The concept of God, as described by theologians, commonly includes the attributes of omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (all-powerful), omnipresence (all-present), and as having an eternal and necessary existence. 

In monotheistic thought, God is conceived of as the supreme beingcreator deity, and principal object of faith.

Gratitude to God in The Old Testament

Gratitude to God in The Old Testament Moreover, when God gives any man wealth and possessions, and enables him to enjoy them, to accept his lot and be happy in his work—this is a gift of God. (Ecclesiastes, 5:19) Sing to the Lord, you saints of His; praise His holy...

kneeling praying

Submission to God in The Old Testament

Submission to God in The Old Testament The Lord is my strength and my shield; my heart trusts in Him, and I am helped. (Psalms, 28:7) Those who trust in the Lord… which can not be shaken but endures forever. (Psalms, 125:1) He said: “The Lord is my strength, my...

Obedience to God’s Commandments

Obedience to God’s Commandments in The Old Testament So be careful to do what the Lord your God has commanded you; do not turn aside to the right or to the left. Walk in all the way that the Lord your God has commanded you, so that you may live...

Fear of God

Fear of God The Fear of God refers to fear or a specific sense of respect, awe, and submission to a deity. People subscribing to popular monotheistic religions might fear divine judgment, hell or God’s omnipotence. Bahá’í In the Bahá’í Faith, “The heart must be sanctified from every form of...

Avatar

What Is Avatar? An avatar (अवतार, avatāra), a concept in Hinduism that means “descent”, refers to the material appearance or incarnation of a deity on earth.[1][2] The relative verb to “alight, to make one’s appearance” is sometimes used to refer to any guru or revered human being.[3][4] The word avatar does not appear in the Vedic literature,[5] but appears in verb forms...

Respect for God in the Old Testament

Respect for God in the Old Testament Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Revere God and keep His commandments, for this is the whole duty of man. (Ecclesiastes, 12:13)   Let all the earth fear the Lord; let all the people of the world...

Theology

What Is Theology? Theology is the critical study of the nature of the divine. It is taught as an academic discipline, typically in universities and seminaries.[1] Theology is basically the study of deities or their scriptures[2] in order to discover what they have revealed about themselves. While theology has turned into a secular field, religious adherents still consider theology...

Divine Grace

Divine Grace Divine grace is a theological term present in many religions. It has been defined as the divine influence which operates in humans to regenerate and sanctify, to inspire virtuous impulses, and to impart strength to endure trial and resist temptation;[1] and as an individual virtue or excellence of divine origin.[2] Christianity Grace in Christianity is...

Brahman

Brahman In Hindu philosophy, Brahman (ब्रह्म) is the material, efficient, formal and final cause of all that exists and the highest Universal Principle, the Ultimate Reality in the universe.[1][2][3][4][1][5] These schools of thought also consider Brahman to be the pervasive, genderless, infinite, eternal truth and bliss which does not change, yet is the cause of all changes.[4][6][7] Brahman as a metaphysical concept...

Ishvara

What Is Ishvara? Ishvara (ईश्वर) is a concept in Hinduism, with a wide range of meanings that depend on the era and the school of Hinduism.[1][2] In ancient texts of Indian philosophy, depending on the context, Ishvara can mean supreme soul, ruler, lord, king, queen or husband.[1] In medieval era Hindu texts, depending on the...

Creator in Buddhism

Creator in Buddhism Buddhist thought consistently rejects the notion of a creator deity.[1][2] It teaches the concept of gods, heavens and rebirths in its Saṃsāra doctrine, but it considers none of these gods as a creator. Buddhism posits that mundane deities such as Mahabrahma are misconstrued to be a creator.[3] Buddhist ontology follows...

Binitarianism

What Is Binitarianism? Binitarianism is a Christian theology of two persons, personas, or aspects in one substance/Divinity (or God). Classically, binitarianism is understood as a form of monotheism—that is, that God is absolutely one being—and yet with binitarianism there is a “twoness” in God, which means one God family. The other common forms of monotheism...

Aristotelian Theology

Aristotelian Theology Aristotelian theology and the scholastic view of God have been influential in Western intellectual history. Metaphysics In his first philosophy, later called the Metaphysics, (or “after the Physics”), Aristotle discusses the meaning of being as being. He refers to the unmoved movers (hyperagents), and assigns one to each movement in the heavens and tasks future astronomers with correlating the estimated 47 to...

Set (Deity)

Set (Deity) Set or Seth (Setesh, Sutekh,[1] Setekh, or Suty) is a god of chaos, the desert, storms, disorder, violence, and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion.[2] In Ancient Greek, the god’s name is given as Sēth (Σήθ). Set had a positive role where he accompanies Ra on his solar boat to repel Apep, the serpent of Chaos.[2] Set had a vital role as...

Is Jesus God?

Is Jesus God? (Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Perspective) MANY people view the Trinity as “the central doctrine of the Christian religion.” According to this teaching, the Father, Son, and holy spirit are three persons in one God. Cardinal John O’Connor stated about the Trinity: “We know that it is a very profound...

Devi

Devi Devī (देवी) is the Sanskrit word for “goddess“; the masculine form is Deva. Devi – the feminine form, and Deva – the masculine form, mean “heavenly, divine, anything of excellence”, and are also gender specific terms for a deity in Hinduism. The concept and reverence for goddesses appears in the Vedas, which were...

I Am that I Am

I Am that I Am I am that I am is a common English translation of the Hebrew phrase אֶהְיֶה אֲשֶׁר אֶהְיֶה, ’ehyeh ’ăšer ’ehyeh – also “I am who I am”, “I am what I am” or “I will be what I will be” or even “I create what (ever) I create“. The traditional...

Tetragrammaton

Tetragrammaton The tetragrammaton (meaning “[consisting of] four letters”), יהוה in Hebrew and YHWH in Latin script, is the four-letter biblical name of the God of Israel.[1][2] The books of the Torah and the rest of the Hebrew Bible (with the exception of Esther and Song of Songs) contain this Hebrew name. Religiously observant Jews and those who follow Talmudic Jewish traditions do not pronounce יהוה, nor do they read...

Ilah

What is Ilah? Ilāh (إله‎; plural: آلهة ʾālihah) is an Arabic term meaning “deity” or “god“. The feminine is ʾilāhah (إلاهة, meaning “goddess“); with the article, it appears as al-ʾilāhah – الإلاهة. The Arabic word for God (al-Lāh) is thought to be derived from it.1]2] ʾIlāh is cognate to Northwest Semitic ʾēl and Akkadian ilum. The...

Elohim

Elohim Elohim (אֱלֹהִים) in the Hebrew Bible refers to deities, and is one of the many names or titles for God in the Hebrew Bible.   The word is identical to the usual plural of el, meaning gods or magistrates, and is cognate to the ‘l-h-m found in Ugaritic, where it is used for the pantheon of Canaanite gods, the children of El,...

Scroll Up