    • John Donne, The Triple Fool (~1600)
    • Offord (1996). Using Russian: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 151. ISBN 0521457602.
  • Из пе́сни сло́ва не вы́кинешь.
    • Transliteration: Iz pesni slova ne vykinesh.
    • Translation: [You] cannot throw a word out of a song.
    • Meaning: You cannot alter the information that many people know by heart. — Also: The following may contain obscene, rude or otherwise questionable content, yet it content cannot be omitted as it’s an integral part of the story.
    • Compare: Сло́во – не воробе́й: вы́летит – не пойма́ешь.; Что напи́сано перо́м – не вы́рубить топоро́м.
    • English equivalent: A word dropped from a song makes it all wrong.
  • Искру́ туши́ до пожа́ра, беду́ отводи́ до уда́ра.
    • Transliteration: Iskru tushi do pozhara, bedu otvodi do udara.
    • Translation: Extinguish the spark before the [the house is on] fire, deflect the trouble before [its] strike.
    • English equivalent: Prevention is better than cure.; An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
  • Исподво́ль и ольху́ согнёшь.
    • Transliteration: Ispodvol’ i ol’khu sognyosh.
    • Translation: You can bend an alder-tree, if you do it gradually.
    • English equivalent: Little strokes fell great oaks.; Time conquers all.
  • Ищи́ ве́тра в по́ле.
    • Transliteration: Ishchi vetra v pole.
    • Translation: Look for wind in a field.
    • Meaning: What’s lost cannot be found.
    • English equivalent: You can’t catch the wind in a net.
  • И один в поле воин.
    • Translation: Even one matters in the battlefield.
    • Mertvago, Peter (March 25, 1998). Dictionary of 1000 Russian proverbs: with English equivalents. Hippocrene Books. p. 104. ISBN 978-0-7818-0564-3. Retrieved on July 18, 2013.
  • Как ау́кнется — так и откли́кнется.
    • Transliteration: Kak auknetsya — tak i otkliknetsya.
    • Translation: How [echo] is prompted, it will bounce back.
    • Meaning: Others will treat you the way you treat them.
    • English equivalent: What goes around, comes around.
    • Compare: Что посе́ешь, то пожнёшь.
  • Ка́шу ма́слом не испо́ртишь.
    • Transliteration: Kashu maslom ne isportish.
    • Translation: One can’t spoil porridge with butter.
    • Meaning: You can’t spoil a good thing with another good thing.
    • English equivalent: Plenty is no plague.
    • Compare: Мно́го — не ма́ло.
  • Клин кли́ном вышиба́ют.
    • Transliteration: Klin klinom vyshibayut.
    • Translation: They use a wedge to knock out a wedge.
    • Meaning: Pay back with the same medicine.
    • English equivalents: Fight fire with fire; Like cures like; One nail drives out another.
  • Когото́к увя́з – всей пти́чке пропа́сть.
    • Transliteration: Kogotok uvyaz — vsey ptichke propast.
    • Translation: If the claw is stuck, the whole bird is lost.
    • Meaning: Trouble begins with small mistakes.
    • Compare: Пришла́ беда́ – отворя́й ворота́, Лиха́ беда́ нача́ло.
  • Козла́ бо́йся спе́реди, коня́ — сза́ди, а лихо́го челове́ка — со всех сторо́н.
    • Transliteration: Kozla boysya speredi, konya — szadi, a likhogo cheloveka — so vsekh storon.
    • Translation: Beware of the goat from its front side, of the horse – from its back side, and the evil man – from any side.
    • Closest English equivalent: He who sups with the devil must use a long spoon.
  • Конь о четырёх нога́х, да и тот спотыка́ется.
    • Transliteration: Kon’ o chetyryokh nogakh, da i tot spotykaetsya.
    • Translation: A horse has four legs, but still stumbles.
    • English equivalent: It is a good horse that never stumbles.
    • Meaning: Even most experienced (or most capable) people make mistakes sometimes.
    • Compare: Не ошиба́ется тот, кто ничего́ не де́лает.
  • Коней на переправе не меняют
    • Translation: Don’t swap horses when crossing the stream.
    • Note: When in water it is arduous to mount and dismount.
    • English equivalent: Don’t change horses in the midstream.
    • “There is only one good. And that is to act according to the dictates of one’s conscience.”
    • Simone de Beauvoir, All Men are Mortal (1946)
    • Мокиенко Валерий Михайлович (2010). Большой словарь русских пословиц. ОЛМА Медиа Групп. p. 26. ISBN 978-5-373-03250-6. Retrieved on 7 June 2013.
  • Копе́йка рубль бережёт (, а рубль го́лову стережёт).
    • Transliteration: Kopeyka rubl’ berezhot (, a rubl’ golovu sterezhot).
    • Translation: A kopeck saves the rouble (, and the rouble guards your head).
    • English equivalent: Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves.
  • Куда́ конь с копы́том, туда и рак с клешнёй.
    • Transliteration: Kuda kon’ s kopytom, tuda i rak c kleshnyoy.
    • Translation: Where [goes] a horse with [its] hoof, there [goes] a crayfish with [its] pincer.
  • Куда́ ни кинь, везде́ (всё, всю́ду) клин.
    • Transliteration: Kuda ni kin’, vezde (vsyo,vsyudu) klin.
    • English equivalent: Damned if you do, damned if you don’t
    • Compare: Что в лоб, что по́ лбу; Что пнём об сову, что сово́й об пень.
  • Куй желе́зо, пока горячо́.
    • Transliteration: Kuy zhelezo, poka goryacho.
    • Translation: Strike while the iron is hot.
    • Meaning: Do things while it’s the best time to to them.
    • English equivalent: Strike while the iron is hot; Make hay while the sun shines.
    • Modern mockery: Куй желе́зо, пока Горбачёв (Strike iron while Gorbachyov [is at power] — encouraging people to use the opportunities opened by

Smeshnoi ruski eto krytoi ruski Translation: A funny russian is a cool russian Perestroika, as it wasn’t believed at the time that they will last)

  • Ла́сковый телёнок двух ма́ток сосёт.
    • Transliteration: Laskovyy telyonok dvukh matok sosyot.
    • Translation: The affectionate calf sucks [udders of] two cows.
    • Meaning: One can take advantage of both sides (in a dispute). Such behavior is often seen with disapproval.
  • Лбом сте́нку не расшибёшь.
    • Transliteration: Lbom stenku ne rasshibyosh.
    • Translation: You cannot break a wall with your forehead.
    • Meaning: Use the correct tool for the job. – Also: Don’t deal with stubborn people.
    • English equivalent: Don’t kick against the pricks, meaning don’t try to remove a thorn by pushing it in deeper — don’t injure yourself in an attempt to use brute force to go through/past an obstacle which requires finesse in order to pass.
  • Лежа́чего не бьют.
    • Transliteration: Lezhachevo ne b’yut.
    • Translation: One shouldn’t beat the one who fell.
    • English equivalent: Don’t kick a man when he’s down.
  • Лес ру́бят — ще́пки летя́т.
    • Transliteration: Les rubyat — schepki letyat.
    • Translation: When wood is chopped, woodchips will fly.
    • English equivalent: You can’t make an omelette without breaking an egg.
  • Лиха́ беда́ нача́ло.
    • Transliteration: Likha beda nachalo.
    • Translation: Beginning is the big trouble.
    • Meaning: Starting something is the hardest part of business.
    • English equivalent: A good beginning makes a good ending.
    • Compare: Глаза́ боя́тся, а ру́ки де́лают.
  • Ло́жка дегтю по́ртит бо́чку мёда.
    • Transliteration: Lozhka dyogtya portit bochku myoda.
    • Translation: A spoonful of tar spoils a barrel of honey.
    • English equivalent: A fly in the ointment; The rotten apple spoils the barrel.
  • Лу́чшее — враг хоро́шего.
    • Transliteration: Luchsheye — vrag khoroshego.
    • English equivalent: Best is the enemy of good.
  • Лу́чше оди́н раз уви́деть, чем сто раз услы́шать.
    • Transliteration: Luchshe odin raz uvidet’, chem sto raz uslyshat’
    • Translation: It’s better to see once than hear a hundred times.
    • English equivalent: Seeing is believing; One look is worth a thousand words.
  • Лу́чше по́здно, чем никогда́.
    • Transliteration: Luchshe pozdno, chem nikogda.
    • Translation: Better late than never.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
  • Любо́вь зла́, полю́бишь и козла́.
    • Transliteration: Lyubov’ zla, polyubish i kozla.
    • Translation: love’s evil, you’ll love even a goat.
    • English equivalent: Love is blind.
  • Муж в Тверь – жена в дверь
    • Transliteration: Muzh v Tver – zhena v dver.
    • Translation: Husband [travels to the city of] Tver – wife goes out the door
  • Молоде́ц про́тив ове́ц, а про́тив молодца́ — и сам овца́.
    • Transliteration: Molodets protiv ovets, a protiv moldtsa — i sam ovtsa.
    • Translation: [He is] brave [when fighting] against sheep, and [when fighting] against a brave man [he’s] a sheep himself.
  • Мя́гко сте́лет, да жёстко спать.
    • Transliteration: Myaghko stelet, da zhostko spat.
    • Translation: [He] makes the bed soft, yet [it’s] hard to sleep [on].
    • Meaning: Iron fist in a velvet glove. — Also: Things built without effort are hard to use.
    • English equivalent: Iron fist in a velvet glove; Velvet paws hide sharp claws.
  • Не ищи беды – беда сама тебя найдет
    • Translation: Don’t look for trouble – trouble will find you by itself.
    • English equivalent: Don’t trouble trouble until trouble troubles you.
    • Советские профсоюзы. Профиздат.. 1973. p. 45. Retrieved on 7 June 2013.
  • Не делай из мухи слона
    • Translation: Don’t make an elephant out of a fly.
    • English equivalent: Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.
    • “A fop sometimes gives important advice.”
    • Nicolas Boileau-Despréaux, L’Art Poétique, IV. 50. Reported in Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 10-11.
    • М. А. Котова. Фразеологический словарь русского языка для школьников. Рипол Классик. p. 155. ISBN 978-5-7905-3580-2. Retrieved on 7 June 2013.
  • На безры́бье и рак — ры́ба [, на безлю́дье и си́день — челове́к].
    • Transliteration: Na bezryb’ye i rak — ryba [, na bezlyud’ye i siden’ chelovek].
    • Translation: On a fishing lull, even a crayfish is fish [, at the lack of people even a lazybones is a man].
    • Meaning: Maybe this is not the best choice, but it’s our only option.
    • English equivalent: Something is better than nothing.
    • See also: Из двух зол выбира́ют ме́ньшее, Го́лод не тётка (, пирожка́ не поднесёт)
    • Modern Mockery: “На безрыбье и сам раком станешь” (On a fishing lull, you’ll even (wordplay): 1) become a crayfish yourself; 2) assume kneeling position.)
  • На Бо́га наде́йся, а сам не плоша́й.
    • Transliteration: Na boga nadeysya, a sam ne ploshay.
    • Translation: Hope for God, but do not be reliant.
    • English equivalent: Trust in God, but lock your car.
    • Compare: Бо́гу моли́сь, а добра́-ума́ держи́сь; Бережёного Бог бережёт.
  • На брю́хе шёлк, а в брю́хе щёлк.
    • Transliteration: Na bryukhe sholk, a v bryukhe scholk.
    • Translation: On the belly there is silk, but in the belly – just a click.
    • English equivalent: All hat and no cattle.
  • На вкус и цвет това́рищей нет.
    • Transliteration: Na vkus i tsvet tovarischey net.
    • Translation: There are no friends in tastes and colours.
    • English equivalent: There is no accounting for taste.
    • Compare: У вся́кого Па́вла своя́ пра́вда; О вку́сах не спо́рят.
    • יוסף גורי, I. Guri (2006). On the tip of the tongue: 500 Yiddish proverbs (illustrated ed.). Hebreisher Uniṿersiṭeṭ in Yerushalayim, Opṭeyl far Rusishe limudim. p. 226. ISBN 9659025033.
  • На во́ре ша́пка гори́т.
    • Transliteration: Na vore shapka gorit.
    • Translation: A thief’s hat burns.
    • English equivalent: A guilty mind betrays itself.
  • На всех не угоди́шь
    • Transliteration: Na vsekh ne ugodish.
    • Translation: You cannot please everybody.
    • English equivalent: He who pleased everybody died before he was born.
    • Compare: О вку́сах не спо́рят.
  • На вся́кого мудреца́ дово́льно простоты́.
    • Transliteration: Na vsyakogo mudretsa dovol’no prostoty.
    • Translation: Any wise man has enough of simplicity.
    • Meaning: Any experience person can be fooled.
    • Compare: И на старуху бывает проруха. Конь о четырёх ногах, а спотыкается.
  • Назва́лся гру́здем — полеза́й в ку́зов.
    • Transliteration: Nazvalsya gruzdem — polezay v kuzov.
    • Translation: If you called yourself a milk-mushroom — get into the basket!
    • Meaning: If you make a claim, be ready to prove it; If you made a promise, do not take it back
    • English equivalent: In for a penny, in for a pound [?], If you undertook some thing, do it (see it through); If the shoe fits, …; If you pledge, don’t hedge.
    • Compare: Взя́лся за гуж — не говори́, что не дюж.
    • See also: Лю́бишь ката́ться, люби́ и са́ночки вози́ть.
    • Modern mockery: Назва́лся ку́зовом — принима́й гру́зди. (If you called yourself a basket — get ready to take in the milk-mushrooms). Назва́лся гру́здем – лечи́сь да́льше. (If you called yourself a milk-mushroom — keep on your treatment.)
  • На кривой суд образца нет.
    • Translation: There is no example for an unjust court.
  • На ловца́ и зверь бежи́т.
    • Transliteartion: Na lovtsa i zver’ bezhit.
    • Translation: Prey runs into a trapper.
    • English equivalent: Speak of the devil, and he appears.
    • Compare: Про се́рого речь, а се́рый — навстре́чь.
  • На миру́ и смерть красна́.
    • Transliteration: Na miru i smert’ krasna.
    • Translation: With company, even death loses its sting.
  • На то и щу́ка [в мо́ре], что́бы кара́сь не дрема́л.
    • Transliteration: Na to i schuka v more, shtoby karas’ ne dremal.
    • Translations: The pike in the sea is there to make the crucian to stay alert.
    • Meaning: There are dangers, but don’t complain about them, stay alert.
  • На чужо́й карава́й рот не разева́й.
    • Transliteration: Na chuzhoy karavay rot ne razevay.
    • Translation: Don’t open your mouth [to eat] other people’s bread.
    • Modern Mockery (vulgar): “На чужое бухло не разевай ебло.”
  • Нашла́ коса́ на ка́мень.
    • Transliteration: Nashla kosa na kamen’.
    • Translation: The scythe has hit a stone.
    • English equivalent: Diamond cut diamond, You have met your match.
  • На языке́ мёд, а на се́рдце — лёд.
    • Transliteration: Na yazyke myod, a na serdtse — lyod.
    • Translation: On the tongue [there’s] honey, and on the heart [there’s] ice.
    • English equivalent: A honey tongue, a heart of gall.
  • Не бо́ги горшки́ обжига́ют.
    • Transliteration: Ne bogi gorshki obzhigayut.
    • Translation: [It’s] not gods [who] make pots.
    • Meaning: All arificial objects in the world, no matter how minute or astonishing, were made by people, so do not get overexcited.
  • Не бо́йся соба́ки, что ла́ет, а бо́йся той, что молчи́т и хвосто́м виля́ет.
    • Transliteration: Ne boysya sobaki, shto layet, a bosya toy, shto molchit, da khvostom vilyayet.
    • Translation: Don’t be afraid of the dog who barks, but be afraid of the one, who is silent and wags its tail.
    • English equivalent: It’s the quiet ones you gotta watch.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
  • Не́ было бы сча́стья, да несча́стье помогло́.
    • Transliteration: Ne bylo by schast’ya, da neschast’ye pomoglo
    • Translation: [I] would have had no luck, if not for misfortune.
    • Meaning: This particular misfortune in the end has led me to more gain than it made harm.
    • Compare: Нет ху́да без добра́.
  • Не́ было у ба́бы хлопо́т, так купи́ла порося́.
    • Transliteration: Ne bylo u baby khlopot, tak kupila porosya.
    • Translation: The woman had no trouble, so she bought a piglet.
    • English equivalent: You’ve asked for trouble.
  • Не всё коту́ ма́сленица, бу́дет и вели́кий пост.
    • Transliteration: Ne vsyo kotu maslenitsa, budet i velikiy post.
    • Translation: Not every day is a Shrovetide, in time it will be a Lent.
    • English equivalent: Life’s not all beer and skittles; Life’s not all wine and roses; I never promised you a bed of roses
  • Не всё то зо́лото, что блести́т.
    • Transliteration: Ne vsyo to zoloto, chto blestit.
    • Translation: Not every glittering thing is gold.
    • English equivalent: Not all that glitters is gold.
    • Modern mockery: Не всё то долото́, что блести́т.
    • English equivalent: All that glitters is not gold.
    • Meaning: An attractive appearance may be deceptive. It may cover or hide a much less favourable content.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 114. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • G.K. Chesterton (January 2013). Жив-человек. Издательство Pubmix.com. p. 22. ISBN 978-5-4241-1474-8. Retrieved on 18 June 2013.
  • Не говори́ гоп, пока́ не переско́чишь (перепры́гнешь).
    • Transliteration: Ne govori gop, poka ne pereskochish (pereprygnesh).
    • Translation: Don’t say “hop”, until you jumped over
    • English equivalent: Don’t count your chickens before they hatch;
    • Compare: Дели́ть шку́ру неуби́того медве́дя.
  • Не да́вши сло́ва — крепи́сь, а да́вши — держи́сь.
    • Transliteration: Ne davshi slova — krepis’, a davshi — derzhis’.
    • Meaning: Don’t give promises you can’t fulfil; once given, the word must be kept.
    • English equivalent: Don’t make a promise you can’t keep.
    • Compare: Угово́р доро́же де́нег.
  • Не за то во́лка бьют, что сер, а за то, что овцу́ съел.
    • Transliteration: Ne za to volka b’yut, shto ser, a za to, shto ovtsy s’yel.
    • Translation: The wolf is beaten not for being grey, but for having eaten a sheep.
  • Не зна́я бро́ду, не су́йся в во́ду.
    • Transliteration: Ne znaya brodu, ne suysya v vodu.
    • Translation: Don’t wade into a river without knowing a ford.
    • Meaning: Don’t rush into something without throughly studying the matter first.
    • English equivalent: Wait for the cat to jump.
  • Не име́й дру́га пота́тчика, а име́й дру́га попере́чника.
    • Transliteration: Ne imey druga potatchika, a imey druga poperechnika.
    • Translation: Don’t have a friend who always agrees with you, but have a friend who argues with you.
  • Не ме́сто кра́сит челове́ка, а челове́к — ме́сто.
    • Transliteration: Ne mesto krasit cheloveka, a chelovek — mesto.
    • Translations: Not the place adorns the man, but a man adorns the place.
  • Не мечи́те би́сер пе́ред сви́ньями.
    • Transliteration: Ne mechite biser pered svin’yami
    • Translation: Don’t cast beads before(in front of) pigs.
    • English equivalent: Cast not your pearls before swine.
    • “Jesus’ instruction to His apostles on how to handle rejection was to simply go elsewhere. There are other people who need to hear the gospel, and they are ready to hear it.”
    • What did Jesus mean when He said to not cast your pearls before swine (Matthew 7:6)? Retrieved 2017-04-21
    • Станислав Брехов (2017). Смертельная печаль. Саби-си.
  • Не ошиба́ется тот, кто ничего́ не де́лает.
    • Transliteration: Ne oshibayetsa tot, kto nichego ne delayet.
    • Translation: Only he who does nothing makes no mistakes.
    • English equivalent: Nothing ventured, nothing gained; He that never climbed, never fell.
  • Не плюй в коло́дец — пригоди́тся [воды] напи́ться.
    • Transliteration: Ne plyuy v kolodets — prigoditsya [vody] napit’sya.
    • Translation: Do not spit into a well—it may be useful to drink water.
    • English equivalent: Actions can boomerang; Never cast dirt into that fountain of which you have sometime drunk; Don’t bite the hand that feeds you.
    • Vulgar: Don’t sh*t where you eat.
    • Modern mockery: Не плюй в коло́дец: вы́летит — не пойма́ешь.
  • Не по́йман — не во́р.
    • Transliteration: Ne poyman — ne vor.
    • Translation: Unless caught [stealing], [one is] not a thief.
    • English equivalent: Steal, but do not get caught.
  • Не рой друго́му я́му, сам в неё попадёшь.
    • Transliteration: Ne roy drugomu yamu, sam v neyo popadyosh.
    • Translation: Don’t dig a pit for somebody [to fall into], [or] you will end up in it yourself.
    • English equivalent: Curses like chickens come home to roost.
    • Modern mockery: Не рой друго́му я́му, пусть сам ро́ет (Don’t dig a pit for somebody, let him dig [it] himself)
  • Не спра́шивай ста́рого, спра́шивай быва́лого.
    • Transliteration: Ne sprashivay starovo, sprashivy byvalogo.
    • Translation: Don’t ask the old one, ask the experienced one.
  • Нет ды́ма без огня́.
    • Transliteration: Net dyma bez ognya.
    • Translation: There is no smoke without fire.
    • English equivalent: There is no smoke without fire.
  • Нет ху́да без добра́.
    • Transliteration: Net khuda bez dobra.
    • Translation: There’s no bad without the good.
    • English equivalent: Every cloud has a silver lining.
    • Compare: Не́ было бы сча́стья, да несча́стье помогло́.
  • Ни к селу́, ни к го́роду.
    • Transliteration: Ni k selu, ni k gorodu.
    • Translation: Not for village, not for town.
    • Meaning: Not useful for anything.
    • English equivalent: Neither here nor there
  • Ни ры́ба, ни мя́со [ни кафтан, ни ряса].
    • Transliteration: Ni ryba, ni myaso.
    • Translation: Neither fish nor meat.
    • Usage: A person without a strong character.
    • English equivalent: Neither fish nor flesh.
  • Но́вая метла по-но́вому метёт.
    • Transliteration: Novaya metla po-novomu metyot.
    • Translation: A new broom sweeps in a new way.
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
    • English equivalent: A new broom sweeps clean.; In with the new and out with the old.
  • Обе́щанного три го́да ждут.
    • Transliteration: Obeschannovo tri goda zhdut.
    • Translation: [They] wait three years for [what was] promised.
    • Meaning: Promises aren’t usually carried out immediately.
  • Обже́гшись на молоке́, ду́ют на́ воду.
    • Transliteration:
    • Translation: He who got burned by hot milk, blows on water.
    • English equivalent: Once bitten, twice shy.
    • Mockery: На молоке обжёгся, а водку дует (He got burned by hot milk, but drinks vodka)
  • Овчи́нка вы́делки не сто́ит.
    • Transliteration: Ovchinka vydelki ne stoit.
    • Translation: Lambskin is not worth currying.
    • English equivalent: The game isn’t worth the candle.
  • Оди́н в по́ле [—] не во́ин.
    • Transliteration: Odin v pole ne voin.
    • Translation: A single [man] in a field is not a warrior.
    • English equivalent: One man, no man
  • Оди́н с со́шкой — се́меро с ло́жкой.
    • Transliteration: Odin s soshkoy — semero s lozhkoy.
    • Translation: [For every] one with a plow — [there’s] seven with a spoon.
    • Meaning: There’s a lot of slackers for each productive worker.
  • Оди́н сын – не сын, два сы́на – по́лсына, три сы́на – сын.
    • Transliteration: Odin syn – ne syn, dva syna – polsyna, tri syna – syn.
    • Translation: One son is not a son, two sons are half a son, three sons are a son.
  • Одна́ ча́рка – на здоро́вье, друга́я – на весе́лье, тре́тья – на вздор.
    • Transliteration: Odna charka na zdorov’e, drugaya na vesel’e, tret’a na vzdor.
    • Translation: One cup (of liquor) is for health, second one is for fun, third one is for nothing.
  • От во́лка бежа́л, да на медве́дя попа́л.
    • Transliteration: Ot volka bezhal, da na medvedya popal.
    • Translation: I ran from the wolf but ran into a bear.
    • English equivalent: Out of the frying pan and into the fire.’
    • See also: Из огня́ да в полымя́.
  • От добра́ добра́ не и́щут.
    • Transliteration: Ot dobra dobra ne ishchut.
    • Translation: Do not look for [further] good from good.
    • English equivalent: Leave well enough alone.
    • Meaning: “Do not try to change or improve something that is satisfactory as it stands.”
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 147. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Мокиенко Валерий Михайлович (2010). Большой словарь русских пословиц. ОЛМА Медиа Групп. p. 278. ISBN 978-5-373-03250-6. Retrieved on 7 June 2013.
  • От трудо́в пра́ведных не наживёшь пала́т ка́менных.
    • Transliteration: Ot trudov pravednykh ne nazhivyosh palat kamennykh.
    • Translation: Honest work won’t let you live in a stone palace.
    • Meaning: Great wealth stems from illegal activities more often than not.
  • Охо́та пу́ще нево́ли.
    • Transliteration: Okhota pusche nevoli.
    • Translation: Desire is worse then compulsion.
    • English equivalent: A burden of one’s own choice is not felt.
    • Meaning: Work you enjoy never feels too hard.
  • Пей, да де́ло разуме́й.
    • Transliteration: Pey, da delo razumey.
    • Translation: Drink (alcohol), but be an expert in your business
  • Пе́рвый блин (всегда́) ко́мом.
    • Transliteration: Pervyy blin (vsegda) komom.
    • Translation: The first pancake is (always) a blob.
    • English equivalent: You have to learn to crawl before you can learn to walk.
    • Swedish equivalent: We are children in the beginning.
    • Compare: Лиха́ беда́ нача́ло.
  • Пло́х тот солда́т, кото́рый не мечта́ет стать генера́лом.
    • Translation: A soldier who doesn’t dream of becoming a general is a bad one.
  • Пова́дился кувши́н по́ воду ходи́ть, тут ему́ и го́лову сломи́ть.
    • Transliteration: Povadilsya kuvshin po vodu kxodit’, tut yemu i golovu slomit’.
    • English equivalent: The pitcher goes often to the well but is broken eventually.
  • Пови́нную го́лову и меч не сечёт.
    • Transliteration: Povinnuyu golovu i mech ne sechot.
    • Translation: Even the sword doesn’t cut the head of the one who confesses.
    • English equivalent: A fault confessed is half redressed.
  • Повторе́нье – мать уче́нья.
    • Transliteration: Povtoren’ye — mat’ uchen’ya.
    • Translation: Repetition is the mother of learning.
    • English equivalent: Practice makes perfect.
    • Meaning: The more often you repeat your lesson, the more likely you are to memorize it.
    • Mockery: Повторе́нье – мать пита́нья (Repetition is a mother of feeding); Повторенье — мать ученья, а заикание — отец (Repetition is the mother of learning and sluttering is the father).
  • Пожале́л волк кобы́лу, оста́вил хвост да гри́ву.
    • Transliteration: Pozhalel volk kobylu, ostavil khvost da grivu
    • Translation: The wolf spared the mare, left a tail and mane.
  • Поживём – увидим.
    • Transliteration: Pozhivom – uvidim.
    • Translation: Wait and see.
  • По одёжке встреча́ют, по уму́ провожа́ют.
    • Transliteration: Po odyozhke vstrechayut, po umu provozhayut.
    • Translation: One meets/greets [people] by their clothes, and says farewell by their mind.
    • English equivalent: Beauty may open the door, but only virtue enters.
  • Посади́ свинью́ за стол — она́ и но́ги на сто́л
    • Transliteration: Posadi svin’yu za stol — ona i nogi na stol.
    • Translation: Seat the pig at the table — she’ll put [her] legs on the table.
    • English equivalent: Give one an inch, and he will take a mile.
    • See also: [Ему́] па́льца(па́лец) в рот не клади́( — (всю) ру́ку отку́сит).
  • По́сле дра́ки кулака́ми не ма́шут.
    • Transliteration: Posle draki kulakami ne mashut.
    • Translation: They don’t swing fists when the fight is over.
    • English equivalent: What’s done is done; Don’t lock the stable door after the horse has bolted.
  • Поспеши́шь – люде́й насмеши́шь.
    • Transliteration: Pospeshish’ – lyudey nasmeshish’.
    • Translation: If you rush things, you’ll only make others laugh.
    • English equivalent: Haste makes waste.
  • Привычка – вторая натура
    • Translation: Habit is second nature.
    • English equivalent: Old habits die hard.
    • Ом (January 2013). По ту сторону. Теория и практика универсального подхода. Издательство Pubmix.com. p. 321. ISBN 978-5-458-22961-6. Retrieved on 7 June 2013.
  • Простота́ ху́же воровства́.
    • Transliteration: Prostota khuzhe vorovstva.
    • Translation: Simplicity is worse than thievery (crime).
    • Meaning: A fool can do more damage than an enemy/a criminal.
  • Пу́ганая воро́на куста́ (теле́жного скри́па/со́бственной те́ни) бои́тся.
    • Transliteration: Puganaya vorona kusta (telezhnogo skripa/sobstvennoj teni) boitsya.
    • Translation: A spooked crow is afraid of a bush (a carriage [wheel’s] squeak/its own shadow).
    • English equivalent: Once bitten, twice shy
    • Compare: Обже́гшись на молоке́, ду́ют на́ воду.
  • Пья́ному мо́ре по коле́но (, а лу́жа — по́ уши).
    • Transliteration: P’yanomu more po koleno (, a luzha – po ushi).
    • Translation: For a drunk, the sea is knee-deep (, and a puddle ear-deep).
    • Meaning: Drunk people brag a lot, yet are capable of very little.
  • Поговорка – цветок, пословица – ягодка.
    • English equivalent: A saying is a flower, a proverb is a berry.
    • Meaning: Thus a saying may be any widely used metaphor, simile or the like which aptly describes a specific occurrence or concept and which is admired for its charm, while a proverb is something that can, as it were, be eaten and digested.
  • Работа не волк – в лес не убежит.
    • Transliteration: Rabota ne volk – v les ne ubezhit.
    • Translation: Work is not a wolf, it’s not going away to the forest.
    • English equivalent: You can do any job later.
    • Krylov, Konstantin Arkadʹevich (1973). Russian-English Dictionary of Russian Sayings and Proverbs. C.A. Krylov. p. VII.
  • Раз на раз не прихо́дится.
    • Transliteration: Raz na raz ne prikhoditsya.
    • Translation: Each time it’s different.
    • English equivalent: You can’t expect perfection every time.
  • Рука́ ру́ку мо́ет [, вор во́ра кр́оет].
    • Transliteration: Ruka ruku moyet[, vor vora kroyet].
    • Translation: Hands wash each other[, a thief covers another thief].
    • English equivalent: You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours. ; One hand washes the other.
  • Ры́ба и́щет, где глу́бже, а челове́к — где лу́чше.
    • Transliteration: Ryba ischet gde glubzhe, a chelovek — gde luchshe.
    • Translation: Fish seek a deep place, men seek a better place.
    • Modern mockery: Ры́ба и́щет, где глу́бже, а челове́к — где ры́ба. (Fish seek for a deep place, men seek for a fishing place.)
  • Рыба́к рыбака́ ви́дит издалека́.
    • Transliteration: Rybak rybaka vidit izdaleka.
    • Translation: A fisherman can tell another fisherman from afar.
    • English equivalent: It takes one to know one.
    • Mockery: Дурак дурака видит издалека. (A fool can tell another fool from afar.)
  • С волка́ми жить, по-во́лчьи выть.
    • Transliteration: S volkami zhit’, po-volch’i vyt’.
    • Translation: To live with wolves, you have to howl like a wolf.
    • English equivalent: Who keeps company with the wolves, will learn to howl; You are like the company you keep; When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
    • Compare: С кем поведёшься, от того́ и наберёшься.
  • Своя́ но́ша не тя́нет.
    • Transliteration: Svoya nosha ne tyanet.
    • Translation: [One’s] own burden doesn’t encumber.
    • English equivalent: A burden of one’s own choice is not felt
  • Своя́ руба́шка бли́же к те́лу.
    • Transliteration: Svoya rubashka blizhe k telu.
    • Translation: [One’s] own shirt [is] closer to the body.
    • Meaning: One is much more likely to protect one’s own property than anybody else’s.
    • See also: Всяк кули`к своё боло`то хва`лит.
  • Свя́то ме́сто пу́сто не быва́ет.
    • Transliteration: Svyato mesto pusto ne byvayet.
    • Translation: A holy place is never empty.
    • English equivalent: Nature abhors a vacuum; The throne is never vacant
  • С глаз доло́й — из се́рдца вон.
    • Transliteration: S glaz doloy — iz serdtsa von.
    • Translation: Out of sight, out of heart.
    • English equivalent: Out of sight, out of mind.
    • Contrast: Да́льше с глаз – бли́же к се́рдцу.
  • Седина́ в бо́роду, бес в ребро́.
    • Transliteration: Sedina v borodu, bes v rebro.
    • Translation: Grey hair into beard, devil into rib.
    • Meaning: When a man gets elderly, he often becomes a womanizer.
  • Се́меро одного́ не ждут.
    • Transliteration: Semero odnogo ne zhdut.
    • Translation: Seven [people] don’t wait for one.
    • English equivalent: For one that is missing there’s no spoiling a wedding.
    • Meaning: If you severely hinder others, don’t be surprised when you get left behind.
  • Семь бед — оди́н отве́т.
    • Transliteration: Sem’ bed — odin otvet.
    • Translation: Seven troubles – one responce.
    • English equivalent: As well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb.
  • Семь вёрст до небе́с и всё ле́сом.
    • Transliteration: Sem’ vyorst do nebes, i vcyo lesom.
    • Translation: Seven versts# to heaven, and all the way through the forest.
    • Meaning: A lot of fables or promises.
  • Семь раз отме́рь, оди́н отре́жь.
    • Transliteration: Sem’ raz otmer’, odin otrezh.
    • Translation: Measure seven times, cut once.
    • English equivalent: Measure thrice, cut once.
    • Howlett, Colin (1997). The Oxford Russian dictionary (2, revised ed.). Oxford University Press. p. 1252.
  • Семь топоро́в вме́сте лежа́т, а две пря́лки врозь.
    • Transliteration: Sem toporov vmeste lezhat, a dve pryalki vroz.
    • Translation: Seven axes lie together, two distaffs apart
    • Meaning: Men tend to co-operate, but women – to compete.
  • С кем поведёшься, от того́ и наберёшься.
    • Transliteration: S kem povedyoshsya, ot togo i naberyoshsya.
    • Translation: [You’ll] learn [(in a bad way)] from those [you] hang out with.
    • English equivalent: Those who sleep with dogs will rise with fleas; You are what your friends are.
    • Modern mockery: С кем поведёшься, с тем и наберёшься. (You’ll get drunk with those you hang out with.)
    • Compare: С волка́ми жить, по-во́лчьи выть.
  • Ско́лько во́лка ни корми́, он всё в лес смо́трит.
    • Transliteration: Skol’ko volka ne kormi, on vsyo v les smotrit.
    • Translation: However [much/ well] you feed the wolf, he still looks at the woods.
    • English equivalent: A leopard can’t change his spots.
    • Compare: Горбатого могила исправит.
    • Mockery: Ско́лько во́лка не корми́, он всё жрёт и жрёт (However much you feed the wolf, he still eats and eats.)
  • Ско́ро ска́зка ска́зывается, да не ско́ро де́ло де́лается.
    • Transliteration: Skoro skazka skazyvayetsya, da ne skoro delo delaetsya.
    • Translations: A tale is told quickly, but the job is done slowly.
    • English equivalent: Talk is cheap.
  • Сла́вны бу́бны за гора́ми (а к нам приду́т, как луко́шко).
    • Transliteration: Slavny bubny za gorami, (a k nam pridut, kak lukoshko).
    • Translations: Tambourines are good when they are behind mountains (, and when they come to us, they become just like a basket)
    • Meaning: Don’t believe in any story or promise.
  • Сло́во — се́ребро, молча́ние — зо́лото.
    • Transliteration: Slovo — serebro, molchaniye — zoloto.
    • Translation: Words are silver, silence is gold.
    • English equivalent: Talk is cheap, silence is golden.
  • Слу́хом земля́ по́лнится.
    • Transliteration: Slukhom zemlya polnitsya.
    • Translation: A rumour fills the Earth.
    • English equivalent: News spreads like wildfire; News flies fast.
    • See also: Дурна́я молва́ на кры́льях лети́т; Худы́е ве́сти не сидя́т на ме́сте.
  • С ми́ру по ни́тке — го́лому руба́ха.
    • Transliteration: S miru po nitke — golomu rubakha.
    • Translation: One thread from [everyone in] the world — [makes a] shirt for [the] naked.
    • English equivalent: Little things make a big difference.
    • Meaning: If many people will donate even a little bit each, it will make a huge difference for the recipient.
    • World War II mockery: С миру по нитке — Гитлеру верёвка (One thread from everyone in the world makes a noose for Hitler). Source: За край свой насмерть стой. Сборник пословиц и поговорок. Составители Жигулев А. М., Кузнецов Н. П. — М.: Воениздат, 1974
    • See also: Я́годка по я́годке – бу́дет кузово́к.
  • Соловья́ ба́снями не ко́рмят.
    • Transliteration: Solov’ya basnyami ne kormyat.
    • Translation: The nightingale can’t be fed by fables.
    • English equivalent: Fine words butter no parsnips.
    • Offord, Derek (1996). Using Russian: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 156. ISBN 0521457602.
  • Сня́вши го́лову, по волоса́м не пла́чут.
    • Transliteration: Snyavshi golovu, po volosam ne plachut.
    • Translation: After taking off the head one doesn’t (shouldn’t) grieve over the hair.
    • English equivalent: What’s done is done.
  • Соба́ка на се́не: и сама́ не ест, и други́м не даёт.
    • Transliteration: Sobaka na sene: i sama ne yest i drugim ne dayot.
    • Translation: A dog on hay will neither eat it himself, nor let others eat it.
    • English equivalent: A dog in the manger.
  • Соро́ка на хвосте́ принесла́.
    • Transliteraton: Soroka na khvoste prinesla.
    • Translation: A magpie brought it on its tail.
    • English equivalent: A little bird told me.
  • Ста́рость – не ра́дость.
    • Transliteration: Starost’ – ne radost’.
    • Translation: Old age is no fun.
    • Modern mockery: Старость не радость, маразм не оргазм (Old age is no fun, marasmus is not orgasm)
    • English equivalent: An old ape has an old eye; Old age, boy, is no joy.
  • Ста́рый друг лу́чше но́вых двух.
    • Transliteration: Staryy drug luchshe novykh dvukh.
    • Translation: An old friend is better than two new ones.
    • Compare: За одного́ би́того двух неби́тых даю́т.
  • Суженого конем не объедешь
    • Transliteration: Suzhenogo konyom ne ob”edyesh.
    • Translation: You can’t escape your fate [even] with a horse.
    • Meaning: You can’t change your fate.
  • Сы́тый голо́дного не разуме́ет: одному́ суп жи́дкий, друго́му – же́мчуг ме́лкий.
    • Transliteration: Sytyy golodnogo ne razumeyet: odnomy sup zhidkiy, drugomu – zhemchug melkiy.
    • Translation: The sated one doesn’t understand the hungry one: for one the soup is too thin, for the other – the pearls are too small.
    • English equivalent: He that is warm thinks all so.
  • Там хорошо́, где нас нет.
    • Transliteration: Tam khorosho, gde nas net.
    • Translation: It’s good there, where we are not.
    • English equivalent: On the other side grass is greener.
  • Твои́ми бы уста́ми да мёд пить.
    • Transliteration: Tvoimi by ustami da myod pit’.
    • Translation: [I’d like to] drink honey with your lips.
    • Meaning: The way you describe it, this story/plan/thing sounds too good to be true.
    • Compare: Гла́дко бы́ло на бума́ге, да забы́ли про овра́ги(, а по ним шага́ть).
  • Терпе́ние и труд всё перетру́т.
    • Transliteration: Terpeniye i trud vsyo peretrut.
    • Translation: Patience and work will fray through anything.
    • Compare: Я́годка по я́годке – бу́дет кузово́к.; Исподво́ль и ольху́ согнёшь.
    • English equivalent: Time works wonders; He that can have patience can have what he wants.
    • See also: Ти́ше е́дешь — да́льше бу́дешь.
  • Терпи́, каза́к, атама́ном бу́дешь.
    • Transliteration: Terpi kazak, atamanom budesh.
    • Translation: Put up with it cossack, and you’ll be an ataman.
    • English equivalent: No pain, no gain; Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
    • Alexander Margulis; Asya Kholodnaya (February 2000). Russian-English dictionary of proverbs and sayings. McFarland. p. 215–. ISBN 978-0-7864-0703-3. Retrieved on 22 May 2013.
  • Тише едешь, дальше будешь
    • English equivalent: Slow and steady wins the race.
    • Ом (January 2013). По ту сторону. Теория и практика универсального подхода. Издательство Pubmix.com. p. 321. ISBN 978-5-458-22961-6. Retrieved on 7 June 2013.
  • Ти́ше е́дешь — да́льше бу́дешь.
    • Transliteration: Tishe yedesh — dal’she budesh.
    • Translation: Ride slower — [you’ll] get further.
    • Meaning: You will accomplish more if you do things methodically. — Also: Don’t rush things.
    • Compare: Я́годка по я́годке – бу́дет кузово́к.; Исподво́ль и ольху́ согнёшь.
    • See also: Терпе́ние и труд всё перетру́т.
    • English equivalent: Slow and steady wins the race.
  • Тону́л – топо́р сули́л, а как вы́тащили – и топори́ща жаль (ста́ло).
    • Transliteration: Tonul – topor sulil, a kak vytschili – i toporoscha zhal’ (stalo).
    • Translation: While [he] was sinking, [he] promised [me] an axe [if I save him], but when pulled [ashore], [he] begrudged even an axe handle.
    • Meaning: People often don’t keep their promises.
    • See also: Угово́р доро́же де́нег.
  • Труд челове́ка ко́рмит, а лень — по́ртит.
    • Transliteration: Trud cheloveka kormit, a len’ — portit.
    • Translation: A job feeds a man, laziness spoils him.
  • Ты бли́же к де́лу, а он про козу́ бе́лу.
    • Transliteration: Ty blizhe k delu, a on pro kozu belu.
    • Translation: You get on with business, though he [keeps telling you] about a white goat.
    • Meaning: Stop beating around the bush.
  • Убы́ток — уму́ прибы́ток.
    • Translitertion: Ubytok — umu pribytok.
    • Translation: A loss is a gain for the mind.
    • Meaning: Experience is worth it.
    • English equivalent: Winning is earning, losing is learning., Sadder but wiser
  • У ба́бы во́лос до́лог, да ум ко́роток.
    • Translitertion: U baby volos dolog, da um korotok.
    • Translation: A woman’s hair is long, and her mind short.
  • У стра́ха глаза́ велики́.
    • Translation: Fear has big eyes.
    • ** Жуков, В. П.; Жуков, Влас Платонович (1993). Slovarʹ russkikh poslovit︠s︡ i pogovorok. Русский язык. p. 174. ISBN 5200022371.
  • Угово́р доро́же де́нег.
    • Translitertion: Ugovor dorozhe deneg.
    • Translation: The agreement(contract) costs more than money.
    • Meaning: You must keep your word, even if doing so costs you money.
    • Compare: Не да́вши сло́ва — крепи́сь, а да́вши — держи́сь.
    • English equivalent: A bargain is a bargain.
  • Уката́ли Си́вку круты́е го́рки.
    • Transliteration: Ukatali Sivku krutyye gorki.
    • Translation: Steep hills exhausted Sivka (ash-grey horse).
  • Укоро́тишь – не воро́тишь.
    • Transliteration: Ukorotish – ne vorotish.
    • Translations: If you cut [it], you won’t get it back.
  • Ули́та е́дет, когда́-то бу́дет.
    • Translitertion: Ulita yedet, kogda-to budet.
    • Translation: The snail is coming, who knows when it arrives.
    • Compare: Когда рак на горе свистнет. Обещанного три года ждут.
  • У́мная голова́, да дураку́ доста́лась.
    • Transliteration: Umnaya golova, da duraku dostalas’.
    • Translation: A clever head, but given to foolishness.
  • У́мные ре́чи прия́тно и слу́шать.
    • Transliteration: Umnyye rechi priyatno i slushat’.
    • Translation: A clever speech (speaker) is pleasant to listen to.
  • У семи́ ня́нек дитя́ без гла́зу.
    • Transliteration: U semi nyanek ditya bez glazu.
    • Translation: Seven nannies make a kid not looked after.
    • Meaning: If too many people are working on the same project, everybody will expect that another one will do the actual job.
    • English equivalent: Everybody’s business is nobody’s business.
  • Ус в честь, а борода́ и у козла́ есть.
    • Transliteration: Us v chest’ a boroda i u kozla yest’
    • Translation: Moustaches are respected, and beards worn even by goats.
    • English equivalent: If the beard were all, the goat might preach.
  • Услу́жливый дура́к опа́снее врага́.
    • Transliteration: Usluzhlivyy durak opasnee vraga.
    • Translation: Complacent fool harms worse than enemy.
    • English equivalent: A foolish friend is like an open enemy.
    • Somali equivalent: Doqoni sokeeye ma aha.
    • Translation: A fool is not a kinsman.
    • “A fool sees not the same tree that a wise man sees.”
    • William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1790–1793).
  • Уста́ми младе́нца глаго́лет и́стина.
    • Transliteration: Ustami mladentsa glagolet istina.
    • Translation: Truth is spoken from the toddler’s mouth; From the mouth of babes
    • English equivalent: Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings come great truth.
    • “Even the youngest of us may be wrong sometimes.”
    • George Bernard Shaw, Love Among the Artists (1900)
  • У стра́ха глаза́ велики́.
    • Transliteration: U strakha glaza veliki.
    • Translation: Fear has large eyes.
    • Meaning: People tend to overestimate the danger when scared.
    • Compare: Не так стра́шен чёрт, как его́ малю́ют; Глаза́ боя́тся, а ру́ки де́лают
  • Утопа́ющий за соло́минку хвата́ется.
    • Transliteration: Utopayuschiy i za solominku khvatayetsya.
    • Translation: A drowning man grabs even a straw.
    • English equivalent: A drowning man will cling to a straw.
  • У́тро ве́чера мудрене́е.
    • Transliteration: Utro vechera mudreneye.
    • Translation: Morning is wiser than the evening.
    • Meaning: One should make important decisions in the morning (i.e. after getting some sleep/rest) rather than in the evening.
    • English equivalent: I need to sleep on it.
    • Very common in fairy tales, such as The Frog-Tzarevna and Vasilisa the Fair.
  • Уче́нье свет, а неуче́нье тьма.
    • Transliteration: Uchen’ye cvet, a neuchen’ye t’ma.
    • Translation: Studying is light; not studying is darkness.
    • English equivalent: Knowledge is power.
    • Variations: “Ученье свет, а неученых тьма.” (Studying is light; there are many people who don’t study. It’s a play on the word тьма which can mean “many” or “darkness.”)
  • Хвали́лась сини́ца мо́ре заже́чь.
    • Transliteration: Khvalilas’ sinitsa more zazhech.
    • Translation: The titmouse boasted of putting the sea on the fire..
    • Meaning: Your plan doesn’t hold water.
    • See also: Пья́ному мо́ре по коле́но (, а лу́жа — по́ уши).
  • Хвали́лся чёрт всем ми́ром владе́ть, а Бог ему́ и над свиньёй не дал вла́сти.
    • Transliteration: Khvalilsya chort vsem mirom vladet, a Bog yemu i nad svin’yoy ne dal vlasti.
    • Translation: The devil boasted of ruling the whole world, but God didn’t give him power over even the pig.
    • “The significant point is that people unfit for freedom — who cannot do much with it — are hungry for power. The desire for freedom is an attribute of a “have” type of self. It says: leave me alone and I shall grow, learn, and realize my capacities. The desire for power is basically an attribute of a “have-not” type of self. If Hitler had had the talents and the temperament of a genuine artist, if Stalin had had the capacity to become a first-rate theoretician, if Napoleon had had the makings of a great poet or philosopher they would hardly have developed the all-consuming lust for absolute power.
      Freedom gives us a chance to realize our human and individual uniqueness. Absolute power can also bestow uniqueness: to have absolute power is to have the power to reduce all the people around us to puppets, robots, toys, or animals, and be the only man in sight. Absolute power achieves uniqueness by dehumanizing others.
      To sum up: Those who lack the capacity to achieve much in an atmosphere of freedom will clamor for power.
    • Eric Hoffer, Working and Thinking on the Waterfront (1969), Journal entry (28 March 1959)
    • See also: Пья́ному мо́ре по коле́но (, а лу́жа — по́ уши).
  • Хва́стать – не коси́ть, спина́ не боли́т.
    • Transliteration: Khvastat’ – ne kosit’, spina ne bolit.
    • Translation: Bragging is unlike mowing; it won’t make your back ache.
    • Meaning: Bragging is one thing; doing the job is another.
    • Slang, rude (may be offensive): Пиздеть — не мешки ворочать (Pizdet’ – nye meshki vorochat’). To talk bullshit it’s not to roll over the bagful).
  • Хлеб всему́ голова́.
    • Transliteration: Khleb vsemu golova.
    • Translation: Bread is the head of everything.
    • English equivalent: Bread is the staff of life.
  • Хлеб за брю́хом не хо́дит (, а брю́хо за хле́бом).
    • Transliteration: Khleb za bryukhom ne khodit (, a bryukho za khlebom).
    • Translation: Bread doesn’t go for the belly (, but the belly goes for bread)..
    • See also: Го́лод не тётка (, пирожка́ не поднесёт).
  • Хлеб-соль ешь, а правду-матку режь.
    • Transliteration: Khleb-sol’ yesh, a pravdu-matku rezh.
    • Translations: Eat bread and salt, cut the mother truth
    • Meaning: Tell truth in any circumstances
  • Хоро́ший това́р сам себя́ хва́лит.
    • Translitertion: Khoroshiy tovar sam sebya khvalit.
    • Translation: Quality goods advertise themselves.
  • Хорошо тому жить, кому бабушка ворожит.
    • Transliteration: Khorosho tomu zhit’, komu babushka vorozhit.
    • Translation: The person whose Grandma tells fortunes is happy.
  • Хоть гол, да прав.
    • Transliteration: Khot’ gol, da prav.
    • Translation: Naked, but right
  • Хоть есть не́чего, да жить ве́село.
    • Transliteration: Khot’ yest’ nechego, da zhit’ veselo.
    • Translation: Although there’s nothing to eat, life is fun.
  • Хоть кол (ему́) на голове́ теши́.
    • Transliteration: Khot’ kol (yemu) na golove teshi.
    • Translation: [You could] even chop sticks on (his) head.
    • English equivalent: He is so pig-headed; Stubborn as a mule.
  • Хре́н ре́дьки не сла́ще.
    • Transliteration: Khren red’ki ne slasche.
    • Translation: Horseradish is no sweeter than radish.
    • Meaning: The proposed alternative is no better.
    • See also: Что в лоб, что по́ лбу; Что пнём об сову́, что сово́й об пень ( — всё одно́ сове́ несла́дко).
  • Худо́й мир лу́чше до́брой ссоры.
    • Transliteration: Khudoi mir luchshe dobroy ssory.
    • Translation: A bad peace is better than a good quarrel.
    • English equivalent: A bad compromise is better than a good lawsuit.
    • See also: Кому́ война́, а кому́ мать родна́.
  • Худы́е ве́сти не лежа́т на ме́сте.
    • Transliteration: Khudyye vesti ne lezhat na meste.
    • Translation: Bad news doesn’t rest peacefully.
    • Compare: Плоха́я молва́ на кры́льях лети́т.
  • Цыпля́т по о́сени счита́ют.
    • Transliteration: Tsiplyat po oseni schitayut.
    • Translation: One [should] count chicks in autumn.
    • English equivalent: Don’t count your chickens before they hatched.
  • Челове́к предполага́ет, а Бог располага́ет.
    • Transliteration: Chelovek predpolagayet, a Bog raspolagayet.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes, God disposes.
  • Чем бы дит́я ни те́шилось, ли́шь бы не пла́кало.
    • Transliteration: Chem by ditya ni teshilos’, lish by ne plakalo.
    • Translation: It doesn’t matter what the kid plays with as long as [he] doesn’t cry.
    • Modern mockery: Чем бы дит́я ни те́шилось, лишь бы не вешалось (It doesn’t matter what the kid plays with as long as [he] doesn’t hang himself.); Чем бы дит́я ни те́шилось, лишь бы в рот не брало (It doesn’t matter what the kid plays with as long as it’s not with oral sex.); Чем бы дит́я ни те́шилось, лишь бы по обоюдному согласию (It doesn’t matter what (whom) the kid plays with as long as it’s upon mutual agreement.); Чем бы дит́я ни те́шилось, лишь бы не руками. (It doesn’t matter what the kid plays with as long as it’s not with [his] hand.).
  • Чем да́льше в лес, тем бо́льше дров.
    • Transliteration: Chem dal’she v les, tem bol’she drov.
    • Translation: The further into the woods, the more firewood [you’ll encounter].
    • Meaning: The further you get into something, the greater gain you might expect (or the more obstacles you will encounter).
    • Modern mockery: Чем да́льше в лес, тем толще партизаны; Чем да́льше в лес, тем бли́же вы́лез (wordplay on similarly sounding “в лес”/”влез”).
  • Чему́ быть, того́ не минова́ть.
    • Transliteration: Chemu byt’, tomu ne minovat’.
    • Translation: Fate can’t be avoided.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes, God disposes.
    • “Plans are insulted destinies. I don’t have plans, I only have goals.”
    • Ash Chandler, Freudian SlipMumbai Mirror Buzz, April 2006.
    • Владимир Иванович Даль (1862). Пословицы русского народа. Изд. Императорскаго общества исторіи и древностей россійских при Московском университетѣ. p. 26.
  • Что бы́ло, то прошло́ (и быльём поросло́).
    • Transliteration: Chto bylo, to proshlo (i byl’yom poroslo).
    • Translation: What used to be – is [now] gone (and overgrown with grass).
    • See also: Кто ста́рое помя́нет, тому́ глаз вон; Э́то бы́ло давно́, и непра́вда.
  • Что в лоб, что по́ лбу.
    • Transliteration: Chto v lob, chto po lbu.
    • Meaning: It doesn’t make a difference. — Also: You’re dumb.
    • Compare: Что пнем об сову, что совой об пень ( — все одно сове несладко).
    • English equivalent: Six of one, half a dozen the other.
  • Что (ни) го́род, то но́ров.
    • Transliteration: Chto (ni) gorod, to norov.
    • Translation: Another city (town) – another temper.
    • Meaming: People are different.
  • Что име́ем — не храни́м, потеря́вши — пла́чем.
    • Transliteration: Chto imeyem — ne khranim, poteryabshi — plachem.
    • Translation: What we own, we don’t [safe]keep [properly]; when [we] lose [it], [we] cry.
    • English equivalent: You never miss the water till the well runs dry.
  • Что напи́сано перо́м — не вы́рубить топоро́м.
    • Transliteration: Chto napisano perom — ne vyrubit’ toporom.
    • Translation: What was written by a pen can’t be erased by an axe.
    • Meaning: What has been documented, cannot be changed [easily].
    • Compare: Сло́во – не воробе́й: вы́летит – не пойма́ешь.; Из пе́сни сло́ва не вы́кинешь.
    • Contrast: Бумага всё стерпит.
    • Modern mockery: Что написано топором – не вырубить пером. (Written by axe cannot be taken out with pen) — said by editors about poorly written articles.
  • Что посе́ешь, то и пожнёшь.
    • Transliteration: Chto posyeyesh’, to i pozhnyosh’.
    • Translation: What [you] plant, [you] will harvest.
    • English: You reap what you sow.
    • Compare: Как ау́кнется – так и откли́кнется; Пошёл за ше́рстью, а верну́лся стри́женым; За чем пойдёшь, то и найдёшь; Не рой друго́му я́му – сам в неё попадёшь.
  • Что с во́зу упа́ло, то пропа́ло.
    • Transliteration: Chto s vozu upalo, to propalo.
    • Translation: What fell off the cart is [as good as] gone.
    • Meaning: If you have lost (left behind/forgotten) something, expect to never see it again.
  • Что у тре́звого на уме́, то у пья́ного на языке́.
    • Transliteration: Chto u trezvogo na ume, u p’yanogo na yazyke.
    • Translation: What’s on sober’s mind, is on drunk’s tongue.
    • Meaning: Drunk people have poor self-control, often saying things they shouldn’t have said.
    • See also: Язы́к мой – враг мой (, пре́жде ума́ глаго́лет).
  • Чужа́я душа́ – потёмки.
    • Transliteration: Chuzhaya dusha – potyomki.
    • Translation: Another person’s soul is [in] darkness.
    • Meaning: You can’t know for sure what people think.
  • Чужу́ю беду́ рука́ми разведу́, а к свое́й ума́ не приложу́.
    • Transliteration: Chuzhuyu bedu rukami razvedyu, a k svoyey uma ne prilozhu.
    • Translation: [I can] push others’ problem away with my hands, but can’t put my [own] mind to my own problem.
    • Meaning: All problems seem to be easy to solve, unless they’re your own.
  • Чья́ бы коро́ва мыча́ла, а твоя́ бы молча́ла.
    • Transliteration: Ch’ya by korova mychala, a tvoya by molchala.
    • Translation: Another’s cow can moo, yours had best stay silent.
    • English equivalent: The pot calls the kettle black.
    • “I always pass on good advice. It is never of any use to oneself.”
    • Oscar Wilde, An Ideal Husband (1895), Act I.
    • See also: На зе́ркало не́ча пеня́ть, ко́ли ро́жа крива́; В чужо́м глазу́ сори́нку заме́тно, а в своём — бревна́ не вида́ть.
  • Ши́ла в мешке́ не утаи́шь.
    • Transliteration: Shila v meske ne utaish.
    • Translation: [You] cannot hide an awl in a sack.
    • Meaning: Truth will always be discovered, sooner or later.
    • Latin equivalent: Time discloses the truth
    • See also: Ско́лько верёвочке не ви́ться — коне́ц буде́т.
  • Это ещё цвето́чки, а я́годки впереди́.
    • Transliteration: Eto escho tsvetochki, a yagodki vperedi.
    • Translation: These are just flowers; berries will come soon.
    • Meaning: This is not all folks; things will get much worse/better soon.
    • Compare: Пришла́ беда́ – отворя́й ворота́, Лиха́ беда́ нача́ло.
  • вот где собака зарыта.
    • English equivalent: To smell a rat.
    • Уваров, Николай (2017). “6119”. Энциклопедия народной мудрости. Пословицы, поговорки, афоризмы, крылатые выражения, сравнения. Инфра-Инженерия. p. 210. ISBN 978-5-457-65172-2.
  • Я́блоко от я́блони недалеко́ па́дает.
    • Transliteration: Yabloko ot yabloni nedaleko padayet.
    • Translation: The apple falls not so far away from the apple-tree.
    • Meaning: A person is in many regards like his parents.
    • English equivalent: Like father like son; The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Язы́к до Кие́ва доведёт.
    • Transliteration: ‘Yazyk do Kieva dovedjot.
    • Translation: Your tongue will take you as far as Kiev.
    • Closest English equivalent: The only stupid question is the one not asked.
    • Meaning: If you want to know something, ask the people for it.
    • Offord, Derek (1996). Using Russian: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 155. ISBN 0521457602.
  • Язы́к мой – враг мой (, пре́жде ума́ глаго́лет).
    • Transliteration: Yazyk moy – vrag moy (, prezhde uma glagolet).
    • Translation: My tongue is my enemy (, speaks ahead of mind).
    • Meaning: I shouldn’t have said that.
    • See also: Что у тре́звого на уме́, то у пья́ного на языке́; И у стен быва́ют у́ши.
  • Я́йца ку́рицу не у́чат.
    • Transliteration: Yaytsa kuritsu ne uchat.
    • Literally: Eggs don’t teach a hen.
    • Meaning: Do not give advice to somebody more experienced than you.
    • English equivalent: Don’t teach your grandmother to suck eggs.
    • Modern mockery: Не учи папу трахаться. (Don’t teach your own Dad how to make sex.)
  • Я не я, и ло́шадь не моя́ (, и я не изво́зчик).
    • Transliteration: Ya ne ya, i loshad’ ne moya (, i ya ne izvozchik) .
    • Translation: I’m not me, and [this] horse isn’t mine (, and I’m not a cabman)
    • Meaning: I’m denying your accusations. — Also (used in “O RLY” fashion): What you’re telling me, contradicts obvious facts; You must be lying.
    • Compare: Мели́, Еме́ля — твоя́ неде́ля.
    • Modern mockery: Я — не я, и жопа не моя (‘Ya ne ya, i jhopa ne moya. I’m not me, and [this] arse isn’t mine). Мопед не мой (The moped isn’t mine).

Cold War

  • Доверя́й, но проверя́й.
    • Transliteration: Doveryay, no proveryay.
    • Translation: ‘Trust, but verify.’
    • See also: Обже́гшись на молоке́, ду́ют на́ воду.

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