Religions

Religion is a set of common beliefs and practices pertaining to the supernatural (and its relationship to humanity and the cosmos), which are often codified into prayer, ritual, scriptures, and religious law. These beliefs and practices are typically defined in light of a shared canonical vocabulary of venerable traditions, writings, history, and mythology.

Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a meaning to life. Religions may contain symbolic stories, which are sometimes said by followers to be true, that have the side purpose of explaining the origin of life, the universe, and other things.

The world’s principal religions and spiritual traditions may be classified into a small number of major groups, although this is by no means a uniform practice. This theory began in the 18th century with the goal of recognizing the relative levels of civility in societies.

Religions love unity peace, and strength

Religions love unity peace, and strength

There are different ways of categorization of world religions.

 Relatively crude geographical schemes that distinguish Western Religions from Eastern Religions are quite common.

 Religions can be categorized by how many deities they worship. Monotheistic religions accept only one deity (predominantly referred to as God), polytheistic religions accept multiple deities. Henotheistic religions accept one supreme deity without denying other deities, considering them as aspects of the same divine principle; and nontheistic religions deny any supreme eternal creator deity but accept a pantheon of deities which live, die and may be reborn like any other being.

 Some academics studying the subject have divided religions into three broad categories: world religions, a term which refers to transcultural, international faiths; indigenous religions, which refers to smaller, culture-specific or nation-specific religious groups; and new religious movements, which refers to recently developed faiths.

 Religious traditions fall into super-groups in comparative religion, arranged by historical origin and mutual influence.

East Asian Religions

The East Asian religions or Taoic religions form a subset of the Eastern religions. This group includes Chinese religion overall, which further includes ancestral worship, Chinese folk religion, Confucianism, Taoism and so-called popular salvationist organisations, as well as elements drawn from Mahayana Buddhism that form the core of Chinese Buddhism and East Asian Buddhism at large. The group also includes Japanese Shintoism and Korean Sindoism, which have received influences from Chinese religions throughout the centuries.

Main articles:

Confucianism

Shintoism

Taoism

Other

Paganism

Chinese

Japanese

Korean

Vietnamese

State religion

Hand Candle Diwali Festival Of Lights Hinduism

Diwali Festival Of Lights Hinduism

Indian religions

Indian religions, sometimes also termed as Dharmic faiths or Dharmic religions (Dharma), are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism (2 schools Vedanta and Yoga, and 7 denominations Ayyavazhi, Vaishnavism, Shaivism, Shaktism, Smartism, and Śrauta), Jainism (Digambara, Śvētāmbara), Buddhism (Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana) and Sikhism. These religions are also all classified as Eastern religions.

Main articles:

Buddhism

Buddhism
Buddhist Philosophy
Schools of Buddhism

New Buddhist movements

Global variants of Buddhism

Sikhism

Sikhs and Sikhism
Sects of Sikhism

Hinduism

Hinduism
Hindu Philosophy
Hindu denominations

Bhakti movement

Neo-Hinduism

Hindu reform movements
Neo-Vedanta

Major schools and movements

Nāstik (Heterodox Indian)

Jainism

Jainism
Jain Philosophy
Jain schools and branches

Abrahamic religions

Abrahamic religions
A mosque, a church and a synagogue together in Istanbul.

Middle Eastern Religions

Middle Eastern religions originated in the Middle East; namely Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and Iranian religions (Zoroastrianism, Yazdanism and historical traditions of Gnosticism, Mandaeism, Manichaeism). See also: Western Religions

 

Christianity

Eastern Christianity

Protestantism

Catholicism

Nontrinitarian denominational families

Traditional Christian groups
Modern Christian groups

Islam

Shia Islam

Sufism

Sunni Islam

Other

The Star of David (or Magen David), is a generally recognized symbol of modern Jewish identity and Judaism.

The Star of David (or Magen David), is a generally recognized symbol of modern Jewish identity and Judaism.

Judaism

Haymanot

Karaite Judaism

Kabbalah

Noahidism

Rabbinic Judaism

Samaritans

Historical Judaism

Mandaeism

Manichaeism

Rastafari

Black Hebrew Israelites

Shabakism

Yazdânism

Zoroastrianism

Bábism

Druze

Indigenous (ethnic, folk) religions

Indigenous Religions or Nature Religion that consist of the traditional customs and beliefs (Paganism, Animism, Totemism, Shamanism) of particular ethnic groups, refined and expanded upon for thousands of years, often lacking formal doctrine.

Main articles: Aztec philosophy, and Indigenous American Philosophy

African

Religion in Africa

Traditional African religions

Afro-American religions

Afro-American religion

European

American

Inuit religion
Native American religion

Altaic

Austroasiatic

Austronesian

Australian Aboriginal traditions

Chinese

Japanese

Religion in Japan

Korean

Religion in Korea

New religious movements

New religious movements, a heterogeneous group of religious faiths emerging since the nineteenth century, often syncretizing, re-interpreting or reviving aspects of older traditions such as Western esotericism, Modern Paganism, Hindu derived religions, New ethnic religions, Entheogenic religions, New Thought, some inspired by science-fiction (UFO religions, Scientology), Political Religions, and Parody religions.

Irreligion

New Thought

History of New Thought

Modern Paganism

Ethnic neopaganism

Polytheistic reconstructionism

Syncretic neopaganism

Entheogenic religions

Entheogen

Other new

Western esotericism

New ethnic religions

Ethnic religion

Black

White

Native American

Chicano/Mexican-American

Cargo cults

New Age

Cult

Post-theistic and naturalistic religions

Post-theism
Religious naturalism

UFO religions

New Hindu derived religions

Parody religions

Parody religion

Political Religions

Secularism 
Secular Religion

Mountain of Gods, Nemrut- turkey

Mountain of Gods, Nemrut- turkey

Historical religions

Historical religions of the ancient world shared many of the same patterns with each other even though the cultures may never have had any contact with each other. Such as Prehistoric religion, Ancient Egyptian ReligionAncient Mesopotamian ReligionBrahmanismReligion in pre-Islamic ArabiaInca mythology, ancient Greece and Rome and their Hellenistic descendants.

Main article: Religions of The Ancient Near East

Atheism

Atheism

Atheism

Atheism refers in its broadest sense to a denial of theism (the belief in the existence of a single deity or deities). Atheism has many shades and types. Some atheists strongly deny the existence of God (or any form of deity) and attack theistic claims.

General atheism concepts

Related positions

What type of thing is atheism?

Types of atheism

Atheistic arguments

History of atheism

Persons influential in atheism

FAQ on Atheism

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