In Buddhism,” wisdom” is realizing or perceiving the true nature of reality; seeing things as they are, not as they appear. This wisdom is not bound by conceptual knowledge. It must be intimately experienced to be understood.

Buddhist Folktales and Parables

Buddhist Folktales and Parables The Father A young single father had a son that he loved more than anything in the world. One day while the father was away, some plunderers burned down most of his village and kidnapped the little boy. When the father came back, he mistook one...

Prajna or Panna in Buddhism

Prajna or Panna in Buddhism In Sanskrit and Pali, This Is the Word for Wisdom Prajna is Sanskrit for “wisdom.” Panna is the Pali equivalent, more often used in Theravada Buddhism. But what is “wisdom” in Buddhism? The English word wisdom is linked to knowledge. If you look the word up in dictionaries, you find definitions such...

The Wisdom of The Other Bank

The Wisdom of The Other Bank Fine mysticism of Buddhism—The man who was born blind—The Tevigga Sutta—The Sinner—The Penitent Thief—”God revealed in the form of mercy—Death of Buddha. If the Roman Catholics were told that St. Francois de Salis, or St. Jerome, “altogether ignored in nature any spiritual aspirations,” * they would feel a...

Buddhism dham jak

Fundamentals of Buddhism: Wisdom

Fundamentals of Buddhism: Wisdom Today we are going to complete our survey of the Noble Eightfold Path. In the last two weeks, we have looked at good conduct and mental development. Today, we have the third group to look at, and that is the wisdom group. Here we have an...

Noble Eightfold Path

Noble Eightfold Path The Noble Eightfold Path (ariyo aṭṭhaṅgiko maggo; āryāṣṭāṅgamārga)[1] is an early summary of the path of Buddhist practices leading to liberation from samsara, the painful cycle of rebirth.[2][3] The Eightfold Path consists of eight practices: right view, right resolve, right speech, right conduct, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right samadhi (‘meditative absorption or union’).[4] In...

Four Noble Truths

Four Noble Truths In Buddhism, the Four Noble Truths (catvāri āryasatyāni; cattāri ariyasaccāni) are “the truths of the Noble Ones,”[1] the truths or realities which are understood by the “worthy ones” who have attained nirvana.[2] The truths are: dukkha, “incapable of satisfying,” painful;[3][4][5][6] samudaya, the “arising” of dukkha together with tanha (“thirst,” desire, craving); nirodha, “cessation” of dukkha by “confinement” of tanha; and marga, the path leading to...

The Basics of Buddhist Wisdom

The Basics of Buddhist Wisdom The Four Noble Truths Life is suffering; Suffering is due to attachment; Attachment can be overcome; There is a path for accomplishing this. Suffering is perhaps the most common translation for the Sanskrit word duhkha, which can also be translated as imperfect, stressful, or filled...

Tirukkural: The Book of Wisdom

Tirukkural: The Book of Wisdom Ancient Text on Virtue, Wealth & Love The Tirukkural (திருக்குறள், literally Sacred Verses), or shortly the Kural, is a classic Tamil language text consisting of 1,330 couplets or Kurals.[3] The text is divided into three books, each with aphoristic teachings on virtue (aram, dharma), wealth (porul, artha) and love (inbam, kama).[1][4][5] Considered one of the greatest...

Prajñā in Buddhism

Prajñā in Buddhism Prajñā (Sanskrit) or paññā (Pāli), often translated as “wisdom”, is the state of understanding. It is described in Buddhist commentaries as the understanding of the true nature of phenomena. In the context of Buddhist meditation, it is the ability to understand the three characteristics of all things: anicca (impermanence), dukkha (dissatisfaction or suffering), and anattā (non-self). Mahāyāna texts describe...

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